Search results for 'Murray Sheard' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Murray Sheard (2007). Sustainability and Property Rights in Environmental Resources. Environmental Ethics 29 (4):389-401.score: 240.0
    How do we weigh the claims of current and future people when current exercise of rights to property conflict with sustainability? Are property rights over theseresources more limited due to the claims of posterity? Lockean property rights allow no right to degrade resources when doing so threatens the basic needs offuture generations. A stewardship conception of property rights can be developed, providing a justification for sustainable management legislation even whensuch law conflicts with the rights an owner would have, were the (...)
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  2. Murray Sheard (2008). Corporate Responsibilities and Property Rights in the Management of Natural Resources. Philosophy of Management 6 (2):99-106.score: 240.0
    Businesses interface with the natural world through rights to property. The shape of these rights and the responsibilities we assign to managers are important determinants of both patterns of resource use and pollutant levels. Consequently, conflicts have arisen between regulating bodies, indigenous groups, andcorporations over the entitlements of businesses in the use of their property when that property is ecologically sensitive or significant.In this paper I develop an account of the ethical responsibilities of managers regarding their treatment of the environment (...)
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  3. Mary Ann Baily & Thomas H. Murray (2009). Mary Ann Baily and Thomas H. Murray Reply. Hastings Center Report 39 (1):7-7.score: 180.0
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  4. Lindley Murray (1996). Lindley Murray: The Educational Works. Routledge.score: 180.0
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  5. P. D. Murray (ed.) (2004). Reason, Truth, and Theology in Pragmatist Perspective. Peeters.score: 60.0
    In this work Paul Murray explores which style of rationality is most appropriate to Christian theology in the contemporary pluralist, postfoundationalist, ...
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  6. Gilbert Murray (2014). Humanist Essays (Routledge Revivals). Routledge.score: 60.0
    First published in 1964, this is a short collection of both literary and philosophical essays. Whilst two essays consider Greek literature written at the point at which the Athenian empire was breaking apart, another group explore the background from which Christianity arose, considering Paganism and the religious philosophy at the time of Christ. These, in particular, display Gilbert Murray’s ‘profound belief in ethics and disbelief in all revelational religions’ as well as his conviction that the roots of our society (...)
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  7. Gilbert Murray (2013). Liberality and Civilization (Routledge Revivals). Routledge.score: 60.0
    First published in 1938, these lectures argue that liberality is the foundation of civilization. According to Gilbert Murray, civilization provides the surplus of security, leisure and wealth that makes liberality possible; a failure of liberality is the surest test of the failure of a civilization. This is a fascinating reissue that will be of great value to students with an interest in political philosophy and the foundations of liberal society.
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  8. Gilbert Murray (2013). Stoic, Christian and Humanist. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This book collects together four essays by the very well-known academic Gilbert Murray that were first presented between 1914 and 1939. The author seeks to present a statement of his profound belief in ethics and disbelief in revelational religions. The philosophy of this great thinker is accessibly written while it addresses deep questions of the nature of morality and the basis of religions. This collection was first published in 1940.
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  9. Adam Murray & Jessica M. Wilson (2012). Relativized Metaphysical Modality. In Karen Bennett & Dean Zimmerman (eds.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 189.score: 30.0
    It is commonly supposed that metaphysical modal claims are to be evaluated with respect to a single domain of possible worlds: a claim is metaphysically necessary just in case it is true in every possible world, and metaphysically possible just in case it is true in some possible world. We argue that the standard understanding is incorrect; rather, whether a given claim is metaphysically necessary or possible is relative to which world is indicatively actual. We motivate our view by attention (...)
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  10. Craig D. Murray & Michael S. Gordon (2001). Changes in Bodily Awareness Induced by Immersive Virtual Reality. CyberPsychology and Behavior 4 (3):365-371.score: 30.0
  11. Michael J. Murray (1995). Leibniz on Divine Foreknowledge of Future Contingents and Human Freedom. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):75-108.score: 30.0
  12. Bradley Murray (2007). Kant on Genius and Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):199-214.score: 30.0
    The paper distinguishes between two different senses of ‘genius’ found in Kant's Critique of Judgement, and criticizes an argument commonly attributed to Kant. The argument is in support of the conclusion that an agent must possess and employ genius in the ‘productive faculty’ sense in order to produce an artwork. It is shown that Kant did not in fact make this argument. He defended a different claim concerning the need to employ the concept of a productive faculty of genius in (...)
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  13. Dylan Murray & Eddy Nahmias (2014). Explaining Away Incompatibilist Intuitions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (2):434-467.score: 30.0
    The debate between compatibilists and incompatibilists depends in large part on what ordinary people mean by ‘free will’, a matter on which previous experimental philosophy studies have yielded conflicting results. In Nahmias, Morris, Nadelhoffer, and Turner (2005, 2006), most participants judged that agents in deterministic scenarios could have free will and be morally responsible. Nichols and Knobe (2007), though, suggest that these apparent compatibilist responses are performance errors produced by using concrete scenarios, and that their abstract scenarios reveal the folk (...)
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  14. William E. Smythe & Maureen J. Murray (2000). Owning the Story: Ethical Considerations in Narrative Research. Ethics and Behavior 10 (4):311 – 336.score: 30.0
    This article argues that traditional, regulative principles of research ethics offer insufficient guidance for research in the narrative study of lives. These principles presuppose an implicit epistemology that conceives of research participants as data sources, a conception that is argued not tenable for narrative research. The case is made by drawing on recent discussions of research ethics in the qualitative and narrative research literature. This article shows that narrative ethics is inextricably entwined with epistemological issues--namely, issues of narrative ownership and (...)
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  15. Michael Murray (2006). Neo-Cartesianism and the Problem of Animal Suffering. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):169-190.score: 30.0
    The existence and extent of animal suffering provides grounds for a serious evidential challenge to theism. In the wake of the Darwinian revolution, this strain of natural atheology has taken on substantially greater significance. In this essay we argue that there are at least four neo-Cartesian views on the nature of animal minds which would serve to deflect this evidential challenge.
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  16. Michael Murray, Who's Afraid of Religion?score: 30.0
    And in Jesus Christ his only Son our Lord; who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead, and buried; he descended into hell; the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty; from thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.
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  17. Eddy Nahmias & Dylan Murray (2010). Experimental Philosophy on Free Will: An Error Theory for Incompatibilist Intuitions. In Jesus Aguilar, Andrei Buckareff & Keith Frankish (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Action. Palgrave-Macmillan. 189--215.score: 30.0
    We discuss recent work in experimental philosophy on free will and moral responsibility and then present a new study. Our results suggest an error theory for incompatibilist intuitions. Most laypersons who take determinism to preclude free will and moral responsibility apparently do so because they mistakenly interpret determinism to involve fatalism or “bypassing” of agents’ relevant mental states. People who do not misunderstand determinism in this way tend to see it as compatible with free will and responsibility. We discuss why (...)
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  18. Michael Murray, Four Arguments That the Cognitive Psychology of Religion Undermines the Justification of Religious Belief.score: 30.0
    Over the last decade a handful of cognitive models of religious belief have begun to coalesce in the literature. Attempts to offer “scientific explanations of religious belief ” are nothing new, stretching back at least as far as David Hume, and perhaps as far back as Cicero. What is also not new is a belief that scientific explanations of religious belief serve in some way to undermine the justification for those beliefs.
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  19. Michael J. Murray (2008). Nature Red in Tooth and Claw: Theism and the Problem of Animal Suffering. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Problems of and explanations for evil -- Neo-cartesianism -- Animal suffering and the fall -- Nobility, flourishing, and immortality : animal pain and animal well-being -- Natural evil, nomic regularity, and animal suffering -- Chaos, order, and evolution -- Combining CDs.
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  20. Barry Smith & David Murray (1981). Logic, Form and Matter. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 55:47 - 74.score: 30.0
    It is argued, on the basis of ideas derived from Wittgenstein's Tractatus and Husserl's Logical Investigations, that the formal comprehends more than the logical. More specifically: that there exist certain formal-ontological constants (part, whole, overlapping, etc.) which do not fall within the province of logic. A two-dimensional directly depicting language is developed for the representation of the constants of formal ontology, and means are provided for the extension of this language to enable the representation of certain materially necessary relations. The (...)
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  21. William Harper, Sheldon J. Chow & Gemma Murray (2012). Bayesian Chance. Synthese 186 (2):447-474.score: 30.0
    This paper explores how the Bayesian program benefits from allowing for objective chance as well as subjective degree of belief. It applies David Lewis’s Principal Principle and David Christensen’s principle of informed preference to defend Howard Raiffa’s appeal to preferences between reference lotteries and scaling lotteries to represent degrees of belief. It goes on to outline the role of objective lotteries in an application of rationality axioms equivalent to the existence of a utility assignment to represent preferences in Savage’s famous (...)
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  22. Dylan Murray, Justin Sytsma & Jonathan Livengood (2013). God Knows (but Does God Believe?). Philosophical Studies 166 (1):83-107.score: 30.0
    The standard view in epistemology is that propositional knowledge entails belief. Positive arguments are seldom given for this entailment thesis, however; instead, its truth is typically assumed. Against the entailment thesis, Myers-Schulz and Schwitzgebel (Noûs, forthcoming) report that a non-trivial percentage of people think that there can be propositional knowledge without belief. In this paper, we add further fuel to the fire, presenting the results of four new studies. Based on our results, we argue that the entailment thesis does not (...)
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  23. Michael Murray, Do Objective Ethical Norms Need Theistic Grounding?score: 30.0
    Recent Christian reflection on the relation of religion and ethics has focused a great deal on establishing a conception of ethics in which God plays a central role. The numerous attempts to respond to Plato's "Euthyphro Dilemma" and the various defenses of the divine command theory provide two examples of this phenomenon. But much of this ethical reflection has gone on in a way that is largely “defensive.” That is, those engaged in such discussions typically describe an ethical theory which (...)
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  24. Robert D. Murray (1995). Is Davidson's Theory of Action Consistent? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):317 - 334.score: 30.0
    According to a familiar objection to Davidson's causal theory of action, reasons are not causes qua reasons unless explanations of actions fit reason and action into a nomic nexus. The focus of this criticism should really be redirected to the issue of whether or not Davidson's theory provides an account of the explanatory force of explanations of actions.
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  25. Dale Murray (2010). Free Riding. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (3):417-419.score: 30.0
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  26. Michael Murray, Does Prayer Change Things?score: 30.0
    The belief that God responds to prayer is widespread. According to a recent Newsweek survey 87% of Americans said that they believe that God answers prayers. In fact, they believe so heartily in the efficacy of prayer that nearly one third of those polled said that they prayed to God more than once a day. What is even more interesting about this belief among ordinary Americans is that it has been denied by so many theologians. One might think such denials (...)
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  27. Michael Sheard (2001). Weak and Strong Theories of Truth. Studia Logica 68 (1):89-101.score: 30.0
    A subtheory of the theory of self-referential truth known as FS is shown to be weak as a theory of truth but equivalent to full FS in its proof-theoretic strength.
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  28. Michael J. Murray (2008). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Attributes of God : independence, goodness, and power -- Attributes of God : eternity, knowledge, and providence -- God triune and incarnate -- Faith and rationality -- Theistic arguments -- Anti-theistic arguments -- Religion and science -- Religion, morality, and politics -- Mind, body, and immortality.
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  29. Michael Murray, Leibniz on the Problem of Evil. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  30. K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.) (2002). Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies. Blackwell Publishers.score: 30.0
    This volume illustrates the central importance of diversity of human values throughout healthcare.
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  31. Michael Murray (1974). A Note on Wittgenstein and Heidegger. Philosophical Review 83 (4):501-503.score: 30.0
  32. Michael J. Murray (2005). Spontaneity and Freedom in Leibniz. In Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. 194--216.score: 30.0
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  33. Michael Sheard (1994). A Guide to Truth Predicates in the Modern Era. Journal of Symbolic Logic 59 (3):1032-1054.score: 30.0
  34. Patrick Murray (2000). Marx's “Truly Social” Labour Theory of Value: Part I, Abstract Labour in Marxian Value Theory. Historical Materialism 6 (1):27-66.score: 30.0
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  35. B. A., C. W. Valentine, G. Galloway, G. G., J. Solomon, R. R. Marett, John Edgar, B. Bosanquet, F. Peters, D. L. Murray, T. E., J. Field, J. Waterlow, A. E. Taylor & A. W. Benn (1911). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 20 (1):426-444.score: 30.0
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  36. Michael J. Murray & Jeffrey Schloss (eds.) (2009/2010). The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological reflections (...)
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  37. Patrick Murray (2000). Marx's 'Truly Social' Labour Theory of Value: Part II, How Is Labour That Is Under the Sway of Capital Actually Abstract? Historical Materialism 7 (1):99-136.score: 30.0
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  38. Thomas Faunce, Katherine Murray, Hitoshi Nasu & Diana Bowman (2008). Sunscreen Safety: The Precautionary Principle, the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration and Nanoparticles in Sunscreens. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 2 (3):231-240.score: 30.0
    The ‘Precautionary Principle’ provides a somewhat ill-defined guide, often of uncertain normative status, for those exercising administrative decision-making power in circumstances where that may create potential risks to human health or the environment. This paper seeks to explore to what extent the precautionary principle should have been and was in fact utilised by the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in its decision to approve the marketing of sunscreens containing titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) in nanoparticulate form. In particular, (...)
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  39. Patrick Murray & Jeanne Schuler (2005). Karl Marx and the Critique of Bourgeois Philosophy. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79 (2):229-246.score: 30.0
    Marx launched a revolution in social thought that has been largely ignored. We locate this revolution in the context of two major reassessments of modern philosophy, Heidegger’s Being and Time and Donald Davidson’s new anti-subjectivism. We argue that the philosophical significance of Marx’s critique of the capitalist mode of production—his critique of the bourgeois horizon—has been overlooked. The paper exposes the bourgeois mindset that runs through political economy, “traditional” Marxism, and much of modern and postmodern philosophy. Bourgeois thinking is marked (...)
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  40. Patrick Murray (2006). In Defence of the 'Third Thing Argument': A Reply to James Furner's 'Marx's Critique of Samuel Bailey'. Historical Materialism 14 (2):149-168.score: 30.0
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  41. Thomas H. Murray & Josephine Johnston (eds.) (2010). Trust and Integrity in Biomedical Research: The Case of Financial Conflicts of Interest. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 30.0
    This volume assesses the ethical, quantitative, and qualitative questions posed by the current financing of biomedical research.
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  42. Michael Murray, The God's I Point of View.score: 30.0
    Recent non-representationalists and metaphysical anti-realists (such as Goodman, Putnam, Rorty, etc.) have argued that the “Enlightenment notion” of a “God’s eye” point of view of the world is unsustainable. Deployment of conceptual schemes and/or intersubjective assent both constitute the world and fix the truth value of our statements about it. Many theists, on the contrary, hold an equally extreme realist position according to which God has a view of the world as it is “in itself" which provides (...)
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  43. Richard Lachapelle, Deborah Murray & Sandy Neim (2003). Aesthetic Understanding as Informed Experience: The Role of Knowledge in Our Art Viewing Experiences. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (3):78-98.score: 30.0
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  44. Michael J. Murray & David F. Dudrick (1995). Are Coerced Acts Free? American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (2):109 - 123.score: 30.0
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  45. Dale Francis Murray (2004). Liberalism, Art, and Funding. Journal of Aesthetic Education 38 (3):116-122.score: 30.0
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  46. Kevin Murray (1985). Life as Fiction. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 15 (2):173–187.score: 30.0
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  47. Oswyn Murray (1972). Meyer Reinhold: History of Purple as a Status Symbol in Antiquity. (Collection Latomus, 116.) Pp. 75. Brussels: Latomus, 1970. Paper, 120 B.Fr. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (02):293-.score: 30.0
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  48. Thomas H. Murray (2010). Making Sense of Fairness in Sports. Hastings Center Report 40 (2):13-15.score: 30.0
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  49. Michael Murray, Philosophy and Christian Theology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  50. Michael J. Murray (2002). Review of Peter Geach, Truth and Hope: The Furst Franz Josef Und Furstin Gina Lectures Delivered at the International Academy of Philosophy, 1998. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (2).score: 30.0
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