Search results for 'Names History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Wensheng Qu & Run Li (2015). Translation of Personal and Place Names From and Into Chinese in Modern China: A Lexicographical History Perspective. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 28 (3):525-557.
    This article mainly discusses the standardization of the translation of personal and place names. In the first section, common problems in the translations of foreign names and Chinese names are summarized. The basic principles of the translation of personal names are discussed and several systems used in the transliteration history of Chinese names are presented in detail. The author also makes a brief review and comments on bilingual dictionaries of personal names published in (...)
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  2.  8
    Klaus-Detlev Grothusen (1983). Conquerors and Indigenous Peoples. Geographical Loan Names and Their Importance in the History of South-East Europe in the First Millennium A. D. Philosophy and History 16 (2):184-185.
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  3.  3
    Anne McClintock & Rob Nixon (1986). No Names Apart: The Separation of Word and History in Derrida's "Le Dernier Mot du Racisme". Critical Inquiry 13 (1):140-154.
    As it stands, Derrida’s protest is deficient in any sense of how the discourses of South African racism have been at once historically constituted and politically constitutive. For to begin to investigate how the representation of racial difference has functioned in South Africa’s political and economic life, it is necessary to recognize and track the shifting character of these discourses. Derrida, however, blurs historical differences by conferring on the single term apartheid a spurious autonomy and agency: “The word concentrates separation…. (...)
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  4. C. Edmund Bosworth (2012). Notes on Some Turkish Personal Names in Seljūq Military History. Der Islam: Journal of the History and Culture of the Middle East 89 (1-2).
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  5.  4
    Bernard W. Henderson (1898). The Use of Place-Names in History. The Classical Review 12 (01):11-16.
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  6.  3
    J. S. C. Eidinow (2000). A FIGURE IN A LANDSCAPE R. Jenkyns: Virgil's Experience. Nature and History: Times, Names and Places . Pp. Xiii + 712. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998. Cased, £50. ISBN: 0-19-814033-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (02):440-.
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  7.  5
    J. D. F. Gilchrist (1900). History of the Local Names of Cape Fish. Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society 11 (1):207-232.
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  8.  3
    Mirna Velcic-Canivez (2012). Quelle Importance Ont les Noms D’Auteurs Dans le Discours Historique?The Importance of Authors Names in the Process of Writing History.The Knowledgeable, the Powerful and the Unknown. Cultura:157-178.
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  9.  7
    Andreas Willi (2008). Cows, Houses, Hooks: The Graeco-Semitic Letter Names as a Chapter in the History of the Alphabet. Classical Quarterly 58 (02):401-.
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  10.  2
    J. B. Bury (1895). The History of the Names Hellas, Hellenes. Journal of Hellenic Studies 15:217.
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  11. Josef Brožek (1977). Names in the History of Psychology: A Biographical SourcebookLeonard Zusne. Isis 68 (1):130-131.
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  12. Fredric L. Cheyette (1981). “P. H. Sawyer, Ed., Names, Words and Graves: Early Medieval Settlement. Lectures Delivered in the University of Leeds, May 1978. Leeds, Eng.: School of History, University of Leeds, 1979. Paper. Pp. Vii, 93. £3.50.Actes du Xème Congrès des Historiens Médiévistes de l'Enseignement Supérieur Public, Lille-Villeneuve d'Ascq, 18–19 Mai 1979: Le Paysage Rural. Réalités Et Représentations.” Villeneuve d'Ascq: Université des Sciences Humaines, Lettres Et Arts. Paper. Pp. 319.Landscape History 1 . Paper. Pp. 89; 28 Illustrations. May Be Ordered From the Editor, Dr. M. L. Faull, 3 Benjamin St., Wakefield, Eng. WF2 9AN.Lester J. Bilsky, Ed., Historical Ecology: Essays on Environment and Social Change. Port Washington, N.Y., and London: Kennikat Press, 1980. Pp. 195. $13.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 56 (3):677-678.
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  13. L. F. Ramsey (1927). Field-Names and Local History. New Blackfriars 8 (88):427-433.
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  14. Robert Woodhouse (2004). The Greek Prototypes of the City Names Sidon and Tyre: Evidence for Phonemically Distinct Initials in Proto-Semitic or for the History of Hebrew Vocalism? Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (2):237-248.
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  15.  5
    João P. Leal (2014). The Forgotten Names of Chemical Elements. Foundations of Science 19 (2):175-183.
    Chemical elements are the bricks with which Chemistry is build. Their names had a history, but part of it is forgotten or barely known. In this article the forgotten, no more used, never used, and alternatively used names and symbols of the elements are reviewed, bringing to us some surprises and deeper knowledge about the richness of Chemistry. It should be stressed that chemical elements are important not only for chemists but for all people dealing with science. (...)
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  16.  16
    Joeri Witteveen (forthcoming). Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History. Journal of the History of Biology.
    ‘Type’ in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93–119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. ‘Type’ was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber’s analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals an important dimension (...)
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  17.  9
    Scott A. Elias (2013). A Brief History of the Changing Occupations and Demographics of Coleopterists From the 18th Through the 20th Century. Journal of the History of Biology 47 (2):1-30.
    Systematic entomology flourished as a branch of Natural History from the 1750s to the end of the nineteenth century. During this interval, the “era of Heroic Entomology,” the majority of workers in the field were dedicated amateurs. This article traces the demographic and occupational shifts in entomology through this 150-year interval and into the early twentieth century. The survey is based on entomologists who studied beetles (Coleoptera), and who named sufficient numbers of species to have their own names (...)
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  18.  14
    Stéphane Mosès (2009). The Angel of History: Rosenzweig, Benjamin, Scholem. Stanford University Press.
    Franz Rosenzweig : the other side of the West -- Dissimilation -- Hegel taken literally -- Utopia and redemption -- Walter Benjamin : the three models of history -- Metaphors of origin : ideas, names, stars -- The esthetic model -- The angel of history -- Gershem Scholem : the secret history -- The paradoxes of messianism -- Kafka, Freud, and the crisis of tradition -- Language and secularization.
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  19. Robert Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) (2009). The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship between medical ethics (...)
     
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  20.  11
    Jens Soentgen (2010). On the History and Prehistory of CO 2. Foundations of Chemistry 12 (2):137-148.
    I will trace the little known prehistory and parts of the better known history of CO 2 by investigating some of the names it has been given from Antiquity to the present day. In Antiquity, the words pneuma or spiritus letalis designated both a supernatural force and an exhalation that emanated from certain caves. We will see how CO 2 gradually came to be regarded as something natural, a gas and then substance.
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  21. John Corcoran (2001). Second-Order Logic. In M. Zeleny (ed.), Logic, Meaning, and Computation: Essays in Memory of Alonzo Church. KLUKER 61–76.
    “Second-order Logic” in Anderson, C.A. and Zeleny, M., Eds. Logic, Meaning, and Computation: Essays in Memory of Alonzo Church. Dordrecht: Kluwer, 2001. Pp. 61–76. -/- Abstract. This expository article focuses on the fundamental differences between second- order logic and first-order logic. It is written entirely in ordinary English without logical symbols. It employs second-order propositions and second-order reasoning in a natural way to illustrate the fact that second-order logic is actually a familiar part of our traditional intuitive logical framework and (...)
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  22.  1
    Leo Catana (2016). On Dionysius the Areopagite. Volume 1: Mystical Theology and The Divine Names, Part I. Volume 2: The Divine Names, Part II by Marsilio Ficino. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (2):335-336.
    The volumes under review are of immense value, because they convey to the modern reader how and why one of the most important Renaissance Platonists, Marsilio Ficino, came to regard the writings of one late ancient Platonist, Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, as central to the history of ancient Platonism. The philosopher nowadays known as Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite is the author of four treatises composed in Greek in the late fifth or the sixth century CE: On the Divine Names, On (...)
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  23.  30
    Timothy M. S. Baxter (ed.) (1992). The Cratylus: Plato's Critique of Naming. E.J. Brill.
    This book aims to give a coherent interpretation of the whole dialogue, paying particular attention to these etymologies.The book discusses the rival theories ...
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  24.  2
    Mark Thurner (2009). The Founding Abyss of Colonial History: Or “the Origin and Principle of the Name of Peru”. History and Theory 48 (1):44-62.
    The name of “Peru” and the entities and beings it names first appeared “in an abyss of history” on “the edge of the world” in the early 1500s. In this essay I ask what hermeneutical truths or meanings the strange event that made the name of Peru both famous and historical holds for—and withholds from—any understanding of the meaning of colonial history. By way of a reading of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega’s rendering, in Los Comentarios Reales (...)
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  25. Plato (2011). Socrates and the Sophists: Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major and Cratylus. Focus Publishing/ R. Pullins Co..
    This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.
     
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  26. David Strauss (2002). Mapping and Naming the Moon: A History of Lunar Cartography and Nomenclature. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:283-284.
    It is understandable that Ewen Whitaker developed an interest in the history of mapping and naming the moon. As a participant in the Apollo missions and a member of the Task Group of Lunar Nomenclature of the International Astronomical Union, he was himself directly involved in conflicts between representatives of different countries over naming newly discovered lunar features. In an effort to understand the passions surrounding current controversies more completely, his book examines their origin and development from the seventeenth (...)
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  27. Linda Martín Alcoff (2005). Latino Vs. Hispanic: The Politics of Ethnic Names. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (4):395-407.
    The politics of ethnic names, such as ‘Latino’ and ‘Hispanic’, raises legitimate issues for three reasons: because non-political considerations of descriptive adequacy are insufficient to determine absolutely the question of names; political considerations may be germane to an ethnic name’s descriptive adequacy; and naming opens up the political question of a chosen furture, to which we are accountable. The history of colonial and neo-colonial conditions structuring the relations of the North, Central and South Americas is both critical (...)
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  28.  8
    Janusz Kuczyński (2007). Part I: 7–8/2007 New Stage of Religious and Secular Universalisms: The Complementarity of Secular and Sacred Emerged From Historical Dialectics and the Spirit of Dialogue — Towards Metanoia and the Meanings of History; Part II: 12/2007: II. The Long Birth and Formation of Humanistic Secularism and the Breakthrough to New Universalism—Through Complementary Acceptance of Secularity and Sacrality. [REVIEW] Dialogue and Universalism 17 (12):139-147.
    1. The birth of dialogue from the spirit of the Polish October political uprising: From social civil war and simple exclusions (even physical) to negotiations andcomplicated “Dialogue of Contradictions” within national entity. Almost 25 years before the much later birth and international triumph of the Solidarity Union, the “Polish October” of 1956, history’s first victorious anti-Stalinist political uprising and most certainly a historical milestone for Poland—if not all of Europe—was the main harbinger of change in all fundamental spheres of (...)
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  29.  28
    David Boersema (2007). Geach on Proper Names. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:37-42.
    Recently, several philosophers of language have claimed that, at least in some respects, Peter Geach proposed a view about proper names that anticipated important features of the causal theory (or historical chain theory) that was later set forth by Saul Kripke and others. Quentin Smith, for example, in his essay, "Direct, Rigid Designation and A Posteriori Necessity: A History and Critique," says explicitly that "Geach (1969) ... originated the causal or 'historical chain' theory of names" (1999). In (...)
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  30.  21
    Dmitri Nikulin (2008). Memory and History. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):75-90.
    This article traces some modern conceptions of memory in history (Halbwachs, Nora), indirectly comparing them with the ancient poetic tradition of so-called “catalogue poetry.” In the discussion of memory and oblivion, I argue that history encompasses multiple histories rather than constituting one single teleological and universal history. Every history is produced by a historical narrative that follows and interprets what may be called the historical proper, which comprises lists of names of people, things, or events (...)
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  31.  8
    Brianne Donaldson (2013). Bad with Names: Replacing “Animal” with Whitehead’s Insistent Particularity of Bodies. Process Studies 42 (2):181-199.
    In the history ofWestern thought the “animal” is a general idea devoid of the details ofparticularity. Whitehead poses a nuanced challenge to us: how to perceive each abstract “animal” as a concrete body. To become “bad with names” is an invitation to exchange reductionist designations with new language for individual creatures that populate the amorphous category of “animal.” Derrida, Deleuze, and Guattari, along with Whitehead, suggest ways in which we might understand the idea that there are no “animals,” (...)
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  32.  19
    Arnold Hauser (1958). The Philosophy of Art History. New York, Knopf.
    First published in 1959, this book is concerned with the methodology of art history, and so with questions about historical thinking; it enquires what scientific history of art can accomplish, what are its mean and limitations? It contains philosophical reflections on history and begins with chapters on the scope and limitations of a sociology of art, and the concept of ideology in the history of art. The chapter on the concept of "art history without (...)" occupies the central position in the book — thoroughly discussing the basic philosophical outlook for the whole work. There are also further chapters on psychoanalysis, folk art and popular art. The chapter on the role of convention in the history of art points the way for further study. (shrink)
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  33.  5
    S. Douglas Olson (1992). Names and Naming in Aristophanic Comedy. Classical Quarterly 42 (02):304-.
    One of the ironies of literary history is that the survival of Aristophanic comedy and indeed of all Greek drama is due to the more or less faithful transmission of a written text. Reading a play and watching one, after all, are very different sorts of activities. Unlike a book, in which the reader can leaf backward for reminders of what has already happened or forward for information about what is to come, a play onstage can be experienced in (...)
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  34.  19
    Arnold Hauser (2016). The Philosophy of Art History. Routledge.
    First published in 1959, this book is concerned with the methodology of art history, and so with questions about historical thinking; it enquires what scientific history of art can accomplish, what are its mean and limitations? It contains philosophical reflections on history and begins with chapters on the scope and limitations of a sociology of art, and the concept of ideology in the history of art. The chapter on the concept of "art history without (...)" occupies the central position in the book — thoroughly discussing the basic philosophical outlook for the whole work. There are also further chapters on psychoanalysis, folk art and popular art. The chapter on the role of convention in the history of art points the way for further study. (shrink)
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  35.  1
    Richard H. Popkin (ed.) (1999). The Columbia History of Western Philosophy. Cup.
    Richard Popkin has assembled 63 leading scholars to forge a highly approachable chronological account of the development of Western philosophical traditions. From Plato to Wittgenstein and from Aquinas to Heidegger, this volume provides lively, in-depth, and up-to-date historical analysis of all the key figures, schools, and movements of Western philosophy. The Columbia History significantly broadens the scope of Western philosophy to reveal the influence of Middle Eastern and Asian thought, the vital contributions of Jewish and Islamic philosophers, and the (...)
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  36.  1
    Richard H. Popkin (ed.) (2006). The Columbia History of Western Philosophy. Cup.
    Richard Popkin has assembled 63 leading scholars to forge a highly approachable chronological account of the development of Western philosophical traditions. From Plato to Wittgenstein and from Aquinas to Heidegger, this volume provides lively, in-depth, and up-to-date historical analysis of all the key figures, schools, and movements of Western philosophy. The Columbia History significantly broadens the scope of Western philosophy to reveal the influence of Middle Eastern and Asian thought, the vital contributions of Jewish and Islamic philosophers, and the (...)
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  37. B. L. Ullman (1915). Some Type-Names in the Odes of Horace. Classical Quarterly 9 (01):27-.
    In a recent number of the CLASSICAL QUARTERLY , under the title ‘Neaera as a Common Name,’ Mr. Postgate writes: ‘There are two undoubted instances of this use of Neaera in Prudentius which are cited by Mr. Ullman.’ This is indeed a very welcome admission, for, unless I am greatly mistaken, Mr. Postgate was formerly of the opinion that such a usage or anything approaching it was unthinkable in Latin.1 But Mr. Postgate still feels uneasy about it, for he says: (...)
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  38. John Corcoran (2006). Schemata: The Concept of Schema in the History of Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (2):219-240.
    The syllogistic figures and moods can be taken to be argument schemata as can the rules of the Stoic propositional logic. Sentence schemata have been used in axiomatizations of logic only since the landmark 1927 von Neumann paper [31]. Modern philosophers know the role of schemata in explications of the semantic conception of truth through Tarski’s 1933 Convention T [42]. Mathematical logicians recognize the role of schemata in first-order number theory where Peano’s second-order Induction Axiom is approximated by Herbrand’s Induction-Axiom (...)
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  39. Christian Schäfer (2006). Philosophy of Dionysius the Areopagite: An Introduction to the Structure and the Content of the Treatise on the Divine Names. Brill.
    This book proposes a reading of Dionysius the Areopagite's longest and most important treatise 'On the Divine Names' from a philosophical point of view, rather than from a theological point of view which dominates the secondary literature. At the same time, it can serve as an introduction to the entire philosophy of Dionysius.
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  40. Marzenna Cyzman (2009). Osobowe Nazwy Własne W Dziele Literackim Z Perspektywy Jego Ontologii. Wydawn. Nauk. Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
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  41. Gérard Petit (2009). La Dénomination: Approches Lexicologique Et Terminologique. Peeters.
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  42.  33
    Stephen P. Schwartz (2013). Mill and Kripke on Proper Names and Natural Kind Terms. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):925 - 945.
    Saul Kripke in his revolutionary and influential series of lectures from the early 1970s (later published as the book Naming and Necessity) famously resurrected John Stuart Mill's theory of proper names. Kripke at the same time rejected Mill's theory of general terms. According to Kripke, many natural kind terms do not fit Mill's account of general terms and are closer to proper names. Unfortunately, Kripke and his followers ignored key passages in Mill's A System of Logic in which (...)
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  43.  94
    Chen Bo (2011). Proper Names, Contingency A Priori and Necessity A Posteriori. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (2):119 - 138.
    After a brief review of the notions of necessity and a priority, this paper scrutinizes Kripke's arguments for supposedly contingent a priori propositions and necessary a posteriori propositions involving proper names, and reaches a negative conclusion, i.e. there are no such propositions, or at least the propositions Kripke gives as examples are not such propositions. All of us, including Kripke himself, still have to face the old question raised by Hume, i.e. how can we justify the necessity and universality (...)
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  44.  39
    Christine J. Thomas (2008). Inquiry Without Names in Plato's Cratylus. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 341-364.
    The interlocutors of Plato’s Cratylus agree that “it is far better to learn and to inquire from the things themselves than from their names”. Although surprisingly little attention has been paid to these remarks, at least some commentators view Plato as articulating a preference for direct, nonlinguistic cognitive access to the objects of inquiry. Another commentator takes Plato simply to recommend first-hand, yet linguistic, experience in addition to instruction from experts. This paper defends, in contrast to both interpretations, the (...)
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  45.  25
    Christopher Eagle (2009). Right Names. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):57-75.
    In the Cratylus, Soc rates discusses with Cratylus and Hermogenes the question of whether names are merely arbitrary or in some sense ‘right,’ that is, motivated by the nature of the things they designate. In this article, I examine Heidegger’s controversial project of unearthing archē Greek terms in the specific light of the Cratylus and the tradition of “Cratylisms” which it has fostered. Having demonstrated the underlying Cratylist tendencies behind Heidegger’s conviction in the inherent ‘appropriateness’ of many Greek keywords, (...)
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  46.  12
    M. Ereshefsky (2001). Names, Numbers and Indentations: A Guide to Post-Linnaean Taxonomy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (2):361-383.
    The vast majority of biological taxonomists use the Linnaean system when constructing classifications. Taxa are assigned Linnaean ranks and taxon names are devised according to the Linnaean rules of nomenclature. Unfortunately, the Linnaean system has become theoretically outdated. Moreover, its continued use causes a number of practical problems. This paper begins by sketching the ontological and practical problems facing the Linnaean system. Those problems are sufficiently pressing that alternative systems of classification should be investigated. A number of proposals for (...)
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  47. Saul A. Kripke (ed.) (2011). Philosophical Troubles. Collected Papers Vol I. Oxford University Press.
    This important new book is the first of a series of volumes collecting essential work by an influential philosopher. It presents a mixture of published and unpublished works from various stages of Kripke's storied career. Included here are seminal and much discussed pieces such as “Identity and Necessity,” “Outline of a Theory of Truth,” and “A Puzzle About Belief.” More recent published work include “Russell's Notion of Scope” and “Frege's Theory of Sense and Reference” among others. Several of the works (...)
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  48.  17
    Andrea Bianchi & Alessandro Bonanini (2014). Is There Room for Reference Borrowing in Donnellan’s Historical Explanation Theory? Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (3):175-203.
    Famously, both Saul Kripke and Keith Donnellan opposed description theories and insisted on the role of history in determining the reference of a proper name token. No wonder, then, that their views on proper names have often been assimilated. By focusing on reference borrowing—an alleged phenomenon that Kripke takes to be fundamental—we argue that they should not be. In particular, we claim that according to Donnellan a proper name token never borrows its reference from preceding tokens which it (...)
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  49.  9
    Diego Marconi (1990). Dictionaries and Proper Names. History of Philosophy Quarterly 7 (1):77 - 92.
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  50.  16
    Emily Hauptmann (2004). A Local History of "the Political". Political Theory 32 (1):34-60.
    This essay interprets changes in how "the political" was employed by a group of political theorists connected to the University of California, Berkeley, from the late 1950s up to the present. Initially, the political names both what students of politics ought to study and invokes a way of studying meant to have broad appeal. In later uses, however, the political takes on an evanescent quality compared to the solid realm of generality represented in earlier work. Also, only from the (...)
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