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  1. David Rönnegard & N. Craig Smith (2013). Shareholders Vs. Stakeholders. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 32 (3/4):183-220.
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  2. Allan J. Kimmel, N. Craig Smith & Jill Gabrielle Klein (2011). Ethical Decision Making and Research Deception in the Behavioral Sciences: An Application of Social Contract Theory. Ethics and Behavior 21 (3):222 - 251.
    Despite significant ethical advances in recent years, including professional developments in ethical review and codification, research deception continues to be a pervasive practice and contentious focus of debate in the behavioral sciences. Given the disciplines' generally stated ethical standards regarding the use of deceptive procedures, researchers have little practical guidance as to their ethical acceptability in specific research contexts. We use social contract theory to identify the conditions under which deception may or may not be morally permissible and formulate practical (...)
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  3. N. Craig Smith, Guido Palazzo & C. B. Bhattacharya (2010). Marketing's Consequences. Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (4):617-641.
    While considerable attention has been given to the harm done to consumers by marketing, less attention has been given to the harm done by consumers as an indirect effect of marketing activities, particularly in regard to supply chains. The recent development of dramatically expanded global supply chains has resulted in social and environmental problems upstream that are attributable at least in part to downstream marketers and consumers. Marketers have responded mainly by using corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication to counter the (...)
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  4. N. Craig Smith & Robert J. Crawford (2008). Unilever and Oxfam: Understanding the Impacts of Business on Poverty (A) and (B). Journal of Business Ethics Education 5:63-112.
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  5. N. Craig Smith & Gilbert Lenssen (2008). Mainstreaming Corporate Responsibility: An Introduction to the Special Issue. Journal of Business Ethics Education 5:59-62.
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  6. N. Craig Smith, Sally S. Simpson & Chun-Yao Huang (2008). Why Managers Fail to Do the Right Thing. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):633-667.
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  7. N. Craig Smith, Sally S. Simpson & Chun-Yao Huang (2007). Why Managers Fail to Do the Right Thing: An Empirical Study of Unethical and Illegal Conduct. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):633-667.
    We combine prior research on ethical decision-making in organizations with a rational choice theory of corporate crime from criminology to develop a model of corporate offending that is tested with a sample of U.S. managers. Despite demands for increased sanctioning of corporate offenders, we find that the threat of legal action does not directly affect the likelihood of misconduct. Managers’ evaluations of the ethics of the act, measured using a multidimensional ethics scale, have a significant effect, as do outcome expectancies (...)
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  8. N. Craig Smith & Robert J. Crawford (2006). The Wal-Mart Supply Chain Controversy. Journal of Business Ethics Education 3:143-164.
    Wal-Mart received widespread praise for its response to Hurricane Katrina when it hit the Louisiana coast in August 2005 and low prices at the world’s largest retailer are estimated to save consumers billions of dollars a year. Nonetheless, it was coming under increasing criticism for corebusiness practices, ranging from detrimental effects on communities when Wal-Mart stores are established, to abusive labour practices, to alleged sourcing from sweatshops. This case looks at the benefits and the potentially harmful consequences of the Wal-Mart (...)
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  9. N. Craig Smith & Anne Duncan (2005). GlaxoSmithKline and Access to Essential Medicines (B). Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (1):123-132.
    The (B) case summarizes GSK’s response to pressures to increase access to essential medicines in developing countries and subsequent developments.
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  10. N. Craig Smith & Anne Duncan (2005). GlaxoSmithKline and Developing Country Access to Essential Medicines (A). Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (1):97-121.
    The merger of GlaxoWellcome and SmithKlineBeecham in 2000 created the world’s second largest pharmaceutical company, GlaxoSmithKline. GSK also became the world’s leader in the provision of drugs to treat the three most critical diseases in the developing world: HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. In addition to merger related strategy and restructuring activities, the company finds itself having to respond to pressures to increase access to these essential medicines in developing countries, including the possibility of major reductions in price. How should GSK (...)
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  11. N. Craig Smith & Michelle Quirk (2004). From Grace to Disgrace. Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):91-130.
    In June 2002, Arthur Andersen LLP became the first accounting firm in history to be criminally convicted. The repercussions were immense. From a position as one of the leading professional services firms in the world, with 85,000 staff in 84 countries and revenues in excess of $9 billion, Andersen effectively ceased to exist within a matter of months. Although Andersen’s conviction related specifically to a charge of obstructing justice, public attention focused on the audit relationship between Andersen and its major (...)
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  12. N. Craig Smith (2001). Ethical Guidelines for Marketing Practice: A Reply to Gaski & Some Observations on the Role of Normative Marketing Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (1):3 - 18.
    Gaski (1999) is critical of marketing ethics and suggests that its ethical guidelines amount to no more than "obey the law" and "act in your self-interest". This reply questions Gaski''s critique and clarifies possible misconceptions about the field that might otherwise result. It identifies the limitations and assumptions of Gaski''s argument and shows that there are exceptions to his central proposition even when narrowly circumscribed. It is not disputed that there is merit to reminding managers of their obligations to obey (...)
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