Search results for 'Music and magic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rock Critics Need Bad Music (2004). I Like Bad Music.” That's My Usual Response to People Who Ask Me About My Musi. In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge.score: 210.0
     
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  2. Pop Music (2004). Music Critics and Aestheticians Are, on the Surface, Advocates and Guardians of Good Music. But What Exactly is “Good. In Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.), Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge. 62.score: 210.0
     
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  3. Dane Rudhyar (1982). The Magic of Tone and the Art of Music. Distributed in the United States by Random House.score: 132.0
    Communication: Man's Primordial Need ORGANIC LIFE IN THE EARTH'S biosphere requires organisms to relate to other organisms. Human beings are particularly ...
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  4. Joscelyn Godwin (1987). Music, Mysticism, and Magic: A Sourcebook. Arkana.score: 132.0
     
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  5. Alexandra Kertz-Welzel (2005). The "Magic" of Music: Archaic Dreams in Romantic Aesthetics and an Education in Aesthetics. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):77-94.score: 126.0
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  6. Joyce Eastlund Gromko (2005). In Dialogue: Response to Alexandra Kertz-Wezel, ?The Magic of Music? Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):117-120.score: 126.0
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  7. Joyce Eastlund Gromko (2005). Response to Alexandra Kertz-Wezel, "The Magic of Music&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 13 (1):117-120.score: 126.0
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  8. R. L. Gordon (2007). Balty (J.C.), Boardman (J.), Et Al. (Edd.) Thesaurus Cultus Et Rituum Antiquorum (ThesCRA). 1. Processions. Sacrifices. Libations. Fumigations. Dedications. Pp. Xxii + 612, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-788-7. 2. Purification. Initiation. Heroization. Apotheosis. Banquet. Dance. Music. Cult Images. Pp. Xxii + 646, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-789-4. 3. Divination. Prayer. Veneration. Hikesia. Asylia. Oath. Malediction. Profanation. Magic. Pp. Xviii + 434, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-790-0. 4. Cult Places. Representations of Cult Places. Pp. Xiv + 485, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-791-7. 5. Personnel of Cult. Cult Instruments. Pp. Xx + 502, Ills, Pls. ISBN: 978-0-89236-792-4. 6. Abbreviations. Index of Museums, Collections and Sites. Pp. Xvi + 167. ISBN: 978-0-89236-793-1. Los Angeles: The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2005–2006. Cased, Vols 1–5: £125, €180, US$225 Per Volume, Vol. 6: £40, €60, US$90. ISBN for the Set: 978-0-89236-787-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (2):514-517.score: 120.0
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  9. Ian Bostridge (2000). Music, Reason, and Politeness: Magic and Witchcraft in the Career of George Fredric Handel. In Peter Burke & Brian Harrison (eds.), Civil Histories: Essays Presented to Sir Keith Thomas. Oup Oxford.score: 120.0
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  10. Bryan W. Monahan (1971). Mystery, Magic, Music and Metaphysics. Sydney,Tidal Publications.score: 120.0
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  11. Laurence Wuidar (ed.) (2010). Music and Esotericism. Brill.score: 78.0
     
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  12. Rae Langton (2000). 1 The Musical, the Magical, and the Mathematical Soul1. In Tim Crane & Sarah Patterson (eds.), History of the Mind-Body Problem. New York: Routledge. 13.score: 40.0
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  13. Deborah Bradley (2009). Oh, That Magic Feeling! Multicultural Human Subjectivity, Community, and Fascism's Footprints. Philosophy of Music Education Review 17 (1):56-74.score: 36.0
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  14. Marja Heimonen (2009). Response to Deborah Bradley, “Oh, That Magic Feeling! Multicultural Human Subjectivity, Community, and Fascism's Footprints”. Philosophy of Music Education Review 17 (1):85-89.score: 36.0
  15. Robin James (2011). Feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'. In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.score: 24.0
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations (...)
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  16. Deryck Cooke (1959/1990). The Language of Music. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    First published in 1959, this original study argues that the main characteristic of music is that it expresses and evokes emotion, and that all composers whose music has a tonal basis have used the same, or closely similar, melodic phrases, harmonies, and rhythms to affect the listener in the same ways. He supports this view with hundreds of musical examples, ranging from plainsong to Stravinsky, and contends that music is a language in the specific sense that we (...)
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  17. Roger Scruton (1999). The Aesthetics of Music. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    What is music, what is its value, and what does it mean? In this stimulating volume, Roger Scruton offers a comprehensive account of the nature and significance of music from the perspective of modern philosophy. The study begins with the metaphysics of sound. Scruton distinguishes sound from tone; analyzes rhythm, melody, and harmony; and explores the various dimensions of musical organization and musical meaning. Taking on various fashionable theories in the philosophy and theory of music, he presents (...)
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  18. Patrik N. Juslin & Daniel Västfjäll (2008). Emotional Responses to Music: The Need to Consider Underlying Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):559-575.score: 24.0
    Research indicates that people value music primarily because of the emotions it evokes. Yet, the notion of musical emotions remains controversial, and researchers have so far been unable to offer a satisfactory account of such emotions. We argue that the study of musical emotions has suffered from a neglect of underlying mechanisms. Specifically, researchers have studied musical emotions without regard to how they were evoked, or have assumed that the emotions must be based on the mechanism for emotion induction, (...)
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  19. Robert F. Easley (2005). Ethical Issues in the Music Industry Response to Innovation and Piracy. Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):163 - 168.score: 24.0
    The current conflict between the recording industry and a portion of its customers who are involved in illicit copying of music files arose from innovations involving the compression and electronic distribution of files over the internet. This paper briefly describes some of the challenges faced by the recording industry, and examines some of the ethical issues that arise in various industry and consumer responses to the opportunities and threats presented by these innovations. The paper concludes by highlighting the risks (...)
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  20. Jerrold Levinson (2009). Philosophy and Music. Topoi 28 (2):119-123.score: 24.0
    This essay explores some aspects of the relation between philosophy and music. First, how music can inspire philosophy; second, how philosophy can inspire music. Mathematics as a middle term between music and philosophy, the idea of wholeness in a musical composition or a philosophical text, music as a mode of thought displaying traits such as logic, coherence, and sense—these are some ways in which music and philosophy may be seen to be connected. Also, composers (...)
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  21. Andrew Kania, The Philosophy of Music. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    This is an overview of analytic philosophy of music. It is in five sections, as follows: 1. What Is Music? 2. Musical Ontology 3. Music and the Emotions 4. Understanding Music 5. Music and Value.
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  22. Peter Kivy (2002). Introduction to a Philosophy of Music. Clarendon Press.score: 24.0
    Philosophy of music has flourished in the last thirty years, with great advances made in the understanding of the nature of music and its aesthetics. Peter Kivy has been at the center of this flourishing, and now offers his personal introduction to philosophy of music, a clear and lively explanation of how he sees the most important and interesting philosophical issues relating to music. Anyone interested in music will find this a stimulating introduction to some (...)
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  23. Robin M. James (2007). Deconstruction, Fetishism, and the Racial Contract: On the Politics of "Faking It" in Music. CR 7 (1):45-80.score: 24.0
    I read Sara Kofman's work on Nietzsche, Charles Mills' _The Racial Contract_, and Kodwo Eshun's Afrofuturist musicology to argue that most condemnations of "faking it" in music rest on a racially and sexually problematic fetishization of "the real.".
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  24. Julian Dodd (2007). Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction -- The type/token theory introduced -- Motivating the type/token theory : repeatability -- Nominalist approaches to the ontology of music -- Musical anti-realism -- The type/token theory elaborated -- Types I : abstract, unstructured, unchanging -- Types introduced and nominalism repelled -- Types as abstracta -- Types as unstructured entities -- Types as fixed and unchanging -- Types II : platonism -- Introduction : eternal existence and timelessness -- Types and properties -- The eternal existence of properties reconsidered (...)
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  25. Jenefer Robinson (ed.) (1997). Music & Meaning. Cornell University Press.score: 24.0
    In order to promote new ways of thinking about musical meaning, this volume brings together scholars in music theory, musicology, and the philosophy of music, ...
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  26. Malcolm Budd (1985). Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 24.0
    The most fundamental debate in the philosophy of music involves the question of whether there is an artistically important connection between music and the ...
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  27. Andrew Kania (2010). Silent Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):343-353.score: 24.0
    In this essay, I investigate musical silence. I first discuss how to integrate the concept of silence into a general theory or definition of music. I then consider the possibility of an entirely silent musical piece. I begin with John Cage’s 4′33″, since it is the most notorious candidate for a silent piece of music, even though it is not, in fact, silent. I conclude that it is not music either, but I argue that it is a (...)
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  28. Andrew Geeves, Doris J. F. McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2013). To Think or Not To Think: The Apparent Paradox of Expert Skill in Music Performance. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-18.score: 24.0
    Expert skill in music performance involves an apparent paradox. On stage, expert musicians are required accurately to retrieve information that has been encoded over hours of practice. Yet they must also remain open to the demands of the ever-changing situational contingencies with which they are faced during performance. To further explore this apparent paradox and the way in which it is negotiated by expert musicians, this article profiles theories presented by Roger Chaffin, Hubert Dreyfus and Tony and Helga Noice. (...)
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  29. Leonard B. Meyer (1956). Emotion and Meaning in Music. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Analyzes the meaning expressed in music, the social and psychological sources of meaning, and the methods of musical communication This is a book meant for ...
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  30. Christopher Bartel (2011). Music Without Metaphysics? British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (4):383-398.score: 24.0
    In a recent pair of articles, Aaron Ridley and Andrew Kania have debated the merits of the study of musical ontology. Ridley contends that the study of musical ontology is orthogonal to more pressing concerns over the value of music. Kania rejects this, arguing that a theory of the value of music must begin with an understanding of the ontology of music. In this essay, I will argue that, despite Kania's rejections, Ridley's criticism exposes a false methodological (...)
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  31. Andrew Bowie (2007). Music, Philosophy, and Modernity. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Modern philosophers generally assume that music is a problem to which philosophy ought to offer an answer. Andrew Bowie’s Music, Philosophy, and Modernity suggests, in contrast, that music might offer ways of responding to some central questions in modern philosophy. Bowie looks at key philosophical approaches to music ranging from Kant, through the German Romantics and Wagner, to Wittgenstein, Heidegger and Adorno. He uses music to re-examine many current ideas about language, subjectivity, metaphysics, truth, and (...)
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  32. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Recognizing Emotion in Music (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Six).score: 24.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: How do we recognize distinct types of emotion in music?
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  33. Lydia Goehr (1998/2002). The Quest for Voice: On Music, Politics, and the Limits of Philosophy: The 1997 Ernest Bloch Lectures. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Concentrating on the music, politics, and philosophy of Richard Wagner, Lydia Goehr addresses some fundamental questions of German Romanticism: Is all music musical? Is music made less musical by the presence of words? What is musical autonomy? How do composers avoid censorship? How are composers affected by exile? Can music articulate a 'politics for the future'? What is the relation between music and philosophy?
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  34. Cynthia R. Nielsen (2009). “What Has Coltrane to Do With Mozart: The Dynamism and Built-in Flexibility of Music”. Expositions 3:57-71.score: 24.0
    Although contemporary Western culture and criticism has usually valued composition over improvisation and placed the authority of a musical work with the written text rather than the performer, this essay posits these divisions as too facile to articulate the complex dynamics of making music in any genre or form. Rather it insists that music should be understood as pieces that are created with specific intentions by composers but which possess possibilities of interpretation that can only be brought out (...)
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  35. Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
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  36. Tom Cochrane (2010). Using the Persona to Express Complex Emotions in Music. Music Analysis 29 (1-3):264-275.score: 24.0
  37. W. A. Mathieu (2010). Bridge of Waves: What Music is and How Listening to It Changes the World. Shambhala.score: 24.0
    The music in here--. Music as body ; Music as mind ; Music as heart ; Feeling mind, thinking heart -- --out there--. Music as life ; Music as story ; Music as mirror -- --and everywhere--. Music on the Zen elevator ; The enlightened listener ; Living the waves.
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  38. Andrew Geeves, Doris Mcllwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2010). Expanding Expertise: Investigating a Musician’s Experience of Music Performance. ASCS09: Proceedings of the 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science:106-113.score: 24.0
    Seeking to expand on previous theories, this paper explores the AIR (Applying Intelligence to the Reflexes) approach to expert performance previously outlined by Geeves, Christensen, Sutton and McIlwain (2008). Data gathered from a semi-structured interview investigating the performance experience of Jeremy Kelshaw (JK), a professional musician, is explored. Although JK’s experience of music performance contains inherently uncertain elements, his phenomenological description of an ideal performance is tied to notions of vibe, connection and environment. The dynamic nature of music (...)
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  39. Jyh-Shen Chiou, Chien-yi Huang & Hsin-hui Lee (2005). The Antecedents of Music Piracy Attitudes and Intentions. Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):161 - 174.score: 24.0
    Piracy is the greatest threat facing the music industry worldwide today. This study developed and empirically tested a model examining the antecedents of consumer attitude and behavioral intention toward music piracy behavior. Two types of music piracy behavior, unauthorized duplication/download and pirated music product purchasing, were examined. Based on a field survey in Taiwan, the results showed that attributive satisfaction, perceived prosecution risk, magnitude of consequence, and social consensus are very important in influencing customers attitude and (...)
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  40. Christopher Washburne & Maiken Derno (eds.) (2004). Bad Music: The Music We Love to Hate. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Why are some popular musical forms and performers universally reviled by critics and ignored by scholars-despite enjoying large-scale popularity? How has the notion of what makes "good" or "bad" music changed over the years-and what does this tell us about the writers who have assigned these tags to different musical genres? Many composers that are today part of the classical "canon" were greeted initially by bad reviews. Similarly, jazz, country, and pop musics were all once rejected as "bad" by (...)
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  41. Shoshana Altschuller & Raquel Benbunan-Fich (2009). Is Music Downloading the New Prohibition? What Students Reveal Through an Ethical Dilemma. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (1):49-56.score: 24.0
    Although downloading music through unapproved channels is illegal, statistics indicate that it is widespread. The following study examines the attitudes and perceptions of college students that are potentially engaged in music downloading. The methodology includes a content analysis of the recommendations written to answer an ethical vignette. The vignette presented the case of a subject who faces the dilemma of whether or not to download music illegally. Analyses of the final reports indicate that there is a vast (...)
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  42. Lydia Goehr (1992). The Imaginary Museum of Musical Works: An Essay in the Philosophy of Music. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    What is the difference between a performance of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and the symphony itself? What does it mean for musicians to be faithful to the works they perform? To answer this question, Goehr combines philosophical and historical methods of enquiry. She describes how the concept of a musical work emerged as late as 1800, and how it subsequently defined the norms, expectations, and behavior characteristic of classical musical practice. Out of the historical thesis, Goehr draws philosophical conclusions about the (...)
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  43. Fadlou Shehadi (1995). Philosophies of Music in Medieval Islam. E.J. Brill.score: 24.0
    This surveys the philosophies of music of the most important thinkers in Islam between the 9th and the 15th centuries A.D. It covers topics ranging from the ...
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  44. Joel Krueger (2011). Doing Things with Music. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):1-22.score: 24.0
    This paper is an exploration of how we do things with music—that is, the way that we use music as an esthetic technology to enact micro-practices of emotion regulation, communicative expression, identity construction, and interpersonal coordination that drive core aspects of our emotional and social existence. The main thesis is: from birth, music is directly perceived as an affordance-laden structure. Music, I argue, affords a sonic world, an exploratory space or nested acoustic environment that further affords (...)
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  45. Jerrold Levinson (2011). Music, Art, and Metaphysics. Oup Oxford.score: 24.0
    This is a long-awaited reissue of Jerrold Levinson's 1990 book which gathers together the writings that made him a leading figure in contemporary aesthetics. These highly influential essays are essential reading for debates on the definition of art, the ontology of art, emotional response to art, expression in art, and the nature of art forms.
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  46. Eero Tarasti (2002). Signs of Music: A Guide to Musical Semiotics. Mouton De Gruyter.score: 24.0
    Music is said to be the most autonomous and least representative of all the arts.
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  47. Kathleen Marie Higgins (2012). The Music Between Us: Is Music a Universal Language? The University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Other people's music -- Musical animals -- What's involved in sounding human? -- Cross-cultural understanding -- The music of language -- Musical synesthesia -- A song in your heart -- Comfort and joy -- Beyond ethnocentrism.
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  48. R. A. Sharpe (2000). Music and Humanism: An Essay in the Aesthetics of Music. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Robert Sharpe examines the humanist conception of music as a language--as expressive and intelligible--which has been a dominant theory in Western culture. He argues against the view that music is expressive by causing certain states in us. Rather, he contends that our beliefs about music are integral to our appreciation of it. Differences in musical taste are then not just irresolvable differences in sensitivity, but the result of variations in circumstance and upbringing, of associations and ideology.
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  49. Bruce Ellis Benson (2003). The Improvisation of Musical Dialogue: A Phenomenology of Music. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book is an important contribution to the philosophy of music. Whereas most books in this field focus on the creation and reproduction of music, Bruce Benson's concern is the phenomenology of music making as an activity. He offers the radical thesis that it is improvisation that is primary in the moment of music making. Succinct and lucid, the book brings together a wide range of musical examples from classical music, jazz, early music and (...)
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  50. Nicholas Cook (1990). Music, Imagination, and Culture. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Drawing on psychological and philosophical materials as well as the analysis of specific musical examples, Cook here defines the difference between music...
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