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N. Hallowell [9]Nina Hallowell [5]
  1. N. Hallowell, A. Hall, C. Alberg & R. Zimmern (forthcoming). Revealing the Results of Whole-Genome Sequencing and Whole-Exome Sequencing in Research and Clinical Investigations: Some Ethical Issues. Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  2. N. Hallowell, S. Chowdhury, A. E. Hall, P. Pharoah, H. Burton & N. Pashayan (2014). What Ethical and Legal Principles Should Guide the Genotyping of Children as Part of a Personalised Screening Programme for Common Cancer? Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):163-167.
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  3. N. Hallowell, S. Cooke, G. Crawford, A. Lucassen, M. Parker & C. Snowdon (2009). An Investigation of Patients' Motivations for Their Participation in Genetics-Related Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (1):37-45.
    Design: Qualitative interview study. Participants: Fifty-nine patients with a family history of cancer who attend a regional cancer genetics clinic in the UK were interviewed about their current and previous research experiences. Findings: Interviewees gave a range of explanations for research participation. These were categorised as (a) social—research participation benefits the wider society by progressing science and improving treatment for everyone; (b) familial—research participation may improve healthcare and benefit current or future generations of the participant’s family; and (c) personal—research participation (...)
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  4. N. Hallowell, S. Cooke, G. Crawford, M. Parker & A. Lucassen (2009). Healthcare Professionals' and Researchers' Understanding of Cancer Genetics Activities: A Qualitative Interview Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):113-119.
    Aims: To describe individuals’ perceptions of the activities that take place within the cancer genetics clinic, the relationships between these activities and how these relationships are sustained. Design: Qualitative interview study. Participants: Forty individuals involved in carrying out cancer genetics research in either a clinical (n = 28) or research-only (n = 12) capacity in the UK. Findings: Interviewees perceive research and clinical practice in the subspecialty of cancer genetics as interdependent. The boundary between research and clinical practice is described (...)
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  5. Nina Hallowell (2009). Consent to Genetic Testing: A Family Affair? In Oonagh Corrigan, John McMillan, Kathleen Liddell, Martin Richards & Charles Weijer (eds.), The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oup Oxford.
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  6. Margaret Ponder, Helen Statham, Nina Hallowell & Martin Richards (2009). Is Consent Sufficient? - a Case Study of Qualitative Research with Men with Intellectual Disabilities. In Oonagh Corrigan, John McMillan, Kathleen Liddell, Martin Richards & Charles Weijer (eds.), The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oup Oxford.
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  7. S. Cooke, G. Crawford, M. Parker, A. Lucassen & N. Hallowell (2008). Recall of Participation in Research Projects in Cancer Genetics: Some Implications for Research Ethics. Clinical Ethics 3 (4):180-184.
    The aim of this study is to assess patients' recall of their previous research participation. Recall was established during interviews and compared with entries from clinical notes. Participants were 49 patients who had previously participated in different types of research. Of the 49 patients, 45 (92%) interviewees recalled 69 of 109 (63%) study participations. Level of recall varied according to the type of research, some participants clearly recalled the details of research aims, giving consent and research procedures. Others recalled procedures (...)
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  8. N. Hallowell, S. Cooke, G. Crawford, M. Parker & A. Lucassen (2008). Ethics and Research Governance: The Views of Researchers, Health-Care Professionals and Other Stakeholders. Clinical Ethics 3 (2):85-90.
    The objective of this study is to describe researchers', health-care providers' and other stakeholders' views of ethical review and research governance procedures. The study design involved qualitative semi-structured interviews. Participants included 60 individuals who either undertook research in the subspecialty of cancer genetics (n = 40) or were involved in biomedical research in other capacities (n = 20), e.g. research governance and oversight, patient support groups or research funding. While all interviewees observed that oversight is necessary to protect research participants, (...)
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  9. Nina Hallowell (2008). Encounters with Medical Professionals: A Crisis of Trust or Matter of Respect? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):427-437.
    In this paper I shed light on the connection between respect, trust and patients’ satisfaction with their medical care. Using data collected in interviews with 49 women who had managed, or were in the process of managing, their risk of ovarian cancer using prophylactic surgery or ovarian screening, I examine their reported dissatisfaction with medical encounters. I argue that although many study participants appeared to mistrust their healthcare professionals’ (HCPs) motives or knowledge base, their dissatisfaction arose not from a lack (...)
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  10. M. Ponder, H. Statham, N. Hallowell, J. A. Moon, M. Richards & F. L. Raymond (2008). Genetic Research on Rare Familial Disorders: Consent and the Blurred Boundaries Between Clinical Service and Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):690-694.
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  11. Nina Hallowell & Julia Lawton (2006). Seeking Ethical Approval: Opening Up the Lines of Communication. Clinical Ethics 1 (2):109-113.
    This paper attempts to open debate about the nature of and need for ethical review of health-related social science research. Drawing upon personal experience and anecdotal reports we describe some of the problems social scientists and ethics committee members may encounter when social science research is reviewed by Multicentre and Local Research Ethics Committees. We argue that the boundary between research methods and ethics is ambiguous and flexible, and that ethics therefore permeates research at all levels from the construction of (...)
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  12. N. Hallowell (2003). Balancing Autonomy and Responsibility: The Ethics of Generating and Disclosing Genetic Information * Commentary * Author's Reply. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):74-79.
  13. Nina Hallowell, Claire Foster, Ros Eeles, A. Ardern-Jones, Veronica Murday & Maggie Watson (2003). Balancing Autonomy and Responsibility: The Ethics of Generating and Disclosing Genetic Information. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):74-79.
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