Search results for 'Naming' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anselm K. Min (2006). Naming the Unnameable God: Levinas, Derrida, and Marion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):99 - 116.score: 24.0
    In this essay I present the postmodern phenomenological approach of Levinas, Derrida, and Marion to the problem of naming the unnameable God. For Levinas, God is never experienced directly but only as a third person whose infinity is testified to in the infinity of responsibility to the hungry. For Derrida, God remains the unnameable "wholly other" accessible only as the indeterminate term of pure reference in prayer. For Marion, God remains the object of "de-nomination" through praise. In all three, (...)
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  2. Ludovic Ferrand, Marc Brysbaert, Emmanuel Keuleers, Boris New, Patrick Bonin, Alain Méot, Maria Augustinova & Christophe Pallier (2011). Comparing Word Processing Times in Naming, Lexical Decision, and Progressive Demasking: Evidence From Chronolex. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    We report performance measures for lexical decision, word naming, and progressive demasking for a large sample of monosyllabic, monomorphemic French words (N = 1,482). We compare the tasks and also examine the impact of word length, word frequency, initial phoneme, orthographic and phonological distance to neighbors, age-of-acquisition, and subjective frequency. Our results show that objective word frequency is by far the most important variable to predict reaction times in lexical decision. For word naming, it is the first phoneme. (...)
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  3. Gabriela Garrido Rodriguez Ardi Roelofs, Vitória Piai (2011). Attentional Inhibition in Bilingual Naming Performance: Evidence From Delta-Plot Analyses. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    It has been argued that inhibition is a mechanism of attentional control in bilingual language performance. Evidence suggests that effects of inhibition are largest in the tail of a response time (RT) distribution in non-linguistic and monolingual performance domains. We examined this for bilingual performance by conducting delta-plot analyses of naming RTs. Dutch-English bilingual speakers named pictures using English while trying to ignore superimposed neutral Xs or Dutch distractor words that were semantically related, unrelated, or translations. The mean RTs (...)
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  4. Alasdair Daniel Francis Clarke, Moreno I. Coco & Frank Keller (2013). The Impact of Attentional, Linguistic and Visual Features During Object Naming. Frontiers in Psychology 4:927.score: 24.0
    Object detection and identification are fundamental visual tasks and recent work suggests that it is primarily objects, rather than low-level salient regions, that attract our attention. This raises the question of which objects are important in the context of a visual scene. The current eye-tracking study investigates how different features (attentional, visual and linguistic) influence the likelihood that a given object in a scene will be named. We carried out an object naming task involving 24 participants and 100 photographic (...)
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  5. Bradford Z. Mahon Eduardo Navarrete, Paul Del Prato (2012). Factors Determining Semantic Facilitation and Interference in the Cyclic Naming Paradigm. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    The cyclic naming paradigm, in which participants are slower to name pictures blocked by semantic category than pictures in an unrelated context, offers a window into the dynamics of the mapping between lexical concepts and words. Here we provide evidence for the view that incremental learning effects on the connection weights from semantics to lexical items provide an elegant explanation of a range of observations within the cyclic naming paradigm. Our principal experimental manipulation is to vary the within-category (...)
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  6. Layla Gould, Jacqueline Cummine & Ron Borowsky (2012). The Cognitive Chronometric Architecture of Reading Aloud: Semantic and Lexical Effects on Naming Onset and Duration. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    We examined onset reaction time (RT) in a word naming task using an additive factors method. The pattern of additive and overadditive joint effects on RT among Instructions (INST: name all, name words), Word Frequency (WF: log10HAL), Semantic Neighbourhood Density (SND: Inverse Ncount), and Word Type (WT: regular, exception) supported a cognitive chronometric architecture consisting of at least two cascaded stages of processing, with the orthographic lexical system as the locus of the INST x WF and the INST x (...)
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  7. Ron Borowsky Layla Gould, Jacqueline Cummine (2012). The Cognitive Chronometric Architecture of Reading Aloud: Semantic and Lexical Effects on Naming Onset and Duration. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    We examined onset reaction time (RT) in a word naming task using an additive factors method. The pattern of additive and overadditive joint effects on RT among Instructions (INST: name all, name words), Word Frequency (WF: log10HAL), Semantic Neighbourhood Density (SND: Inverse Ncount), and Word Type (WT: regular, exception) supported a cognitive chronometric architecture consisting of at least two cascaded stages of processing, with the orthographic lexical system as the locus of the INST x WF and the INST x (...)
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  8. Rasha Abdel Rahman Sabrina Aristei, Pienie Zwitserlood (2012). Picture-Induced Semantic Interference Reflects Lexical Competition During Object Naming. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    With a picture-picture experiment we contrasted competitive and non-competitive models of lexical selection during language production. Participants produced novel noun-noun compounds in response to two separately displayed categorically related or unrelated objects (e.g. depicted objects: apple and cherry; naming response: "apple-cherry"). We observed a classic interference effect, with slower naming for related relative to unrelated pairs. This finding suggests that previous failures to find strong interference induced by context pictures may be due to the weakness of picture-induced lexical (...)
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  9. Heidi Savage, Naming and Referring.score: 22.0
    In this book, I survey three different puzzles with respect to proper names, two of which are historically well-known, another of which is more contemporary, and perhaps more controversial. I argue that accounting for these puzzles requires a semantic account of proper names alternative to those already offered. I propose and develop my own view of proper names, and devoting a full chapter to each of the three puzzles, demonstrate its explanatory power by showing how it elegantly solves each puzzle. (...)
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  10. J. Van Brakel (1982). Conventions In Naming. Philosophy Research Archives 8:243-277.score: 22.0
    Conventions in the use of names are discussed, particularly names of linguistic expressions. Also the reference of measure terms like ‘kg’ is discussed, and it is found analogous in important respects to expression names. Some new light is shed on the token-type distinction. Applications to versions of the liar paradox are shown. The use of quotation marks is critically examined.
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  11. David Lewis (1997). Naming the Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (3):325-42.score: 21.0
  12. A. P. Hazen (1999). On Naming the Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (2):224-231.score: 21.0
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  13. Ian Gold (1999). On Lewis on Naming the Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):365-370.score: 21.0
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  14. Vincent Blok (2012). Naming Being – or the Philosophical Content of Heidegger’s National Socialism. Heidegger Studies 28:101-122.score: 21.0
    This contribution discusses the philosophical meaning of the Martin Heidegger’s Rectoral address. First of all, Heidegger’s philosophical basic experience is sketched as the background of his Rectoral address; the being-historical concept of “Anfang”. Then, the philosophical question of the Rectoral address is discussed. It is shown, that Die Selbstbehauptung der deutschen Universität is asking for the identity of human being there (Dasein) in connection with the question about dem Eigenen (the Germans) and dem Fremden (the Greeks). This opposition structuralizes the (...)
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  15. William F. Dukes & William Bevan (1967). Stimulus Variation and Repetition in the Acquisition of Naming Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (2, Pt.1):178-181.score: 21.0
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  16. R. F. Berdie (1940). Effect of Benzedrine Sulphate on Blocking in Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (3):325.score: 21.0
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  17. William Z. Davidson, T. G. Andrews & Sherman Ross (1956). Effects of Stress and Anxiety on Continuous High-Speed Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (1):13.score: 21.0
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  18. Leslie A. Fox, Ronald E. Shor & Robert J. Steinman (1971). Semantic Gradients and Interference in Naming Color, Spatial Direction, and Numerosity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):59.score: 21.0
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  19. Charles R. Snyder (1972). Selection, Inspection, and Naming in Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):428.score: 21.0
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  20. James D. Windes (1968). Reaction Time for Numerical Coding and Naming of Numerals. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):318.score: 21.0
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  21. Mackenzie C. Cervenka, Dana F. Boatman-Reich, Julianna Ward, Piotr J. Franaszczuk & Nathan E. Crone (2011). Language Mapping in Multilingual Patients: Electrocorticography and Cortical Stimulation During Naming. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:13.score: 21.0
  22. Kim Kirsner & Fergus I. Craik (1971). Naming and Decision Processes in Short-Term Recognition Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (2):149.score: 21.0
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  23. Harvey M. Lacey (1961). Mediating Verbal Responses and Stimulus Similarity as Factors in Conceptual Naming by School Age Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (2):113.score: 21.0
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  24. Eugene A. Lovelace & William A. Spence (1972). Reaction Times for Naming Successive Letters of the Alphabet. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (2):231.score: 21.0
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  25. Robert E. Morin, Andrew Konick & Sandra McPherson (1965). Information and Reaction Time for "Naming" Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (3):309.score: 21.0
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  26. Laurence J. Severance & Frederick N. Dyer (1973). Failure of Subliminal Word Presentations to Generate Interference to Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):186.score: 21.0
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  27. Nancy S. Anderson & J. Alfred Leonard (1958). The Recognition, Naming, and Reconstruction of Visual Figures as a Function of Contour Redundancy. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (3):262.score: 21.0
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  28. Stuart Dimond & Graham Beaumont (1972). Hemisphere Function and Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):87.score: 21.0
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  29. Frederick N. Dyer (1973). Interference and Facilitation for Color Naming with Separate Bilateral Presentations of the Word and Color. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (3):314-317.score: 21.0
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  30. Kim Kirsner (1972). Naming Latency Facilitation: An Analysis of the Encoding Component in Recognition Reaction Time. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):171.score: 21.0
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  31. Tony Marcel & Bert Forrin (1974). Naming Latency and the Repetition of Stimulus Categories. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):450.score: 21.0
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  32. Chotiga Pattamadilok (2011). Naming in Noise: The Contribution of Orthographic Knowledge to Speech Repetition. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 21.0
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  33. Richard L. Taylor & Stephen Reilly (1970). Naming and Other Methods of Decoding Visual Information. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (1p1):80.score: 21.0
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  34. Leon Horsten (2005). Canonical Naming Systems. Minds and Machines 15 (2):229-257.score: 20.0
    This paper outlines a framework for the abstract investigation of the concept of canonicity of names and of naming systems. Degrees of canonicity of names and of naming systems are distinguished. The structure of the degrees is investigated, and a notion of relative canonicity is defined. The notions of canonicity are formally expressed within a Carnapian system of second-order modal logic.
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  35. Andrew Boucher, Comments on Naming and Necessity.score: 18.0
    I recently had the occasion to reread Naming and Necessity by Saul Kripke. NaN struck me this time, as it always has, as breathtakingly clear and lucid. It also struck me this time, as it always has, as wrong-headed in several major ways, both in its methodology and its content. Herein is a brief explanation why.
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  36. Achille C. Varzi (2012). The Naming of Facts. Analysis 72 (2):322-323.score: 18.0
    The naming of facts is a difficult matter / it isn’t just one of your holiday games..." A versification of a disturbing philosophical tribulation, after T. S. Eliot’s ‘The Naming of Cats’.
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  37. Osamu Kiritani (2013). Naming and Necessity From a Functional Point of View. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):93-98.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to develop a new connection between naming and necessity. I argue that Kripke’s historical account of naming presupposes the functional necessity of naming. My argument appeals to the etiological notion of function, which can be thought to capture the necessity of functionality in historical terms. It is shown that the historical account of naming entails all conditions in an etiological definition of function.
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  38. Stephen Palmquist (1987). A Priori Knowledge in Perspective: Naming, Necessity and the Analytic a Posteriori. Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):255 - 282.score: 18.0
    This is the second in a two part series of articles that attempt to clarify the nature and enduring relevance of Kant's concept of a priori knowledge. (For Part I, see below.) In this article I focus mainly on Saul Kripke's critique of Kant, in Naming and Necessity. I argue that Kripke draws attention to a genuine defect in Kant's epistemological framework, but that he used definitions of certain key terms that were quite different from Kant's definitions. When Kripke's (...)
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  39. Zsófia Zvolenszky (2007). Naming with Necessity (Part of the Dissertation Portfolio Modality, Names and Descriptions). Dissertation, New York Universityscore: 18.0
    In “Naming with Necessity”, it is argued that Kripke’s thesis that proper names are rigid designators is best seen as being motivated by an individual-driven picture of modality, which has two parts. First, inherent in proper-name usage is the expectation that names refer to modally robust individuals: individuals that can sustain modal predications like ‘is necessarily human’. Second, these modally robust individuals are the fundamental building blocks on the basis of which possible worlds should be conceived in a modal (...)
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  40. R. J. Nelson (1992). Naming and Reference: The Link of Word to Object. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The problem of reference is central to the fields of linguistics, cognitive science, and epistemology yet it remains largely unresolved. Naming and Reference explains the reference of lexical terms, with particular emphasis placed on proper names, demonstrative pronouns and personal pronouns. It examines such specific issues as: how to account for the reference of names that are empty or speculative, which abound in science and philosophy, and how to account for intentional reference as in "he took Mary to be (...)
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  41. Josep Macià (1998). Does Naming and Necessity Refute Descriptivism? Theoria 13 (3):445-476.score: 18.0
    In Naming and Necessity Saul Kripke offers a number of arguments in order to show that no descriptivist theory of proper names is correct. We present here a certain version of descriptivist theory -we will characterize it as an individual-use reference-fixing descriptivist theory that appeals to descriptions regarding how a name is used by other speakers. This kind of theory can successfully answer all the objections Kripke puts forward in Naming and Necessity. Such sort of descriptivist theory is (...)
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  42. Jaroslav Peregrin, Scott Soames, Beyond Rigidity, The Unfinished Semantic Agenda of Naming and Necessity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002, Ix + 379 Pp. [REVIEW]score: 18.0
    Saul Kripke ’s book Naming and Necessity (which first appeared in 1972 as a paper within a volume on natural language semantics1) is felt, by many linguists and philosophers, as a milestone of the semantic analysis of natural language. Prior to it, many semanticists took for granted that the meaning of any expression must be a two-level matter, consisting of something of the kind of what Frege called Sinn and Bedeutung or what Carnap christened as intension and extension. The (...)
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  43. Joeri Witteveen (forthcoming). Naming and Contingency: The Type Method of Biological Taxonomy. Biology and Philosophy:1-18.score: 18.0
    Biological taxonomists rely on the so-called ‘type method’ to regulate taxonomic nomenclature. For each newfound taxon, they lay down a ‘type specimen’ that carries with it the name of the taxon it belongs to. Even if a taxon’s circumscription is unknown and/or subject to change, it remains a necessary truth that the taxon’s type specimen falls within its boundaries. Philosophers have noted some time ago that this naming practice is in line with the causal theory of reference and its (...)
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  44. Michael Rinn (2006). Naming the Body of Nobody. Sign Systems Studies 34 (2):455-468.score: 18.0
    Victor Klemperer, German philologist and Professor at the University of Dresden, bears testimony to his survival during the Nazi years in his Diaries (1933–1945). Progressively excluded from all social life because of his Jewish religion, Klemperer is forced to recognize himself as a non-subject by the end of the war, calling himself “Nobody” in reference to Ulysses with Polyphemus, the Cyclops. Our article aims to show the mental — cognitive and corporal — process underlying this recognition. Our study will explore (...)
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  45. Kenneth A. Taylor, The Syntax and Pragmatics of The Naming Relation.score: 18.0
    Philosophers of language have lavished attention on names and other singular referring expressions. But they have focused primarily on what might be called lexicalsemantic character of names and have largely ignored both what I call the lexicalsyntactic character of names and also what I call the pragmatic significance of the naming relation. Partly as a consequence, explanatory burdens have mistakenly been heaped upon semantics that properly belong elsewhere. This essay takes some steps toward correcting these twin lacunae. When we (...)
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  46. R. G. Kuehni & C. L. Hardin (forthcoming). Color Matching and Color Naming: A Response to Roberts and Schmidtke. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-7.score: 18.0
    In their article ‘In defense of incompatibility, objectivism, and veridicality about color’ P. Roberts and K. Schmidtke offer the results of an experiment supposed to show that if selection of colored samples representing unique hues for subjects (naming) has a greater inter-subject variability than identification of sample pairs with no perceptual difference between them (matching) the result provides support for the philosophical concept of color realism. On examining the results in detail, we find that, according to standard statistical methodology, (...)
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  47. Niko Strobach (1998). Time and Development in Kripke's “Naming and Necessity”. Theoria 13 (3):503-517.score: 18.0
    In this article, I want to focus on time and development in Kripke’s “Naming and Necessity” by considering two topics: (1) the evolution of scientific knowledge; (2) the evolution of biographies. In connection with (1) I suggest the introduction of a sentence operator for epistemic possibility and argue that some of Kripke’s strong metaphysical statements are finely counterbalanced by rather “Popperian” epistemological considerations. In connection with (2) I consider the idea of exploiting necessity of origin for a crossworld identity (...)
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  48. Don Dedrick (1998). The Foundations of the Universalist Tradition in Color-Naming Research (and Their Supposed Refutation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 28 (2):179-204.score: 18.0
    In Basic Color Terms, Berlin and Kay argued for a restricted number of "basic" color words—words they claimed to be culturally universal. This claim about language was buttressed by psychologist Eleanor Rosch's famous work on color prototypes. Together, the works of Berlin and Kay and Rosch are the foundation for a contemporary research tradition investigating the biological foundations of color naming. In this article, the author describes some common objections to the works of Berlin and Kay and Rosch and (...)
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  49. Carine Defoort (1998). The Rhetorical Power of Naming: The Case of Regicide. Asian Philosophy 8 (2):111 – 118.score: 18.0
    The traditional reading of ancient Chinese texts focuses on their content rather than their modes of expression: truth is considered a given, of which language is merely the expression. This approach misses out on a predominant way of arguing in Chinese texts, namely to evaluate the situation by (re) naming it. A discussion of four textual fragments (up to the 2nd century BC) concerning the topic of regicide illustrates different degrees of this type of argumentation. Among philosophers discussion occurs (...)
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  50. Elizabeth Karger (1998). Richard Rufus on Naming Substances. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 7 (01):51-67.score: 18.0
    Some names, specifically the proper names by which people are called, are considered by at least one prominent contemporary philosopher. 1 Looking at the matter from the perspective of medieval philosophy, we might say that the reason such names are semantically ill-behaved is that the act of naming from which they derive is not one of adequate naming. Moreover, supposing that all manner of beings, including people, are we might let adequate naming be governed by the following (...)
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