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  1. N. Scott Arnold (2011). Are Modern American Liberals Socialists or Social Democrats? Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (2):262-282.
    This paper answers the title question, “Yes,” on both counts. The first part of the paper argues that modern liberals are socialists, and the second part argues that they are also social democrats. The main idea behind the first argument is that the state has effectively taken control of the incidents of ownership through its taxation, spending, and regulatory policies. The main idea behind the second argument is that the institutions of social democracy are replicated by the institutions favored by (...)
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  2. N. Scott Arnold (2009). Imposing Values: Liberalism and Regulation. Oup Usa.
    Imposing Values provides an even-handed characterization of the differences between modern liberalism and classical liberalism about the proper scope of government. It also systematically and comprehensively discusses arguments for and against various regulatory regimes favored by modern liberals and opposed by classical liberals.
     
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  3. N. Scott Arnold (2009). The Endangered Species Act, Regulatory Takings, and Public Goods. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):353-377.
    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) can impose significant limitations on what landowners may do with their property, especially as it pertains to development. These restrictions imposed by the ESA are part of a larger controversy about the reach of the of the Fifth Amendment, which says that private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation. The question this paper addresses is whether these restrictions require compensation. The paper develops a position on the general question of compensation (...)
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  4. N. Scott Arnold (2000). Book Review. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):333-378.
     
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  5. N. Scott Arnold (2000). Free Markets and Social Justice, Cass Sunstein. Oxford University Press, 1997, VI + 405 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (2):333-378.
  6. N. Scott Arnold (2000). Postmodern Liberalism and the Expressive Function of Law. Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (01):87-.
    In 1992, the city of Boulder, Colorado, passed an ordinance forbidding discrimination against homosexuals in employment and housing. Two years later, voters in the state of Colorado passed a constitutional amendment forbidding the passage of local ordinances prohibiting this form of discrimination. The constitutional amendment did not mandate discrimination against homosexuals; it merely nullified ordinances such as Boulder's. The amendment was later struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court as unconstitutional.
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  7. N. Scott Arnold, Theodore M. Benditt, George Graham, Nikolaos Avgelis, Filimon Peonidis & William Bechtel (1999). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Alcoff, Linda Martin, Epistemology: The Big Questions, Oxford, UK, Blackwell Pub-Lishers, 1998, Pp. 445,£ 15.99. Alexander, Larry (Ed.), Constitutionalism: Philosophical Foundations, Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 1998, Pp. 319,£ 37.50. [REVIEW] Mind 108:429.
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  8. N. Scott Arnold (1998). Affirmative Action and the Demands of Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (02):133-.
    This essay is about the moral and political justification of affirmative action programs in the United States. Both legally and politically, many of these programs are under attack, though they remain ubiquitous. The concern of this essay, however, is not with what the law says but with what it should say. The main argument advanced in this essay concludes that most of the controversial affirmative action programs are unjustified. It proceeds in a way that avoids dependence on controversial theories of (...)
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  9. N. Scott Arnold, Theodore M. Benditt & George Graham (eds.) (1998). Philosophy Then and Now. Blackwell Publishers.
  10. N. Scott Arnold (1992). Andrew Oldenquist and Menachem Rosner, Eds., Alienation, Community, and Work Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 12 (2):128-130.
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  11. N. Scott Arnold (1992). [Book Review] Marx's Radical Critique of Capitalist Society. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (3):171-172.
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  12. N. Scott Arnold (1992). Equality and Exploitation in the Market Socialist Community. Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (01):1-.
    Historically, critics of capitalism have had a great deal to say about the defects and social ills that afflict capitalist society and correspondingly little to say about how alternative institutional arrangements might solve these problems. One can only speculate about why this has been so. One reason might be a simple matter of priorities. Bertolt Brecht once said that when a man's house is on fire, one does not inquire too closely into alternative arrangements for shelter. The analogy between capitalism (...)
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  13. N. Scott Arnold (1992). Market Socialism. Critical Review 6 (4):517-557.
    Can market socialism realize the socialist vision of the good society by ending exploitation and alienation, substantially reducing inequalities of wealth and income, ensuring full employment, and correcting other market irrationalities? A comparative analysis of the organizational forms of capitalism (notably the small owner?operated firm and the large corporation) and market socialism (the self?managed cooperative that rents its capital from the state) reveals the relative efficiencies of capitalism in reducing transaction costs, in turn reducing the opportunities for exploitation. By contrast, (...)
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  14. N. Scott Arnold (1990). Economists and Philosophers as Critics of the Free Enterprise System. The Monist 73 (4):621-641.
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  15. N. Scott Arnold (1990). Marx's Radical Critique of Capitalist Society a Reconstruction and Critical Evaluation. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  16. N. Scott Arnold (1989). Marx, Central Planning, and Utopian Socialism. Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (02):160-.
    Marx believed that what most clearly distinguished him and Engels from the nineteenth-century French socialists was that their version of socialism was “scientific” while the latters' was Utopian. What he intended by this contrast is roughly the following: French socialists such as Proudhon and Fourier constructed elaborate visions of a future socialist society without an adequate understanding of existing capitalist society. For Marx, on the other hand, socialism was not an idea or an ideal to be realized, but a natural (...)
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  17. N. Scott Arnold (1988). Reply to Professor Putterman. Economics and Philosophy 4 (02):337-.
  18. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Hume's Skepticism in the Treatise of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (3):450-452.
  19. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Reply to Professor Nell. Ethics 97 (2):411-413.
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  20. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Recent Work on Marx: A Critical Survey. American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (4):277 - 293.
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  21. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Why Profits Are Deserved. Ethics 97 (2):387-402.
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  22. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Final Reply to Professor Schweickart. Economics and Philosophy 3 (02):335-.
    Since Schweickart asserts that I have not addressed his main argument, let me consider briefly the four claims he advances at the beginning of his second reply. Regarding 1: To argue, as I have, that there would be a strong tendency for market socialism to degenerate into capitalism, it is necessary to spell out carefully what capitalism is . Following Marx, I defined capitalism as a system in which the workers do not control the means of production and the workers (...)
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  23. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Further Thoughts on the Degeneration of Market Socialism: A Reply to Schweickart. Economics and Philosophy 3 (02):320-.
    David Schweickart has challenged a number of claims that are central to my argument that market socialism would probably degenerate into something only nominally distinguishable from capitalism. Chief among these is the claim that competitive pressures would force the workers in a worker-controlled firm to create pay and authority differentials that would make such firms structurally homologous to capitalist firms. Schweickart challenges this on two fronts: He argues that there is no good reason to believe that market forces under market (...)
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  24. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Marx And Disequilibrium in Market Socialist Relations of Production. Economics and Philosophy 3 (01):23-.
    One feature of socialism that has been little discussed in the recent revival of interest in Marx is the basic form of economic organization that will characterize such a society. Marx's view, to be documented in what follows, is that socialism would not have a market economy. This prediction should be a matter of some embarrassment or consternation to twentieth-century socialists outside of the Soviet bloc who claim a Marxist heritage. Despite the fact that some socialist regimes in the first (...)
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  25. N. Scott Arnold (1985). Capitalists and the Ethics of Contribution. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):87 - 102.
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  26. N. Scott Arnold (1983). Hume's Skepticism About Inductive Inference. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (1):31-56.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Hume's Skepticism about Inductive Inference N. SCOTT ARNOLD IT HAS BEEN A COMMONPLACE among commentators on Hume's philosophy that he was a radical skeptic about inductive inference. In addition, he is alleged to have been the first philosopher to pose the so-called problem of induction. Until recently, however, Hume's argument in this connection has not been subject to very close scrutiny. As attention has become focused on this (...)
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