Search results for 'Name' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  11
    Thorn-R. Kray (forthcoming). On Name-Dropping: The Mechanisms Behind a Notorious Practice in Social Science and the Humanities. Argumentation:1-19.
    The present essay discusses a notorious rhetoric means familiar to all scholars in the social sciences and humanities including philosophy: name-dropping. Defined as the excessive over-use of authoritative names, I argue that it is a pernicious practice leading to collective disorientation in spoken discourse. First, I discuss name-dropping in terms of informal logic as an ad verecundiam-type fallacy. Insofar this perspective proves to lack contextual sensitivity, name-dropping is portrayed in Goffman’s terms as a more general social practice. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  4
    Darius Sauliūnas (2011). Domain Name Disputes in Lithuanian Courts: Silent Steps Towards Fairness on the Net. Jurisprudence 18 (3):943-961.
    National <.lt> domain name disputes in Lithuania are the ones which courts must decide without having any specific legal regulation. In such cases courts shall apply analogy of law, customs and general principals of law. Last but not least, the courts must address international legal practice as regards the domain name disputes, i.e. take into account the famous ICANN Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy adopted in 1999 and mostly applied by the panels of WIPO Arbitration and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  2
    Laura Martínez Escudero (2012). Balancing Asymmetries in Domain Name Arbitration Practices. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (3):297-316.
    As an alternative dispute resolution procedure, Domain Name Arbitration addresses not only contentions regarding the ownership of web pages, but also infringements of the Intellectual Property law such as cyber squatting or Internet piracy. In this spirit, panelists of the World Intellectual Property Organization enact law in accordance with what the involved parties provide them as burden of proof. Following this line of thought, we can assume that one party may remain unrepresented when it is not able to accomplish (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  5
    Michael I. Posner, Stephen J. Boies, William H. Eichelman & Richard L. Taylor (1969). Retention of Visual and Name Codes of Single Letters. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (1p2):1.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   48 citations  
  5.  4
    Elizabeth F. Loftus & William Cole (1974). Retrieving Attribute and Name Information From Semantic Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (6):1116.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  3
    Robert L. Hudson & James B. Austin (1970). Effect of Context and Category Name on the Recall of Categorized Word Lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):43.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  97
    Erik Persson (2014). What’s in a Name? – Exploring the Definition of ‘Cultural Relict Plant’. In Anna Andréasson, Anna Jakobsson, Elisabeth Gräslund Berg, Jens Heimdahl, Inger Larsson & Erik Persson (eds.), Sources to the history of gardening. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences 289-299.
    When working with garden archaeology and garden archaeobotany, the plant material is of great importance. It is important to be able to identify which plants have grown in a particular garden and which have not, which of the plants you find in the garden today that are newly introduced or have established themselves on their own, and which plants that may be remnants of earlier cultivation. During the past two years, my colleagues and I have been involved in a project (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  20
    Mark Sainsbury (2015). The Same Name. Erkenntnis 80 (S2):195-214.
    When are two tokens of a name tokens of the same name? According to this paper, the answer is a matter of the historical connections between the tokens. For each name, there is a unique originating event, and subsequent tokens are tokens of that name only if they derive in an appropriate way from that originating event. The conditions for a token being a token of a given name are distinct from the conditions for preservation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  40
    Aidan Gray (2014). Name-Bearing, Reference, and Circularity. Philosophical Studies 171 (2):207-231.
    Proponents of the predicate view of names explain the reference of an occurrence of a name N by invoking the property of bearing N. They avoid the charge that this view involves a vicious circularity by claiming that bearing N is not itself to be understood in terms of the reference of actual or possible occurrences of N. I argue that this approach is fundamentally mistaken. The phenomenon of ‘reference transfer’ shows that an individual can come to bear a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10.  4
    J. P. Smit, A Note on Name Individuation and Identifying Descriptions.
    CITATION: Smith, J. P. 2014. A note on name individuation and identifying descriptions. Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics, 43:165-170, doi:10.5774/43-0-165.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  15
    Eric Anthony Beerbohm (2012). In Our Name: The Ethics of Democracy. Princeton University Press.
    Preface -- Introduction -- How to value democracy -- Paper stones, the ethics of participation -- Philosophers-citizens -- Superdeliberators -- What is it like to be a citizen? -- Democracy's ethics of belief -- The division of democratic labor -- Representing principles -- Democratic complicity -- Not in my name, macrodemocratic design.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  55
    Thomas Uebel (2013). “Logical Positivism”—“Logical Empiricism”: What's in a Name? Perspectives on Science 21 (1):58-99.
    Do the terms “logical positivism” and “logical empiricism” mark a philosophically real and significant distinction? There is, of course, no doubt that the first term designates the group of philosophers known as the Vienna Circle, headed by Moritz Schlick and including Rudolf Carnap, Herbert Feigl, Philipp Frank, Hans Hahn, Otto Neurath, Friedrich Waismann and others. What is debatable, however, is whether the name “logical positivism” correctly distinguishes their doctrines from related ones called “logical empiricism” that emerged from the Berlin (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  2
    William James (1978). Pragmatism a New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking. Duke University Press.
    One of the great American pragmatic philosophers alongside Peirce and Dewey, William James delivered these eight lectures in Boston and New York in the winter of 1906–7. Though he credits Peirce with coining the term 'pragmatism', James highlights in his subtitle that this 'new name' describes a philosophical temperament as old as Socrates. The pragmatic approach, he says, takes a middle way between rationalism's airy principles and empiricism's hard facts. James' pragmatism is both a method of interpreting ideas by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  14.  95
    Gregory McCulloch (1989). The Game of the Name: Introducing Logic, Language, and Mind. Oxford University Press.
    This introduction to modern work in analytic philosophy uses the example of the proper name to give a clear explanation of the logical theories of Gottlob Frege, and explain the application of his ideas to ordinary language. McCulloch then shows how meaning is rooted in the philosophy of mind and the question of intentionality, and looks at the ways in which thought can be "about" individual material objects.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  15.  52
    Mark D. Roberts (2005). Name Strategy: Its Existence and Implications. Int.J.Computational Cognition 3:1-14.
    It is argued that colour name strategy, object name strategy, and chunking strategy in memory are all aspects of the same general phenomena, called stereotyping, and this in turn is an example of a know-how representation. Such representations are argued to have their origin in a principle called the minimum duplication of resources. For most the subsequent discussions existence of colour name strategy suffices. It is pointed out that the BerlinA- KayA universal partial ordering of colours and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  47
    Richard Coates (2009). A Strictly Millian Approach to the Definition of the Proper Name. Mind and Language 24 (4):433-444.
    A strictly Millian approach to proper names is defended, i.e. one in which expressions when used properly ('onymically') refer directly, i.e. without the semantic intermediaryship of the words that appear to comprise them. The approach may appear self-evident for names which appear to have no component parts (in current English) but less so for others. Two modes of reference are distinguished for potentially ambiguous expressions such as The Long Island . A consequence of this distinction is to allow a speculative (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17. Hagit Borer (2005). Structuring Sense: Volume 1: In Name Only. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Structuring Sense explores the difference between words however defined and structures however constructed. It sets out to demonstrate over three volumes, of which this is the first, that the explanation of linguistic competence should be shifted from lexical entry to syntactic structure, from memory of words to manipulation of rules. Its reformulation of how grammar and lexicon interact has profound implications for linguistic, philosophical, and psychological theories about human mind and language. Hagit Borer departs from both language specific constructional approaches (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  45
    Vojtěch Kolman (2010). Continuum, Name and Paradox. Synthese 175 (3):351 - 367.
    The article deals with Cantor's argument for the non-denumerability of reals somewhat in the spirit of Lakatos' logic of mathematical discovery. At the outset Cantor's proof is compared with some other famous proofs such as Dedekind's recursion theorem, showing that rather than usual proofs they are resolutions to do things differently. Based on this I argue that there are "ontologically" safer ways of developing the diagonal argument into a full-fledged theory of continuum, concluding eventually that famous semantic paradoxes based on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  5
    Nel Grillaert (2012). What's in God's Name: Literary Forerunners and Philosophical Allies of the Imjaslavie Debate. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 64 (3-4):163-181.
    The aim of this paper is to explore the interaction between a tradition that belongs originally to the realm of orthodox contemplative monasticism (i.e., hesychasm) and nineteenth-and early twentieth-century Russian intellectuals. In the first part, this paper will explore how hesychasm gradually penetrated nineteenthcentury secular culture; a special focus will be on the hermitage of Optina Pustyn' and its renowned elders, as well as their appeal to members of the Optina-intelligentsia, especially Fëdor Dostoevskij. Then, attention will shift to the imjaslavie (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  30
    Feng Cao (2008). A Return to Intellectual History: A New Approach to Pre-Qin Discourse on Name. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (2):213-228.
    Discussions of name during the pre-Qin and Qin-Han period of Chinese history were very active. The concept ming at that time can be divided into two categories, one is the ethical-political meaning of the term and the other is the linguistic-logical understanding. The former far exceeds the latter in terms of overall influence on the development of Chinese intellectual history. But it is the latter that has received the most attention in the 20th century, due to the influence of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  1
    Paolo Gonthier, Ivan Visentin, Danila Valentino, Giacomo Tamietti & Francesca Cardinale (forthcoming). The Legitimate Name of a Fungal Plant Pathogen and the Ethics of Publication in the Era of Traceability. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-3.
    When more scientists describe independently the same species under different valid Latin names, a case of synonymy occurs. In such a case, the international nomenclature rules stipulate that the first name to appear on a peer-reviewed publication has priority over the others. Based on a recent episode involving priority determination between two competing names of the same fungal plant pathogen, this letter wishes to open a discussion on the ethics of scientific publications and points out the necessity of a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  29
    Aaron Ben-Ze'ev & Ruhama Goussinsky (2008). In the Name of Love: Romantic Ideology and its Victims. OUP Oxford.
    This book is about love - our ideals of love, our experiences of love, and the fatal consequences of love. A unique collaboration between a leading philosopher in the field of emotions and a social scientist, In The Name of Love presents fascinating insights into romantic love and its future in modern society.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23.  35
    Erik Doxtader (2013). In the Name of a Becoming Rhetoric: Critical Reflections on the Potential of Aristotle's Rhetoric 1355b. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (2):231-233.
    ἔστω δὴ ἡ ῥητορικὴ δύναμις περὶ ἕκαστον τοῦ θεωρῆσαι τὸ ἐνδεχόμενον πιθανόν.(Estō dē hē rhētorikē dunamis peri hekaston tou theōrēsai to endekhomenon pithanon.)Let us define rhetoric to be "A faculty of considering all the possible means of persuasion on every subject."Rhetoric then may be defined as the faculty of discovering the possible means of persuasion in reference to any subject whatever.Rhetoric may be defined as the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion.Let rhetoric be [defined (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  6
    Allan Bäck (2015). How the Fallacy of Accident Got Its Name. Vivarium 53 (2-4):142-169.
    _ Source: _Volume 53, Issue 2-4, pp 142 - 169 I offer an explanation of why the fallacy of “accident” is so called. By ‘accident’ here, Aristotle does not mean accidental predication but being _per accidens_. Understood in this way, the fallacy of accident can be analyzed in terms of the rules that Aristotle gives for being _per accidens_. The fallacy of accident lost the original justification for its name in the late Greek period. It became associated with accidental (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  70
    Jon Roffe (2007). The Errant Name: Badiou and Deleuze on Individuation, Causality and Infinite Modes in Spinoza. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 40 (4):389-406.
    Although Alain Badiou dedicates a number of texts to the philosophy of Benedict de Spinoza throughout his work—after all, the author of a systematic philosophy of being more geometrico must be a point of reference for the philosopher who claims that “mathematics = ontology”—the reading offered in Meditation Ten of his key work Being and Event presents the most significant moment of this engagement. Here, Badiou proposes a reading of Spinoza’s ontology that foregrounds a concept that is as central to, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  41
    Chien-Hsing Ho (2012). One Name, Infinite Meanings: Jizang's Thought on Meaning and Reference. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (3):436-452.
    Jizang sets forth a hermeneutical theory of “one name, infinite meanings” that proposes four types of interpretation of word meaning to the effect that a nominal word X means X, non-X, the negation of X, and all things whatsoever. In this article, I offer an analysis of the theory, with a view to elucidating Jizang's thought on meaning and reference and considering its contemporary significance. The theory, I argue, may best be viewed as an expedient means for telling us (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  2
    Kentaro Kikuchi (2008). Call-by-Name Reduction and Cut-Elimination in Classical Logic. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 153 (1):38-65.
    We present a version of Herbelin’s image-calculus in the call-by-name setting to study the precise correspondence between normalization and cut-elimination in classical logic. Our translation of λμ-terms into a set of terms in the calculus does not involve any administrative redexes, in particular η-expansion on μ-abstraction. The isomorphism preserves β,μ-reduction, which is simulated by a local-step cut-elimination procedure in the typed case, where the reduction system strictly follows the “ cut=redex” paradigm. We show that the underlying untyped calculus is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  34
    Thomas Sattig (1998). Proper Name Change. Theoria 13 (3):491-501.
    Gareth Evans adduces a case in which a proper name apparently undergoes a change in referent. ‘Madagascar’ was originally the name of a part of Africa. Marco Polo, erroneously thinking he was following native usage, applied the name to an island off the African coast. Today ‘Madagascar’ is the name of that island. Evans argues that this kind of case threatens Kripke ’s picture of naming as developed in Naming and Necessity. According to this picture, the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  21
    Daniele Mezzadri (2014). Nominalism and Realism. How Not to Read the Tractatus' Conception of a Name. Philosophical Investigations 37 (3):208-227.
    This paper focuses on a central aspect of the “picture theory” in the Tractatus – the “identity requirement” – namely the idea that a proposition represents elements in reality as combined in the same way as its elements are combined. After introducing the Tractatus' views on the nature of the proposition, I engage with a “nominalist” interpretation, according to which the Tractatus holds that relations are not named in propositions. I claim that the nominalist account can only be maintained by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  13
    Ülle Pärli & Eleonora Rudakovskaja (2002). Juri Lotman on Proper Name. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):577-590.
    The article treats the concept of proper name in Juri Lotman’s semiotics, taking into account also studies in the same field by other authors of the Tartu-Moscow school (V. Ivanov, B. Ogibenin, V. Toporov, B. Uspenski). Focus is laid at three sub-topics: name and myth, name and text, name and artistic creation. One of the sources of treating proper name for both the program article by J. Lotman and B. Uspenski (“Myth — Name (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  12
    Oliver Marchart (2007). In the Name of the People: Populist Reason and the Subject of the Political. Diacritics 35 (3):3-19.
    The article seeks to stress the importance of two main innovations in Ernesto Laclau's recent work: what his theory of populism in On Populist Reason provides in terms of theoretical innovations is , a political theory of naming, and , a political theory of the heterogeneous. Furthermore, it is asked what it means to name, as Laclau himself does, the subject of the political "the people" and to define populism as the logic of all politics. It is argued against (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  4
    Jennifer L. Biddle (2015). My Name is Danny. Angelaki 20 (3):105-113.
    This paper offers a close reading of PAW Media animation My Name is Danny. Drawing across a growing body of recent Central and Western Desert experimental cinema, this paper asks what is at stake in the turn to animation. Rather than escapism or otherworldly fabrications which have little to do with lived experience of the “real,” animation in this context has potent everyday exigencies and politics. The capacity for bringing to life literally – animate – is here linked to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  13
    Manne Sjöstrand, Stefan Eriksson, Niklas Juth & Gert Helgesson (2013). Paternalism in the Name of Autonomy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):jht049.
    Different ideas of the normative relevance of autonomy can give rise to profoundly different action-guiding principles in healthcare. If autonomy is seen as a value rather than as a right, it can be argued that patients’ decisions should sometimes be overruled in order to protect or promote their own autonomy. We refer to this as paternalism in the name of autonomy. In this paper, we discuss different elements of autonomy (decision-making capacity, efficiency, and authenticity) and arguments in favor of (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  9
    Ülle Pärli (2011). Proper Name as an Object of Semiotic Research. Sign Systems Studies 39 (2-4):197-222.
    The present article is divided into two parts. Its theoretical introductory part takes under scrutiny how proper name has been previously dealt with in linguistics, philosophy and semiotics. The purpose of this short overview is to synthesise different approaches that could be productive in the semiotic analysis of naming practices. Author proposes that proper names should not be seen as a linguistic element or a type of (indexical) signs, but rather as a function that can be carried by different (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  9
    Michael Naas (2003). For the Name's Sake. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):199-221.
    In Plato’s later dialogues, and particularly in the Sophist, there is a general reinterpretation and rehabilitation of the name (onoma) in philosophy. No longer understood rather vaguely as one of potentially dangerous and deceptive elements of everyday language or of poetic language, the word onoma is recast in the Sophist and related dialogues into one of the essential elements of a philosophical language that aims to make claims or propositions about the way thingsare. Onoma, now understood as name, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  4
    W. S. Allen (1948). Supplementary Note on the Name of the Black Sea. Classical Quarterly 42 (1-2):60-.
    Since my article in C.Q. xli, pp. 86 ff., a further discussion of the problem has come to my notice. H. Jacobsohn, in an article entitled Σκνθικ in Zeitschr. f. vergleichende Sprachforschung, liv, pp. 254 ff., anticipates my point that the Greek ᾊξενƿς is borrowed not from Avestan but from some other Iranian language, probably Scythian. He also makes outan attractive case, based on the word παφδεισ¿ς, for considering the Iranian pronunciation at the period when the loan occurred to have (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  4
    Jean Dunbabin (1993). What's in a Name? Philip, King of France. Speculum 68 (4):949-968.
    Among the high aristocrats of the Carolingian and post-Carolingian world, the naming of children was a serious business—so serious as to be almost immune to fashion and to personal taste. Before the twelfth-century demographic upswing, the number of children in each family who survived childhood and could be counted on to continue the tradition of their parents was small. Many illustrious lines, like that of Gerald of Aurillac or of William the Pious, duke of Aquitaine, died out rapidly; other families, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  26
    Don S. Levi (2008). What's in a Name? Philosophical Investigations 31 (4):340-358.
    This paper is about the mode of being of names. The paper begins by explaining why the joke is on commentators who see Lewis Carroll's White Knight as applying the use/mention distinction. Then it argues that the real problem with the distinction is that the idea that names are used to mention what they name depends on mistakenly conceiving of language as existing autonomously; and that philosophers have this conception because they fail to appreciate what they are doing when (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  7
    J. Gerald Janzen (1979). What's in a Name? “Yahweh” in Exodus 3 and the Wider Biblical Context. Interpretation 33 (3):227-239.
    In the third chapter of Exodus we are told what the name of God intrinsically means, in such a way that we are to understand the biblical history from the name, rather than the name from the biblical history.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  22
    Jeffrey B. Gold (1978). The Ambiguity of 'Name' in Plato's 'Cratylus'. Philosophical Studies 34 (3):223 - 251.
    In the "cratylus", Plato presents two theories about the correctness of names, I.E., Names are correct by nature and names are correct by convention. In this paper, I argue that plato holds both views because he recognizes that the word 'name' is ambiguous as between type and token. Name tokens (individual strings of marks and noises) are conventional for plato. But name types (the role played by the tokens or the concept expressed by the tokens) are not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  9
    Thomas Osborne & Nikolas Rose (1997). In the Name of Society, or Three Theses on the History of Social Thought. History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):87-104.
    Who is speaking in the history of social thought? The question of the authentic voice of social thought is typically posed in terms that tend to be either ambitiously theoretical or carefully methodological. Thus histories of social thought frequently offer either a résumé of general ideas about society or a survey which gets bogged down in a rather tedious, nit-picking debate about empirical methodology. This paper is something of a preview of a pro jected attempt on the part of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  17
    Jim Mcnally & Allan Blake (2012). Miss, What's My Name? New Teacher Identity as a Question of Reciprocal Ontological Security. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (2):196-211.
    This paper extends the dialogue of educational philosophy to the experience of beginners entering the teaching profession. Rather than impose the ideas of any specific philosopher or theorist, or indeed official standard, the exploration presented here owes its origins to phenomenology and the use of grounded theory. Working from a narrative data base and focussing on the knowing of name in the first instance, the authors develop their emergent ideas on self and identity in relation to children taught, through (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  1
    Erik Doxtader (2015). The Recognizability of Recognition: Fragments in the Name of a Not Yet Rhetorical Question. Philosophy and Rhetoric 48 (4):379-412.
    The absolute relation of name to knowledge-recognition [Erkenntnis] exists only in God; only there is name, because it is inwardly identical with the creative word, the pure medium of knowledge-recognition [Erkenntnis]. This means that God made things knowable-recognizable [erkennbar] in their names. Man, however, names them according to knowledge-recognition [Erkenntnis]. An act is—in connection with the perfected state of the world—not what happens now or “soon”: a demand cannot demand, or command anything now. They enter disjointedly, in symbolic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  5
    Szu-Hung Lin & Yei-Yu Yeh (2014). Attentional Load and the Consciousness of One’s Own Name. Consciousness and Cognition 26:197-203.
    We investigated how the location of one’s own name in a visual display influences its conscious awareness using recall and recognition tests in an inattentional blindness paradigm. The participant’s own name or another person’s name appeared unexpectedly in the center or the periphery of the display during a critical trial under low- or high-attentional search load. The results showed that the majority of participants detected their names under low load regardless of location and test method. Under high (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  15
    William R. Stirton (1994). A Problem Concerning the Definition of `Proper Name'. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (174):83-89.
    By "proper name" I mean a proper name in Frege's sense, i.e., a singular term. The "problem" mentioned in the title is whether the subject-term of an existential statement can be a proper name. I concentrate on examining some of the existing attempts to define "proper name" and conclude that, whatever answer is given to the question just posed, the authors of these attempts (Dummett, C Wright and B Hale) will have to modify some of their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  9
    A. C. Moorhouse (1948). The Name of the Euxine Pontus Again. Classical Quarterly 42 (1-2):59-.
    Etymology, especially that of an ancient language like Greek, is not as a rule a field in which one expects to get conclusive demonstration; and between rival explanations one is often provided with a choice which cannot be made with much confidence. But despite this I think that I should reply to the article by W. S. Allen on ‘The Name of the Black Sea in Greek’ , pp. 86–8), which has raised again the question dealt with in my (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  10
    Carl Anders Säfström (2010). The Immigrant has No Proper Name: The Disease of Consensual Democracy Within the Myth of Schooling. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5):606-617.
    In this article I discuss the role of the immigrant in Swedish society and especially how such a role is construed through what I call the myth of schooling, that is, the normalization of an arbitrary distribution of wealth and power. I relate this myth to the idea of consensual democracy as it is expressed through an implicit idea of what it means to be Swedish. I not only critique the processes through which immigrants are discriminated against or excluded from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  4
    Guido Vanackere (2003). Change in Individuals Without a Name. Contextual Indicators & the Free Change-Adaptive Logic. Logic and Logical Philosophy 11:213-230.
    Proof theory and semantics of an adaptive logic that deals adequately with change in individuals with or without a name are presented. New logical constants are introduced, viz. indicators. Within a given context they function as names, predicates and quantifiers at the same time. The thus extended language (of classical logic) has a big expressive power and solvespartly — the (classical) non-logical presuppositions with respect to ‘the existence of individuals’. Nevertheless, from a purely logical point of view, the here (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  3
    Vickie Sullivan (2006). Against the Despotism of a Republic: Montesquieu's Correction of Machiavelli in the Name of the Security of the Individual. History of Political Thought 27 (2):263-289.
    Montesquieu calls Machiavelli a 'great man' in his Spirit of the Laws, and commentators have demonstrated his knowledge of and indebtedness to the Florentine. Careful consideration of his treatment of Machiavelli in this work, however, suggests that Montesquieu has grave misgivings regarding Machiavelli's form of republicanism. Indeed, far from regarding Machiavelli's republicanism as an embodiment of liberty, the Frenchman suggests that it is actually despotic because it too readily sacrifices the security of the individual in the name of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  9
    Allan Blake (2012). Miss, What's My Name? New Teacher Identity as a Question of Reciprocal Ontological Security. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (2):196-211.
    This paper extends the dialogue of educational philosophy to the experience of beginners entering the teaching profession. Rather than impose the ideas of any specific philosopher or theorist, or indeed official standard, the exploration presented here owes its origins to phenomenology and the use of grounded theory. Working from a narrative data base and focussing on the knowing of name in the first instance, the authors develop their emergent ideas on self and identity in relation to children taught, through (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000