Search results for 'Music' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
See also:
Bibliography: Music in Arts and Humanities
Bibliography: Philosophy of Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Definition of Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Ontology of Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Musical Experience in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Varieties of Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Philosophy of Music, Misc in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Musical Ontology, Misc in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Musical Performance in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Musical Works in Aesthetics
...
Other categories were found but are not shown. Use more specific keywords to find others, or browse the categories.
  1. Pop Music (2004). Music Critics and Aestheticians Are, on the Surface, Advocates and Guardians of Good Music. But What Exactly is “Good”. In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge 62.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Rock Critics Need Bad Music (2004). “I Like Bad Music.” That's My Usual Response to People Who Ask Me About My Musi. In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  18
    Andreas Dorschel (2011). Music and Pain. In Jane Fulcher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the New Cultural History of Music. Oxford University Press 68-79.
    Ancient mythology related music to pain in a twofold way. Pain is the punishment inflicted for producing inferior music: the fate of Marsyas; music is sublimation of pain: the achievement of Orpheus and of Philomela. Both aspects have played defining roles in Western musical culture. Pain’s natural expression is the scream. To be present in music at all, pain needs to be transformed. So even where music expresses pain, at the same time it appeases that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  51
    Kendall Walton (2011/2015). Thoughtwriting—in Poetry and Music. In Kendall L. Walton (ed.), In Other Shoes: Music, Metaphor, Empathy, Existence. Oxford University Press 54-74.
    Poetry is a literary art, and is often examined alongside the novel, stories, and theater. But poetry, much of it, has more in common with music, in important respects, than with other forms of literature. The emphasis on sound and rhythm in both poetry and music is obvious, but I will explore a very different similarity between them. All or almost all works of literary fiction have narrators—so it is said anyway—characters who, in the world of the fiction, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Robin James (2011). Feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'. In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Patrik N. Juslin & Daniel Västfjäll (2008). Emotional Responses to Music: The Need to Consider Underlying Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):559-575.
    Research indicates that people value music primarily because of the emotions it evokes. Yet, the notion of musical emotions remains controversial, and researchers have so far been unable to offer a satisfactory account of such emotions. We argue that the study of musical emotions has suffered from a neglect of underlying mechanisms. Specifically, researchers have studied musical emotions without regard to how they were evoked, or have assumed that the emotions must be based on the mechanism for emotion induction, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  7. Andrew Geeves, Doris J. F. McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2013). To Think or Not To Think: The Apparent Paradox of Expert Skill in Music Performance. Educational Philosophy and Theory (6):1-18.
    Expert skill in music performance involves an apparent paradox. On stage, expert musicians are required accurately to retrieve information that has been encoded over hours of practice. Yet they must also remain open to the demands of the ever-changing situational contingencies with which they are faced during performance. To further explore this apparent paradox and the way in which it is negotiated by expert musicians, this article profiles theories presented by Roger Chaffin, Hubert Dreyfus and Tony and Helga Noice. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8.  14
    Wesley D. Cray (2016). Unperformable Works and the Ontology of Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (1):67-81.
    Some artworks—works of music, theatre, dance, and the like—are works for performance. Some works for performance are, I contend, unperformable. Some such works are unperformable by beings like us; others are unperformable given our laws of nature; still others are unperformable given considerations of basic logic. I offer examples of works for performance—focusing, in particular, on works of music—that would fit into each of these categories, and go on to defend the claim that such ‘works’ really are genuine (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  56
    John Powell, Time, Music, and Gardens. Proceedings: Time Theories and Music Conference.
    This conference paper contests the validity of some traditional concepts of gardens. It introduces the possibility of considering the passage of time in gardens as a musical, rhythmic phenomonen.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Joel Krueger (2011). Doing Things with Music. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  11. Roger Scruton (1999). The Aesthetics of Music. Oxford University Press.
    What is music, what is its value, and what does it mean? In this stimulating volume, Roger Scruton offers a comprehensive account of the nature and significance of music from the perspective of modern philosophy. The study begins with the metaphysics of sound. Scruton distinguishes sound from tone; analyzes rhythm, melody, and harmony; and explores the various dimensions of musical organization and musical meaning. Taking on various fashionable theories in the philosophy and theory of music, he presents (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  12.  68
    Jyh-Shen Chiou, Chien-yi Huang & Hsin-hui Lee (2005). The Antecedents of Music Piracy Attitudes and Intentions. Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):161 - 174.
    Piracy is the greatest threat facing the music industry worldwide today. This study developed and empirically tested a model examining the antecedents of consumer attitude and behavioral intention toward music piracy behavior. Two types of music piracy behavior, unauthorized duplication/download and pirated music product purchasing, were examined. Based on a field survey in Taiwan, the results showed that attributive satisfaction, perceived prosecution risk, magnitude of consequence, and social consensus are very important in influencing customers attitude and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  13. Tom Cochrane (2010). Using the Persona to Express Complex Emotions in Music. Music Analysis 29 (1-3):264-275.
  14. Robert F. Easley (2005). Ethical Issues in the Music Industry Response to Innovation and Piracy. Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):163 - 168.
    The current conflict between the recording industry and a portion of its customers who are involved in illicit copying of music files arose from innovations involving the compression and electronic distribution of files over the internet. This paper briefly describes some of the challenges faced by the recording industry, and examines some of the ethical issues that arise in various industry and consumer responses to the opportunities and threats presented by these innovations. The paper concludes by highlighting the risks (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  15. Jonathan A. Neufeld (2013). Billy Budd's Song: Authority and Music in the Public Sphere. Opera Quarterly 28 (3-4):172-191.
    While Billy Budd's beauty has often been connected to his innocence and his moral goodness, the significance of the musical character of his beauty—what I will argue is the site of a struggle for political expression—has not been remarked upon by commentators of Melville's novella. It has, however, been deeply explored by Britten's opera. Music has often been situated at, or just beyond, the limits of communication; it has served as a medium of the ineffable, of unsaid and unsayable (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Julian Dodd (2007). Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- The type/token theory introduced -- Motivating the type/token theory : repeatability -- Nominalist approaches to the ontology of music -- Musical anti-realism -- The type/token theory elaborated -- Types I : abstract, unstructured, unchanging -- Types introduced and nominalism repelled -- Types as abstracta -- Types as unstructured entities -- Types as fixed and unchanging -- Types II : platonism -- Introduction : eternal existence and timelessness -- Types and properties -- The eternal existence of properties reconsidered (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  17.  37
    Henkjan Honing & Annemie Ploeger (2012). Cognition and the Evolution of Music: Pitfalls and Prospects. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):513-524.
    What was the role of music in the evolutionary history of human beings? We address this question from the point of view that musicality can be defined as a cognitive trait. Although it has been argued that we will never know how cognitive traits evolved (Lewontin, 1998), we argue that we may know the evolution of music by investigating the fundamental cognitive mechanisms of musicality, for example, relative pitch, tonal encoding of pitch, and beat induction. In addition, we (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  18.  57
    Barbara Tillmann (2012). Music and Language Perception: Expectations, Structural Integration, and Cognitive Sequencing. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):568-584.
    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  19. Jerrold Levinson (2009). Philosophy and Music. Topoi 28 (2):119-123.
    This essay explores some aspects of the relation between philosophy and music. First, how music can inspire philosophy; second, how philosophy can inspire music. Mathematics as a middle term between music and philosophy, the idea of wholeness in a musical composition or a philosophical text, music as a mode of thought displaying traits such as logic, coherence, and sense—these are some ways in which music and philosophy may be seen to be connected. Also, composers (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  47
    Rong-An Shang, Yu-Chen Chen & Pin-Cheng Chen (2008). Ethical Decisions About Sharing Music Files in the P2p Environment. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):349 - 365.
    Digitized information and network have made an enormous impact on the music and movie industries. Internet piracy is popular and has greatly threatened the companies in these industries. This study tests Hunt-Vitell’s ethical decision model and attempts to understand why and how people share unauthorized music files with others in the peer-to-peer (P2P) network. The norm of anti-piracy, the ideology of free software, the norm of reciprocity, and the ideology of consumer rights are proposed as four deontological norms (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  21.  72
    Andrew Geeves, Doris Mcllwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2010). Expanding Expertise: Investigating a Musician’s Experience of Music Performance. ASCS09: Proceedings of the 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science:106-113.
    Seeking to expand on previous theories, this paper explores the AIR (Applying Intelligence to the Reflexes) approach to expert performance previously outlined by Geeves, Christensen, Sutton and McIlwain (2008). Data gathered from a semi-structured interview investigating the performance experience of Jeremy Kelshaw (JK), a professional musician, is explored. Although JK’s experience of music performance contains inherently uncertain elements, his phenomenological description of an ideal performance is tied to notions of vibe, connection and environment. The dynamic nature of music (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  85
    Leonard B. Meyer (1956). Emotion and Meaning in Music. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.
    Analyzes the meaning expressed in music, the social and psychological sources of meaning, and the methods of musical communication This is a book meant for ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   43 citations  
  23.  7
    Adrian Currie & Anton Killin (2016). Musical Pluralism and the Science of Music. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 6 (1):9-30.
    The scientific investigation of music requires contributions from a diverse array of disciplines. Given the diverse methodologies, interests and research targets of the disciplines involved, we argue that there is a plurality of legitimate research questions about music, necessitating a focus on integration. In light of this we recommend a pluralistic conception of music—that there is no unitary definition divorced from some discipline, research question or context. This has important implications for how the scientific study of (...) ought to proceed: we show that some definitions are complementary, that is, they reflect different research interests and ought to be retained and, where possible, integrated, while others are antagonistic, they represent real empirical disagreement about music’s nature and how to account for it. We illustrate this in discussion of two related issues: questions about the evolutionary function of music, and questions of the innateness of music. These debates have been, in light of pluralism, misconceived. We suggest that, in both cases, scientists ought to proceed by constructing integrated models which take into account the dynamic interaction between different aspects of music. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  62
    Shoshana Altschuller & Raquel Benbunan-Fich (2009). Is Music Downloading the New Prohibition? What Students Reveal Through an Ethical Dilemma. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (1):49-56.
    Although downloading music through unapproved channels is illegal, statistics indicate that it is widespread. The following study examines the attitudes and perceptions of college students that are potentially engaged in music downloading. The methodology includes a content analysis of the recommendations written to answer an ethical vignette. The vignette presented the case of a subject who faces the dilemma of whether or not to download music illegally. Analyses of the final reports indicate that there is a vast (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  25.  35
    Stephanie M. Stalinski & E. Glenn Schellenberg (2012). Music Cognition: A Developmental Perspective. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):485-497.
    Although music is universal, there is a great deal of cultural variability in music structures. Nevertheless, some aspects of music processing generalize across cultures, whereas others rely heavily on the listening environment. Here, we discuss the development of musical knowledge, focusing on four themes: (a) capabilities that are present early in development; (b) culture-general and culture-specific aspects of pitch and rhythm processing; (c) age-related changes in pitch perception; and (d) developmental changes in how listeners perceive emotion in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26. Peter Kivy (2002). Introduction to a Philosophy of Music. Clarendon Press.
    Philosophy of music has flourished in the last thirty years, with great advances made in the understanding of the nature of music and its aesthetics. Peter Kivy has been at the center of this flourishing, and now offers his personal introduction to philosophy of music, a clear and lively explanation of how he sees the most important and interesting philosophical issues relating to music. Anyone interested in music will find this a stimulating introduction to some (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  27. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Recognizing Emotion in Music (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Six).
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: How do we recognize distinct types of emotion in music?
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  3
    Giacomo Fronzi (2016). Listening to Music in the Digital Era. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (1):51-69.
    In this paper, I examine the relationship between new technologies and listening, starting from a distinction between two different levels. The first concerns the role new technologies play in the “mere” reproduction and diffusion of music materials that are not necessarily classifiable in the category of the so-called “technological music”; the second concerns the listening modes unavoidably involved in the reception of a music product, due to its very nature. To this end I shall focus my attention (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  8
    David E. Cooper (forthcoming). Music, Nature and Ineffability. Philosophia:1-10.
    In the final chapter of his Ineffability and Religious Experience, Guy Bennett-Hunter proposes that the ineffable may be ‘bodied forth’ through works of art and ritual, and hence engage with our lives. By way of supporting this proposal, this paper discusses some relationships between experiences of music and of natural environments. It is argued that several aspects of musical experience encourage a sense of convergence or intimacy between human practice and nature. Indeed, these aspects suggest a codependence between culture (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Andrew Kania, The Philosophy of Music. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is an overview of analytic philosophy of music. It is in five sections, as follows: 1. What Is Music? 2. Musical Ontology 3. Music and the Emotions 4. Understanding Music 5. Music and Value.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2009). “What Has Coltrane to Do With Mozart: The Dynamism and Built-in Flexibility of Music”. Expositions 3:57-71.
    Although contemporary Western culture and criticism has usually valued composition over improvisation and placed the authority of a musical work with the written text rather than the performer, this essay posits these divisions as too facile to articulate the complex dynamics of making music in any genre or form. Rather it insists that music should be understood as pieces that are created with specific intentions by composers but which possess possibilities of interpretation that can only be brought out (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  66
    Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  33.  10
    Edward H. Hagen & Gregory A. Bryant (2003). Music and Dance as a Coalition Signaling System. Human Nature 14 (1):21-51.
    Evidence suggests that humans might have neurological specializations for music processing, but a compelling adaptationist account of music and dance is lacking. The sexual selection hypothesis cannot easily account for the widespread performance of music and dance in groups (especially synchronized performances), and the social bonding hypothesis has severe theoretical difficulties. Humans are unique among the primates in their ability to form cooperative alliances between groups in the absence of consanguineal ties. We propose that this unique form (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  34. Panagiotis A. Kanellopoulos (2012). Envisioning Autonomy Through Improvising and Composing: Castoriadis Visiting Creative Music Education Practice. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (2):151-182.
    Do psychological perspectives constitute the only way through which the role of musical creativity in education can be addressed, researched and theorised? This essay attempts to offer an alternative view of musical creativity as a deeply social and political form of human praxis, by proposing a perspective rooted in the thought of the political philosopher and activist Cornelius Castoriadis (1922–1997). This is done in two steps. First, an attempt is made to place the pursuit of the concept of musical creativity (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  92
    Andrew Kania (2010). Silent Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):343-353.
    In this essay, I investigate musical silence. I first discuss how to integrate the concept of silence into a general theory or definition of music. I then consider the possibility of an entirely silent musical piece. I begin with John Cage’s 4′33″, since it is the most notorious candidate for a silent piece of music, even though it is not, in fact, silent. I conclude that it is not music either, but I argue that it is a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36. Robin M. James (2007). Deconstruction, Fetishism, and the Racial Contract: On the Politics of "Faking It" in Music. CR 7 (1):45-80.
    I read Sara Kofman's work on Nietzsche, Charles Mills' _The Racial Contract_, and Kodwo Eshun's Afrofuturist musicology to argue that most condemnations of "faking it" in music rest on a racially and sexually problematic fetishization of "the real.".
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  60
    Lydia Goehr (1992). The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music. Oxford University Press.
    What is the difference between a performance of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and the symphony itself? What does it mean for musicians to be faithful to the works they perform? To answer this question, Goehr combines philosophical and historical methods of enquiry. She describes how the concept of a musical work emerged as late as 1800, and how it subsequently defined the norms, expectations, and behavior characteristic of classical musical practice. Out of the historical thesis, Goehr draws philosophical conclusions about the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  38.  2
    Sally Ramage (forthcoming). MUSIC-RELATED CRIMINAL OFFENCES. Current Criminal Law 8 (4).
    This article explores the many offences (e.g. noise pollution, unlicensed performances, and Health and Safety offences) that may be committed by personnel in the music industry and their employers. It also explores the many breaches of Intellectual Property law that may be committed by others against the musician’s rights.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  2
    Stéphane Gasparini (2016). Apple Music. La fin de l’histoire? Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (1):97-114.
    Will streaming have a “feedback effect” on musical creation, comparable to the one enforced by the precedent distribution modes of musical contents? In other words, could it be compared to the one generated by the invention of 45rpm vinyl record or 33rpm LP linked to the “concept albums” from the seventies, or even CD and DVD? I will use the description of “Apple Music”, the new Apple streaming site, to demonstrate that the innovations brought along with this site clearly (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  80
    Christopher Bartel (2011). Music Without Metaphysics? British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (4):383-398.
    In a recent pair of articles, Aaron Ridley and Andrew Kania have debated the merits of the study of musical ontology. Ridley contends that the study of musical ontology is orthogonal to more pressing concerns over the value of music. Kania rejects this, arguing that a theory of the value of music must begin with an understanding of the ontology of music. In this essay, I will argue that, despite Kania's rejections, Ridley's criticism exposes a false methodological (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Malcolm Budd (1985). Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    The most fundamental debate in the philosophy of music involves the question of whether there is an artistically important connection between music and the ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  42.  33
    Stephen Davies (2003). Themes in the Philosophy of Music. Oxford University Press.
    Representing Stephen Davies's best shorter writings, these essays outline developments within the philosophy of music over the last two decades, and summarize the state of play at the beginning of a new century. Including two new and previously unpublished pieces, they address both perennial questions and contemporary controversies, such as that over the 'authentic performance' movement, and the impact of modern technology on the presentation and reception of musical works. Rather than attempting to reduce musical works to a single (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  43.  14
    Aaron Ridley, The Philosophy of Music: Theme and Variations.
    Ridley's book is both an introduction to philosophy of music generally and an introduction to an individual, pungently flavoured philosophy of music. His arguments are lively and provocative, and to boot, he writes like a dream. This is the kind of book that reminds one why philosophy matters, especially as applied to the things we love most.-Jerrold Levinson, professor of philosophy, University of Maryland This outstanding book provides new and distinctive approaches to the five central topics of musical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  44.  64
    Michael Luntley (2003). Nonconceptual Content and the Sound of Music. Mind and Language 18 (4):402-426.
    : I present an argument for the existence of nonconceptual representational content. The argument is compatible with McDowell's defence of conceptualism against those arguments for nonconceptual content that draw upon claims about the fine‐grainedness of experience. I present a case for nonconceptual content that concentrates on the idea that experience can possess representational content that cannot perform the function of conceptual content, namely figure in the subject's reasons for belief and action. This sort of argument for nonconceptual content is best (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45.  5
    Steven Pustay (2015). Love's Old Song Will Be New: Deleuze, Busby Berkeley and Becoming-Music. Film-Philosophy 19:172-189.
    This article argues that Busby Berkeley’s unique musical spectacles invert the cinematic taxonomy found in Deleuze’s twin volumes on Cinema through the process of ‘becoming-music.’ By taking up a form that I term ‘visual-music,’ in which musical properties are incorporated within the image, Berkeley’s work problematizes Deleuze’s philosophy of cinematic sound and benefits instead from the conceptions of the musical refrain and rhythm located in Deleuze and Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus. Breaking away from traditional Deleuzian readings of cinema, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  14
    Mark Reybrouck (2011). Music Cognition as a Window to the World. Semiotics:55-62.
    Worldviews are windows to the world. They can be static in referring to visual connotations as suggested by their name, but they can hold a dynamic and genetic view as well. As such, they imply a fundamental cognitive orientation, involving selection, interpretation and interaction with the world. What matters, in this view, is a kind of sense-making or semiotization of the world. -/- The semiotization of the “sonic world”, accordingly, can be approached from different epistemological positions: is music reducible (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  2
    Rhonda Claire Siu (forthcoming). Rethinking the Body and Space in Alfred Schutz’s Phenomenology of Music. Human Studies:1-14.
    What is initially striking about Alfred Schutz’s phenomenological account of the musical experience, which encompasses both the performance and reception of music, is his apparent dismissal of the corporeal and spatial aspects of that experience. The paper argues that this is largely a product of his wider understanding of temporality wherein the mind and time are privileged over the body and space, respectively. While acknowledging that Schutz’s explicit or stated view is that the body and space are relatively insignificant (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  37
    Mark Andrew DeBellis (1995). Music and Conceptualization. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a philosophical study of the relations between hearing and thinking about music. The central problem it addresses is as follows: how is it possible to talk about what a listener perceives in terms that the listener does not recognize? By applying the concepts and techniques of analytic philosophy the author explores the ways in which musical hearing may be described as nonconceptual, and how such mental representation contrasts with conceptual thought. The author is both philosopher and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  49.  24
    Sarah C. Creel & Melanie A. Tumlin (2012). Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information. Cognitive Science 36 (2):224-260.
    Three experiments explored online recognition in a nonspeech domain, using a novel experimental paradigm. Adults learned to associate abstract shapes with particular melodies, and at test they identified a played melody’s associated shape. To implicitly measure recognition, visual fixations to the associated shape versus a distractor shape were measured as the melody played. Degree of similarity between associated melodies was varied to assess what types of pitch information adults use in recognition. Fixation and error data suggest that adults naturally recognize (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  17
    Malgorzata A. Szyszkowska (2010). Messages in Art and Music: On Route to Understanding Musical Works with Jerrold Levinson. Dialogue and Universalism 20 (3-4):97.
    In his article untitled Messages in Art Jerrold Levinson discusses the idea of a message behind a work of art. He argues that despite certain disclaimers put forward by artists it is „hard to deny that artworks (...) very often do have messages, and far from inexpressible ones”. From given examples it would seem that Levinson assumes that musical work just as other artworks sometimes generate messages and that in order for a work of music to be successful in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000