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  1. N. J. Enfield (2011). Description of Reciprocal Situations in Lao. In Nicholas Evans (ed.), Reciprocals and Semantic Typology. John Benjamins Pub. Company. 98--129.
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  2. Asifa Majid, Christian J. Rapold, Peter Hurst, Ulrike Zeshan, Toshiki Osada, N. J. Enfield, Nicole Kruspe & Niclas Burenhult (2011). Nicholas Evans. In Nicholas Evans (ed.), Reciprocals and Semantic Typology. John Benjamins Pub. Company. 341.
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  3. Jurgen Bohnemeyer, N. J. Enfield, James Essegbey & Sotaro Kita (2010). The Macro-Event Property: The Segmentation of Causal Chains. In Jürgen Bohnemeyer & Eric Pederson (eds.), Event Representation in Language and Cognition. Cambridge University Press.
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  4. N. J. Enfield (2010). Gesturecraft: The Manu-Facture of Meaning. Pragmatics and Cognition 18 (2):465-467.
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  5. N. J. Enfield (2008). Language as Shaped by Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):519-520.
    Language is shaped by its environment, which includes not only the brain, but also the public context in which speech acts are effected. To fully account for why language has the shape it has, we need to examine the constraints imposed by language use as a sequentially organized joint activity, and as the very conduit for linguistic diffusion and change.
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  6. N. J. Enfield (2007). Meanings of the Unmarked: How'default'person Reference Does More Than Just Refer. In N. J. Enfield & Tanya Stivers (eds.), Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural, and Social Perspectives. Cambridge University Press. 97--120.
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  7. N. J. Enfield & Tanya Stivers (eds.) (2007). Person Reference in Interaction: Linguistic, Cultural, and Social Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
    How do we refer to people in everyday conversation? No matter the language or culture, we must choose from a range of options: full name ('Robert Smith'), reduced name ('Bob'), description ('tall guy'), kin term ('my son') etc. Our choices reflect how we know that person in context, and allow us to take a particular perspective on them. This book brings together a team of leading linguists, sociologists and anthropologists to show that there is more to person reference than meets (...)
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  8. N. J. Enfield (2006). Laos–Language Situation. In Keith Brown (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier. 2.
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  9. N. J. Enfield (2004). On Linear Segmentation and Combinatorics in Co-Speech Gesture: A Symmetry-Dominance Construction in Lao Fish Trap Descriptions. Semiotica 2004 (149).
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  10. N. J. Enfield (2002). Avoiding the Exoticisms of “Obstinate Monosemy” and “Online Extension”. Pragmatics and Cognition 10 (1-2):85-106.
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  11. N. J. Enfield (2002). Semantic Analysis of Body Parts in Emotion Terminology: Avoiding the Exoticisms of "Obstinate Monosemy¿ and ¿Online Extension". Pragmatics and Cognition 10 (1):85-106.
    Investigation of the emotions entails reference to words and expressions conventionally used for the description of emotion experience. Important methodological issues arise for emotion researchers, and the issues are of similarly central concern in linguistic semantics more generally. I argue that superficial and/or inconsistent description of linguistic meaning can have seriously misleading results. This paper is firstly a critique of standards in emotion research for its tendency to underrate and ill-understood linguistic semantics. It is secondly a critique of standards in (...)
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  12. N. J. Enfield & Anna Wierzbicka (2002). Introduction: The Body in Description of Emotion. Pragmatics and Cognition 10 (1):1-26.
    Anthropologists and linguists have long been aware that the body is explicitly referred to in conventional description of emotion in languages around the world. There is abundant linguistic data showing expression of emotions in terms of their imagined ¿locus¿ in the physical body. The most important methodological issue in the study of emotions is language, for the ways people talk give us access to ¿folk descriptions¿ of the emotions. ¿Technical terminology¿, whether based on English or otherwise, is not excluded from (...)
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  13. Anna Wierzbicka & N. J. Enfield (2002). The Body in Description of Emotion. Pragmatics and Cognition 10 (1):2.
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