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N. Verbin [13]N. K. Verbin [3]Nehama Verbin [1]
  1. N. Verbin (2005). But is It True? Ars Disputandi 5.
  2.  3
    N. Verbin (2010). Forgiveness and Hatred. Ethical Perspectives 17 (4):603.
    Philosophical accounts of forgiveness ordinarily emphasize three components: i) the overcoming of hostile emotions toward the wrongdoer; ii) a change of heart toward the wrongdoer, which goes beyond the cessation of hostile emotions and involves the acquisition of a more positive attitude toward him or her; iii) a willingness to restore the relationship and proceed toward reconciliation. In this paper, I examine these three presumed components, endorsing the first but rejecting the second and the third as unnecessary features of forgiveness. (...)
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  3. N. Verbin (2011). Wittgenstein and Maimonides on God and the Limits of Language. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (2):323 - 345.
    The purpose of this paper is to bring together two thinkers that are concerned with the limits of what can be said, Wittgenstein and Maimonides, and to explore the sense of the good life and of the mystical to which their therapeutic linguistic work gives rise. I argue that despite the similarities, two different senses of the "mystical" are brought to light and two different "forms of life" are explicated and recommended. The paper has three parts. In the first part, (...)
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  4.  15
    N. K. Verbin (2002). Uncertainty and Religious Belief. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 51 (1):1-37.
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  5.  12
    N. K. Verbin (2000). Religious Beliefs and Aspect Seeing. Religious Studies 36 (1):1-23.
    This paper is concerned with the centrality of aspect seeing in Wittgenstein's philosophy, with some analogies between religious beliefs and aspect seeing, and with the implications of these analogies for the question of the justification of religious beliefs. If belief in God is neither a hypothesis nor a regular perceptual belief but rather a type of aspect seeing, then the kinds of proofs and justifications that are applicable to it would have to engage the non-believer in a manner that would (...)
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  6.  19
    N. Verbin (2013). Can God Forgive Our Trespasses? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):181-199.
    Believers regularly refer to God as “forgiving and merciful” when praying for divine forgiveness. If one is committed to divine immutability and impassability, as Maimonides is, one must deny that God is capable, in principle, of acting in a forgiving manner. If one rejects divine impassability, maintaining that God has a psychology, as Muffs does, one must reckon with biblical depictions of divine vengeance and rage. Such depictions suggest that while being capable, in principle, of acting in a forgiving way, (...)
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  7.  7
    Barry Allen, Bernard Faure, Jacob Raz, Glenn Alexander Magee, N. Verbin, Dalia Ofer, Elaine Pryce & Amy M. King (2010). Introduction: Vanishing Into Things. Common Knowledge 16 (3):417-423.
    Introducing the sixth and final installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” Allen looks at the symposium retrospectively and concludes that it has mainly concerned “sage knowledge,” defined as foresight into the development of situations. The sagacious knower sees the disposition of things in an early, incipient form and knows how to intervene with nearly effortless and undetectable (quiet) effectiveness. Whatever the circumstance, the sage handles it with finesse, never doing too much but also never leaving anything undone (...)
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  8.  5
    N. Verbin (2014). Self‐Deception and the Life of Faith. Heythrop Journal 55 (5):845-859.
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  9.  9
    N. K. Verbin (2001). Can Faith Be Justified? Faith and Philosophy 18 (4):501-522.
    In this paper, I argue for a new conception of religious justifications which takes the performance of miracles as the paradigm of reasoning in religion. The paper has two parts: In the first part, I argue against Swinburne’s parity argument for the existence of God by showing that religious perceptions fit more comfortably among aspect perceptions, e.g., the perceptions of beauty and courage, than among our perceptions of objects and colors. In the second part of the paper I employ the (...)
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  10.  3
    N. Verbin (2010). The Ladder and the Cage Wittgenstein, Qoheleth, and Quietism. Common Knowledge 16 (3):474-492.
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article compares the worldview of Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes) and the quietism that it presumably entails to the early Wittgenstein's worldview and his quietism. The first section of the article treats a relevant paradox in the worldview of the early Wittgenstein: his positive exhortations for certain types of speech and silence, for certain types of action and inaction, seem in conflict with his statement that, in the world, (...)
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  11.  5
    N. Verbin (2012). Martyrdom: A Philosophical Perspective. Philosophical Investigations 35 (1):68-87.
    Martyrdom has played and continues to play a dominant role in the religious imagination of many. Jews and Christians alike conceive of their martyrs as exceptional people of faith who express exceptional love and devotion to God. The purpose of this paper is to explore some of the conceptual features of martyrdom by virtue of which it has its role and to show, using those very features and using Simone Weil's observations, that martyrdom cannot mark the logical climax of the (...)
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  12.  2
    N. Verbin (2005). The Mystique of Moral Dilemmas. Ratio 18 (2):221–236.
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  13.  1
    N. Verbin (2011). Divinely Abused: A Philosophical Perspective on Job and His Kin. Continuum.
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  14. N. Verbin (2003). Realism and Christian Faith: God, Grammar, and Meaning, by Andrew Moore. [REVIEW] Ars Disputandi 3.
     
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  15. N. Verbin (2005). Rationality and Religious Theism, by Joshua L. Golding. [REVIEW] Ars Disputandi 5.
     
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  16. N. Verbin (2007). Wittgenstein and Judaism: A Triumph of Concealment, by Ranjit Chatterjee. [REVIEW] Ars Disputandi 7.
     
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