Search results for 'Mythology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  18
    Edward Allen Beach (1994). The Potencies of God(S): Schelling's Philosophy of Mythology. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the metaphysical, epistemological, and hermeneutical theories of Schelling’s final system concerning the nature and meaning of religious mythology.
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  2.  18
    Vladimir L. Marchenkov (2004). Mythos and Logos in Losev's Absolute Mythology. Studies in East European Thought 56 (2-3):173-186.
    The paper analyses A.F. Losev''s argument forthe identity of dialectical and mythicalthinking which forms the key part of his theoryof absolute mythology. Losev claims thatdialectical thinking is limited byphenomenological intuition. He fails torecognise, however, that this intuition itselfis a product of thinking. The same is true ofLosev''s concept of `life'' that is designed tolimit intellectual reflection. The mystery ofthe Absolute is, contrary to Losev''s claim, nota threshold that dialectical thinking cannotcross, but it is, in fact, realised only bysuch thinking. (...)
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  3.  5
    Codruta Cuceu (2010). Lucian Boia, The Scientific Mythology of Communism. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (13):179-181.
    Lucian Boia, The Scientific Mythology of Communism Bucharest, Humanitas Publishing House, 2005.
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  4.  3
    Nonka Bogomilova (2009). A Philosophical Approach to the 'Religion - National Mythology' Synthesis. Filozofija I Društvo 20 (3):83-96.
    The paper analyses the philosophical aspects of the 'religion - national mythology' synthesis. The main directions of the study are as follows: 1. Both on the individual and social plan, the orientation of the transcending universalizing power of religion could vary depending on the macro-social movements a community /or an individual/ is involved in. For the individual as for the community, religion could be a cultural position transcending ego and ethno-centrism, mono-cultural tendencies; in situations of internal differentiation and disintegration (...)
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  5.  15
    Luc Brisson (2004). How Philosophers Saved Myths: Allegorical Interpretation and Classical Mythology. University of Chicago Press.
    This study explains how the myths of Greece and Rome were transmitted from antiquity to the Renaissance. Luc Brisson argues that philosophy was ironically responsible for saving myth from historical annihilation. Although philosophy was initially critical of myth because it could not be declared true or false and because it was inferior to argumentation, mythology was progressively reincorporated into philosophy through allegorical exegesis. Brisson shows to what degree allegory was employed among philosophers and how it enabled myth to take (...)
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  6. Jamake Highwater (1997). The Mythology of Transgression: Homosexuality as Metaphor. Oxford University Press.
    Jamake Highwater is a master storyteller and one of our most visionary writers, hailed as "an eloquent bard, whose words are fire and glory" (Studs Terkel) and "a writer of exceptional vision and power" (Ana"is Nin). Author of more than thirty volumes of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, Highwater--considered by many to be the intellectual heir of Joseph Campbell--has long been intrigued by how our mythological legacies have served as a foundation of modern civilization. Now, in The Mythology of Transgression, (...)
     
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  7. Kevin J. Sharpe (1984). From Science to an Adequate Mythology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  8.  10
    W. Hansen (1999). Foam-Born Aphrodite and the Mythology of Transformation. American Journal of Philology 121 (1):1-19.
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  9.  3
    John M. Robertson (1902). Christianity and Mythology. The Monist 12:145.
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  10.  1
    W. U. Xiaoming (2012). The End of the Supersensory World's Mythology: Marx's Ontological Revolution and Its Contemporary Significance. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (1):128-141.
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  11. W. Munro Taylor (1870). A Hand-Book of Hindu Mythology and Philosophy with Some Biographical Notices. Higginbotham and Co.
     
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  12. Brian Collins (2014). The Head Beneath the Altar: Hindu Mythology and the Critique of Sacrifice. Michigan State University Press.
    In the beginning, says the ancient Hindu text the _Rg Veda_, was man. And from man’s sacrifice and dismemberment came the entire world, including the hierarchical ordering of human society. _The Head Beneath the Altar _is the first book to present a wide-ranging study of Hindu texts read through the lens of René Girard’s mimetic theory of the sacrificial origin of religion and culture. For those interested in Girard and comparative religion, the book also performs a careful reading of Girard’s (...)
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  13.  33
    Bruce Matthews (2015). Schelling in the Anthropocene: A New Mythology of Nature. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 19 (1):94-105.
    I explore how the "synthesis of history and nature" that defines the Anthropocene might signal the advent of the “new mythology” Schelling hoped would emerge from his Naturphilosophie. The epistemological dimension of this new mythology is to be understood through Schelling’s idea of Mitwissenschaft, in which humanity is the essential active agent in the reflexive system of the world. Such an inquiry derives not from a sentimental longing for an enchanted world, but from the impending “annihilation of nature” (...)
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  14.  7
    Dowin H. Boatright & Jean Abbott (2013). Not Your Typical Frequent Flyer: Overcoming Mythology in Caring for Sickle Cell Disease Patients. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (4):18 - 20.
    (2013). Not Your Typical Frequent Flyer: Overcoming Mythology in Caring for Sickle Cell Disease Patients. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 18-20. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2013.767963.
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  15.  29
    Markus Gabriel (2009). Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism. Continuum.
    A hugely important book that rediscovers three crucial, but long overlooked themes in German idealism: mythology, madness and laughter.
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  16.  6
    David A. Granger (2008). No Child Left Behind and the Spectacle of Failing Schools: The Mythology of Contemporary School Reform. Educational Studies 43 (3):206-228.
    This article discusses what David Berliner (2005) has called the perverse ?spectacle of fear? (208) surrounding issues of teacher quality and accountability in contemporary school reform. Drawing principally on the critical semiotics of Roland Barthes' essay, ?The World of Wrestling? (1957), it examines the way that this spectacle works to undermine public education and explicates the powerful mythology behind it. The article then concludes with some suggestions on how this destructive ?spectacle of fear? might potentially be disrupted using the (...)
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  17. Cornelia Dimmitt (1978). Classical Hindu Mythology: A Reader in the Sanskrit Puranas. Temple University Press.
    The Mahapuranas embody the received tradition of Hindu mythology. This anthology contains fresh translations of these myths, only a few of which have ever been available in English before, thus providing a rich new portion of Hindu mythology. The book is organized into six chapters. "Origins" contains myths relating to creation, time, and space. "Seers, Kings and Supernaturals" relates tales of rivers, trees, animals, demons, and men, particularly heroes and sages. Myths about the chief gods are dealt with (...)
     
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  18.  16
    Silvia Manzo (1999). Holy Writ, Mythology, and the Foundations of Francis Bacon's Principle of the Constancy of Matter. Early Science and Medicine 4 (114):126.
    The exact nature of the relation between science and Scripture in the thought of Francis Bacon is a well-studied but controversial field. In this paper, it is shown that Bacon, though convinced that there exists no enmity between the book of God's wisdom and the book of God's power , usually tries to separate knowledge acquired by reason from knowledge acquired by faith . In his exposition of the principle of the conservation of matter, however, Bacon seems to find himself (...)
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  19.  29
    Joachim Schulte (1988). World-Picture and Mythology. Inquiry 31 (3):323 – 334.
    Partly by way of contrast with a conception described by Kleist, Wittgenstein's notions of world?picture and mythology are explained and three types of statement playing a particularly important role with respect to our world?picture or pictures distinguished. Problems concerning sentences which contain normative elements are discussed and a test for what to count as a statement giving information about our world?picture is proposed. A mythology in Wittgenstein's sense is characterized as a structured, systematic set of models permitting analogical (...)
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  20.  39
    Melissa Conroy (2010). Treating Transgendered Children: Clinical Methods and Religious Mythology. Zygon 45 (2):301-316.
    Bruce Lincoln suggests that myth is "that small class of stories that possess both credibility and authority". When studying the history of mythology we find that myths often are understood as something other people have—as if the group in question possesses the truth while others live by falsehoods. In examining contemporary North American society, we can see how Judeo-Christian narratives structure popular and medical discourses regarding sex and gender. The idea that humans are born into male and female, and (...)
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  21.  2
    Filippo Fontanelli (2016). The Mythology of Proportionality in Judgments of the Court of Justice of the European Union on Internet and Fundamental Rights. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 36 (3):630-660.
    Proportionality is the tool of choice for the EU Court of Justice’s review of measures affecting the enjoyment of fundamental rights. The use of proportionality is normally beneficial, as it ensures that public authorities pursue public policies without any avoidable waste of fundamental rights protection. In the field of internet-based activities, however, certain recurrent elements make proportionality unfit for the purpose. This article argues against the systematic recourse to the mythology of proportionality in the judgments of the Court of (...)
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  22.  7
    Stephen Sheard (2005). White Mythology. Philosophy of Management 5 (1):67-84.
    This article examines the development of the concept of the value chain from the linear to the virtual conception of the chain, through the evolution of the literature from Michael Porter’s writings of the mid 1990s to the theorists of e-business and e-commerce in the later 1990s I argue that Porter’s account employs white metaphors and that writings on the virtual value chain both extend the white metaphors of Porter’s linear chain, and suggest a pronouncedly metaphysical system of thought – (...)
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  23.  3
    Leandro Drivet (2014). Materiality, Time and Desire: the Criticism of Christian Mythology in León Rozitchner's Work. Alpha (Osorno) 39:143-161.
    Este texto aborda la última parte de la producción teórica de León Rozitchner, en donde se tematiza el mito estructurante de nuestra cultura: el cristianismo. Mediante una interpretación freudiana de las Confesiones de San Agustín, Rozitchner retoma con originalidad la idea marxista que considera a la crítica de la religión como el presupuesto de toda crítica. Se ponen de relieve los núcleos religiosos encubiertos en la secularización moderna que el capitalismo obstaculiza y se arriba a una idea de cuerpo que (...)
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  24. C. G. Jung & Carl Kerényi (1969). Essays on a Science of Mythology: The Myth of the Divine Child and the Mysteries of Eleusis. Princeton University Press.
    Essays on a Science of Mythology is a cooperative work between C. Kerényi, who has been called "the most psychological of mythologists," and C. G. Jung, who has been called "the most mythological of psychologists." Kerényi contributes an essay on the Divine Child and one on the Kore, together with a substantial introduction and conclusion. Jung contributes a psychological commentary on each essay. Both men hoped, through their collaboration, to elevate the study of mythology to the status of (...)
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  25.  3
    Burton L. Mack (1970). Wisdom Myth and Mythology An Essay in Understanding a Theological Tradition. Interpretation 24 (1):46-60.
    The burning question of theodicy, raised by the cruel realities of the exile and its aftermath, drove the wisdom schools to creative theological work. By using the graphic language of wisdom mythology, the affirmation of Yahweh's lordship over the entire order of creation is made in such a way that the exile can now be seen to demand faith rather than resignation.
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  26. Randy Bancroft (2000). Schrödinger's Cat & the Golden Bough: Reflections on Science, Mythology and Magic. Upa.
    Schrödinger's Cat & The Golden Bough addresses the relationship between science and mythology from the starting points of Frazer's The Golden Bough and Erwin Schrödinger's famous cat. From the Greek origins of modern scientific thought, Bancroft traces the intertwining and separation of mythology, magic, and science through the ages. Drawing on psychology, mythology, literature, and history of science, the author, a physicist who works with electromagnetic Field Theory, presents a fascinating and provocative cross-disciplinary study.
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  27. Edward Allen Beach (1994). The Potencies of God: Schelling's Philosophy of Mythology. State University of New York Press.
    _Explores the metaphysical, epistemological, and hermeneutical theories of Schelling’s final system concerning the nature and meaning of religious mythology._.
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  28. C. G. Jung & C. Kerenyi (2001). The Science of Mythology: Essays on the Myth of the Divine Child and the Mysteries of Eleusis. Routledge.
    When Carl Jung and Carl Kerenyi got together to collaborate on this book, their aim was to elevate the study of mythology to a science. Kerenyi wrote on two of the most ubiquitous myths, the Divine Child and The Maiden, supporting the core 'stories' with both an introduction and a conclusion. Jung then provided a psychological analysis of both myths. He defined myth as a story about heroes interacting with the gods. Having long studied dreams and the subconscious, Jung (...)
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  29. Robert E. Norton (ed.) (2009). Nietzsche: Attempt at a Mythology. University of Illinois Press.
    First published in 1918, Ernst Bertram's _Nietzsche: Attempt at a Mythology_ substantially shaped the image of Nietzsche for the generation between the wars. It won the Nietzsche Society's first prize and was admired by luminous contemporaries including André Gide, Hermann Hesse, Gottfried Benn, and Thomas Mann. Although translated into French in 1932, the book was never translated into English following the decline of Nietzsche's and Bertram's reputations after 1945. Now, with Nietzsche's importance for twentieth-century thought undisputed, the work by one (...)
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  30. Catherine Tihanyi (ed.) (2004). How Philosophers Saved Myths: Allegorical Interpretation and Classical Mythology. University of Chicago Press.
    This study explains how the myths of Greece and Rome were transmitted from antiquity to the Renaissance. Luc Brisson argues that philosophy was ironically responsible for saving myth from historical annihilation. Although philosophy was initially critical of myth because it could not be declared true or false and because it was inferior to argumentation, mythology was progressively reincorporated into philosophy through allegorical exegesis. Brisson shows to what degree allegory was employed among philosophers and how it enabled myth to take (...)
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  31. Catherine Tihanyi (ed.) (2008). How Philosophers Saved Myths: Allegorical Interpretation and Classical Mythology. University of Chicago Press.
    In this concise but wide-ranging study, Luc Brisson describes how the myths of Greece and Rome were transmitted from antiquity to the Renaissance. He argues that philosophy was responsible for saving myth from historical annihilation. Although philosophy was initially critical of myth, mythology was progressively reincorporated into philosophy through allegory. Brisson reveals how philosophers employed allegory and how it enabled myth to take on a number of different interpretive systems throughout the centuries: moral, physical, psychological, political, and even metaphysical. (...)
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  32. Apollodorus . (2008). The Library of Greek Mythology. Oxford University Press Uk.
    A new translation of an important text for Greek mythology used as a source book by classicists from antiquity to Robert Graves, The Library of Greek Mythology is a complete summary of early Greek myth. Using the ancient system of detailed histories of the great families, it contains invaluable genealogical diagrams for maximum clarity. The introduction gives details of sources and narrative traditions, and there is comprehensive annotation. An indispensable reference work for anyone interested in classical mythology.
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  33.  4
    Michael Loughlin (2002). Ethics, Management, and Mythology: Rational Decision Making for Health Service Professionals. Radcliffe Medical Press.
    Chapter 1 Who this book is for and who it is not for1 There are already too many books offering solutions to the problems of the health service. ...
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  34. Don Howard (2004). Who Invented the “Copenhagen Interpretation”? A Study in Mythology. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):669-682.
    What is commonly known as the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, regarded as representing a unitary Copenhagen point of view, differs significantly from Bohr's complementarity interpretation, which does not employ wave packet collapse in its account of measurement and does not accord the subjective observer any privileged role in measurement. It is argued that the Copenhagen interpretation is an invention of the mid‐1950s, for which Heisenberg is chiefly responsible, various other physicists and philosophers, including Bohm, Feyerabend, Hanson, and Popper, having (...)
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  35. J. H. Randall Jr (1919). Instrumentalism and Mythology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (12):309-324.
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  36. Mark Schroeder (2005). Instrumental Mythology. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 1 (2).
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  37.  79
    Michael Loughlin, George Lewith & Torkel Falkenberg (2013). Science, Practice and Mythology: A Definition and Examination of the Implications of Scientism in Medicine. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (2):130-145.
    Scientism is a philosophy which purports to define what the world ‘really is’. It adopts what the philosopher Thomas Nagel called ‘an epistemological criterion of reality’, defining what is real as that which can be discovered by certain quite specific methods of investigation. As a consequence all features of experience not revealed by those methods are deemed ‘subjective’ in a way that suggests they are either not real, or lie beyond the scope of meaningful rational inquiry. This devalues capacities that (...)
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  38.  21
    John Turri (2011). Mythology of the Factive. Logos and Episteme 2 (1):143-152.
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  39.  62
    S. J. Scott (1974). The Romantic Mythology of Language. Diogenes 22 (86):111-132.
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  40. David E. Cooper (1996). Modern Mythology: The Case of 'Reactionary Modernism'. History of the Human Sciences 9 (2):25-37.
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  41. B. Juillerat (1988). "An Odor of Man": Melanesian Evolutionism, Anthropological Mythology and Matriarchy. Diogenes 36 (144):65-91.
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  42. Wendy Doniger (2004). The Mythology of Masquerading Animals, or, Bestial Myths: Religious Constructions of Relationships Between Humans and Animals. Social Research: An International Quarterly 71 (3):711-732.
     
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  43. Ralph Lieberman (1991). Real Architecture, Imaginary History: The Arsenale Gate as Venetian Mythology. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 54:117-126.
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  44.  74
    Ernest Sosa (1997). Mythology of the Given. History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (3):275 - 286.
  45.  96
    J. Starobinski & J. C. Gage (1998). Dead World, Living Hearts: Elements of Romantic Mythology. Diogenes 46 (182):89-108.
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  46. M. Eliade (1955). Mythology and the History of Religions: Mitie E Leggende by Raffaele Pettazzoni Vol. I, Africa-Australia; Vol. III, America Settentrionale. Turin: Unione Tipografica Editrice Torinese, 1948, 1953. Pp. XXVII+480; XVIII + 576. La Religion Dans la Grece Antique, Des Origine a Alexandre le Grand by Raffaele Pettazzoni Translated by Jean Gouillard. Paris: Payot, 1953. Pp. 268. (Original Edition: La Religione Nella Grecia Antica Fino Ad Alessandro. Bologna, Zanichelli, 1921. Pp. XII + 416.) La Religion Populaire Dans la Grece Antique by Martin P. Nilsson Translated by Frans Durif. Paris: Plon, 1954. Pp. 245. (Original Edition: Greek Popular Religion. New York: Columbia University Press, 1940. Pp. XVII + 166.) Cenese de L'Odyssee. Le Fantastique Et le Sacre by Gabriel Germain Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1954. Pp. 700. [REVIEW] Diogenes 3 (9):96-113.
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  47. F. W. J. Schelling & Jason M. Wirth (2007). Historical-Critical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mythology. State University of New York Press.
    Appearing in English for the first time, Schelling’s 1842 lectures develop the idea that many philosophical concepts are born of religious-mythological notions.
     
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  48. James Feibleman (1944). The Mythology of Science. Philosophy of Science 11 (2):117-121.
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  49.  6
    Michael Loughlin (1995). Bioethics and the Mythology of Liberalism. Health Care Analysis 3 (4):315-323.
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  50.  2
    Federico Finchelstein (2016). Truth, Mythology and the Fascist Unconscious. Constellations 23 (2):223-235.
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