Search results for 'Naming' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Eldar Sarajlic (2016). The Ethics and Politics of Child Naming. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (3).
    This article examines the issue of justification of government's intervention in the parental acts of child naming, a neglected topic in the recent philosophical literature. It questions the ability of some of the current theories in family ethics to respond to this problem, and argues that both permissive and restrictive theories fail to provide a plausible argument about the proper limits of government regulation of child naming practices. The article outlines an alternative solution that focuses on the child's (...)
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  2.  74
    Anselm K. Min (2006). Naming the Unnameable God: Levinas, Derrida, and Marion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):99 - 116.
    In this essay I present the postmodern phenomenological approach of Levinas, Derrida, and Marion to the problem of naming the unnameable God. For Levinas, God is never experienced directly but only as a third person whose infinity is testified to in the infinity of responsibility to the hungry. For Derrida, God remains the unnameable "wholly other" accessible only as the indeterminate term of pure reference in prayer. For Marion, God remains the object of "de-nomination" through praise. In all three, (...)
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  3. Saul Kripke (2010). Naming and Necessity. In Darragh Byrne & Max Kölbel (eds.), Philosophy. Routledge 431-433.
    _Naming and Necessity_ has had a great and increasing influence. It redirected philosophical attention to neglected questions of natural and metaphysical necessity and to the connections between these and theories of naming, and of identity. This seminal work, to which today's thriving essentialist metaphysics largely owes its impetus, is here reissued in a newly corrected form with a new preface by the author. If there is such a thing as essential reading in metaphysics, or in philosophy of language, this (...)
     
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  4. David Lewis (1997). Naming the Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (3):325-42.
  5.  1
    Kim Kirsner (1972). Naming Latency Facilitation: An Analysis of the Encoding Component in Recognition Reaction Time. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):171.
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  6.  6
    Laurence J. Severance & Frederick N. Dyer (1973). Failure of Subliminal Word Presentations to Generate Interference to Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):186.
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  7.  4
    Charles R. Snyder (1972). Selection, Inspection, and Naming in Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):428.
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  8.  4
    Louise Goueffic, Patriarchy's Language; Naming Our Species.
    Paper 1 The argument is made that the names made to be used by our species as its identity fall short of being a theory. Up to the present it was assumed that the names were based on a theory. No one questioned this situation before.
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  9.  46
    A. P. Hazen (1999). On Naming the Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (2):224-231.
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  10.  46
    Ian Gold (1999). On Lewis on Naming the Colours. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):365-370.
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  11.  11
    James D. Windes (1968). Reaction Time for Numerical Coding and Naming of Numerals. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):318.
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  12.  19
    Vincent Blok (2012). Naming Being – or the Philosophical Content of Heidegger’s National Socialism. Heidegger Studies 28:101-122.
    This contribution discusses the philosophical meaning of the Martin Heidegger’s Rectoral address. First of all, Heidegger’s philosophical basic experience is sketched as the background of his Rectoral address; the being-historical concept of “Anfang”. Then, the philosophical question of the Rectoral address is discussed. It is shown, that Die Selbstbehauptung der deutschen Universität is asking for the identity of human being there (Dasein) in connection with the question about dem Eigenen (the Germans) and dem Fremden (the Greeks). This opposition structuralizes the (...)
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  13.  5
    Leslie A. Fox, Ronald E. Shor & Robert J. Steinman (1971). Semantic Gradients and Interference in Naming Color, Spatial Direction, and Numerosity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):59.
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  14.  4
    Frederick N. Dyer (1973). Interference and Facilitation for Color Naming with Separate Bilateral Presentations of the Word and Color. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (3):314-317.
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  15.  13
    J. Van Brakel (1982). Conventions In Naming. Philosophy Research Archives 8:243-277.
    Conventions in the use of names are discussed, particularly names of linguistic expressions. Also the reference of measure terms like ‘kg’ is discussed, and it is found analogous in important respects to expression names. Some new light is shed on the token-type distinction. Applications to versions of the liar paradox are shown. The use of quotation marks is critically examined.
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  16.  2
    Tony Marcel & Bert Forrin (1974). Naming Latency and the Repetition of Stimulus Categories. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (3):450.
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  17.  6
    William F. Dukes & William Bevan (1967). Stimulus Variation and Repetition in the Acquisition of Naming Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (2, Pt.1):178-181.
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  18.  2
    Kim Kirsner & Fergus I. Craik (1971). Naming and Decision Processes in Short-Term Recognition Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (2):149.
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  19.  3
    R. F. Berdie (1940). Effect of Benzedrine Sulphate on Blocking in Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (3):325.
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  20.  3
    William Z. Davidson, T. G. Andrews & Sherman Ross (1956). Effects of Stress and Anxiety on Continuous High-Speed Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (1):13.
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  21.  1
    Eugene A. Lovelace & William A. Spence (1972). Reaction Times for Naming Successive Letters of the Alphabet. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (2):231.
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  22.  1
    Robert E. Morin, Andrew Konick & Sandra McPherson (1965). Information and Reaction Time for "Naming" Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (3):309.
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  23.  1
    Nancy S. Anderson & J. Alfred Leonard (1958). The Recognition, Naming, and Reconstruction of Visual Figures as a Function of Contour Redundancy. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (3):262.
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  24.  1
    Harvey M. Lacey (1961). Mediating Verbal Responses and Stimulus Similarity as Factors in Conceptual Naming by School Age Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (2):113.
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  25. Stuart Dimond & Graham Beaumont (1972). Hemisphere Function and Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):87.
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  26.  74
    Heidi Savage, Naming and Referring.
    This book is about whether reference to an individual is the essential feature of a proper name -- a widely held view -- or whether referring to an individual is simply a contingent feature. Of course, once we properly distinguish name types from name tokens, the latter is easily proved. The name type spelled M-o-n-t-a-g-u-e may refer to the logician, but it might also refer to nothing, if used, let us say, in a work of fiction, or simply by practicing (...)
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  27. Richard L. Taylor & Stephen Reilly (1970). Naming and Other Methods of Decoding Visual Information. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (1p1):80.
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  28. Saul A. Kripke (1980). Naming and Necessity. Harvard University Press.
  29. Andrew Boucher, Comments on Naming and Necessity.
    I recently had the occasion to reread Naming and Necessity by Saul Kripke. NaN struck me this time, as it always has, as breathtakingly clear and lucid. It also struck me this time, as it always has, as wrong-headed in several major ways, both in its methodology and its content. Herein is a brief explanation why.
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  30. Bryan Pickel (2016). Naming, Saying, and Structure. Noûs 50 (2).
    It is commonplace for philosophers to distinguish mere truths from truths that perspicuously represent the world's structure. According to a popular view, the perspicuous truths are supposed to be metaphysically revelatory and to play an important role in the accounts of law-hood, confirmation, and linguistic interpretation. Yet, there is no consensus about how to characterize this distinction. I examine strategies developed by Lewis and by Sider in his Writing the Book of the World which purport to explain this distinction in (...)
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  31. Stephen Palmquist (1987). A Priori Knowledge in Perspective: Naming, Necessity and the Analytic a Posteriori. Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):255 - 282.
    This is the second in a two part series of articles that attempt to clarify the nature and enduring relevance of Kant's concept of a priori knowledge. (For Part I, see below.) In this article I focus mainly on Saul Kripke's critique of Kant, in Naming and Necessity. I argue that Kripke draws attention to a genuine defect in Kant's epistemological framework, but that he used definitions of certain key terms that were quite different from Kant's definitions. When Kripke's (...)
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  32.  92
    Joeri Witteveen (2015). Naming and Contingency: The Type Method of Biological Taxonomy. Biology and Philosophy 30 (4):569-586.
    Biological taxonomists rely on the so-called ‘type method’ to regulate taxonomic nomenclature. For each newfound taxon, they lay down a ‘type specimen’ that carries with it the name of the taxon it belongs to. Even if a taxon’s circumscription is unknown and/or subject to change, it remains a necessary truth that the taxon’s type specimen falls within its boundaries. Philosophers have noted some time ago that this naming practice is in line with the causal theory of reference and its (...)
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  33. Osamu Kiritani (2013). Naming and Necessity From a Functional Point of View. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):93-98.
    The aim of this paper is to develop a new connection between naming and necessity. I argue that Kripke’s historical account of naming presupposes the functional necessity of naming. My argument appeals to the etiological notion of function, which can be thought to capture the necessity of functionality in historical terms. It is shown that the historical account of naming entails all conditions in an etiological definition of function.
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  34.  4
    Josef Perner & Brian Leahy (2016). Mental Files in Development: Dual Naming, False Belief, Identity and Intensionality. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (2):491-508.
    We use mental files to present an analysis of children's developing understanding of identity in alternative naming tasks and belief. The core assumption is that younger children below the age of about 4 years create different files for an object depending on how the object is individuated. They can anchor them to the same object, hence think of the same object whether they think of it as a rabbit or as an animal. However, the claim is, they cannot yet (...)
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  35.  11
    Alexander Powell, Maureen A. O'Malley, Staffan Mueller-Wille, Jane Calvert & John Dupré (2007). Disciplinary Baptisms: A Comparison of the Naming Stories of Genetics, Molecular Biology, Genomics and Systems Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 29 (1):5-32.
    Understanding how scientific activities use naming stories to achieve disciplinary status is important not only for insight into the past, but for evaluating current claims that new disciplines are emerging. In order to gain a historical understanding of how new disciplines develop in relation to these baptismal narratives, we compare two recently formed disciplines, systems biology and genomics, with two earlier related life sciences, genetics and molecular biology. These four disciplines span the twentieth century, a period in which the (...)
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  36.  15
    Josef Perner & Brian Leahy (forthcoming). Mental Files in Development: Dual Naming, False Belief, Identity and Intensionality. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-18.
    We use mental files to present an analysis of children's developing understanding of identity in alternative naming tasks and belief. The core assumption is that younger children below the age of about 4 years create different files for an object depending on how the object is individuated . They can anchor them to the same object, hence think of the same object whether they think of it as a rabbit or as an animal. However, the claim is, they cannot (...)
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  37.  20
    Fritz W. de Wet (2015). Naming and Nurturing Reality From a Heart Renewed by Grace. Hts Theological Studies 71 (2):01-08.
    This contribution investigates the unbearable tension between the homiletical act of naming reality on the one hand, and neglecting this same reality on the other hand, thereby causing it to return to an ignored, unchallenged and degenerated state. The author focuses on tension fields that are generated when preachers embark on the activity of naming realities in their proximate contexts and how they position, withdraw or distance themselves in a certain way when problematic elements are opened up by (...)
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  38. Achille C. Varzi (2012). The Naming of Facts. Analysis 72 (2):322-323.
    The naming of facts is a difficult matter / it isn’t just one of your holiday games..." A versification of a disturbing philosophical tribulation, after T. S. Eliot’s ‘The Naming of Cats’.
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  39.  17
    R. G. Kuehni & C. L. Hardin (2015). Color Matching and Color Naming: A Response to Roberts and Schmidtke. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (2):199-205.
    In their article ‘In defense of incompatibility, objectivism, and veridicality about color’ P. Roberts and K. Schmidtke offer the results of an experiment supposed to show that if selection of colored samples representing unique hues for subjects has a greater inter-subject variability than identification of sample pairs with no perceptual difference between them the result provides support for the philosophical concept of color realism. On examining the results in detail, we find that, according to standard statistical methodology, the relative magnitude (...)
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  40.  2
    Fred Vultee (2010). Credibility as a Strategic Ritual: The Times , the Interrogator, and the Duty of Naming. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (1):3 – 18.
    This study examines the use of names in the construction of “credibility” as a journalistic duty. Using the framework set forth by Tuchman (1972) of objectivity as a “strategic ritual,” the study discusses the ethical justifications put forth by the New York Times for the process through which it decided to identify a CIA interrogator who had been involved in questioning 9/11 captives. The examination concludes that the facticity of naming should ultimately be uncoupled from the concept of credibility.
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  41.  43
    Haim Gaifman (2006). Naming and Diagonalization, From Cantor to Gödel to Kleene. Logic Journal of the IGPL 14 (5):709-728.
    We trace self-reference phenomena to the possibility of naming functions by names that belong to the domain over which the functions are defined. A naming system is a structure of the form ,{ }), where D is a non-empty set; for every a∈ D, which is a name of a k-ary function, {a}: Dk → D is the function named by a, and type is the type of a, which tells us if a is a name and, if (...)
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  42.  17
    Christian Schäfer (2008). The Anonymous Naming of Names. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (4):561-580.
    The key to understanding Dionysius is the methodical acceptance of the literary fiction involved in reading an author who tries to recreate the immediateness of the first encounter of pagan wisdom and Christian doctrine. Dionysius’s method consists of the presentation of a Platonic ontology by way of biblical theonyms. These theonyms express whatever we can grasp of God by His self-communication toward us, yet they ultimately cannot reveal Him as He is. It is rewarding to compare biblical theonym and author’s (...)
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  43.  24
    Leon Horsten (2005). Canonical Naming Systems. Minds and Machines 15 (2):229-257.
    This paper outlines a framework for the abstract investigation of the concept of canonicity of names and of naming systems. Degrees of canonicity of names and of naming systems are distinguished. The structure of the degrees is investigated, and a notion of relative canonicity is defined. The notions of canonicity are formally expressed within a Carnapian system of second-order modal logic.
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  44.  56
    Josep Macià (1998). Does Naming and Necessity Refute Descriptivism? Theoria 13 (3):445-476.
    In Naming and Necessity Saul Kripke offers a number of arguments in order to show that no descriptivist theory of proper names is correct. We present here a certain version of descriptivist theory -we will characterize it as an individual-use reference-fixing descriptivist theory that appeals to descriptions regarding how a name is used by other speakers. This kind of theory can successfully answer all the objections Kripke puts forward in Naming and Necessity. Such sort of descriptivist theory is (...)
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  45.  31
    Niko Strobach (1998). Time and Development in Kripke's “Naming and Necessity”. Theoria 13 (3):503-517.
    In this article, I want to focus on time and development in Kripke’s “Naming and Necessity” by considering two topics: (1) the evolution of scientific knowledge; (2) the evolution of biographies. In connection with (1) I suggest the introduction of a sentence operator for epistemic possibility and argue that some of Kripke’s strong metaphysical statements are finely counterbalanced by rather “Popperian” epistemological considerations. In connection with (2) I consider the idea of exploiting necessity of origin for a crossworld identity (...)
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  46. Martha I. Gibson (2004). From Naming to Saying: The Unity of the Proposition. Wiley-Blackwell.
    'From Naming to Saying 'explores the classic question of the unity of the proposition, combining an historical approach with contemporary causal theories to offer a unique and novel solution. Presents compelling and sophisticated answers to questions about how language represents the world. Defends a novel approach to the classical question about the unity of the proposition. Examines three key historical theories: Frege’s doctrine of concept and object, Russell’s analysis of the sentence, and Wittgenstein’s picture theory of meaning. Combines an (...)
     
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  47.  22
    Michael Rinn (2006). Naming the Body of Nobody. Sign Systems Studies 34 (2):455-468.
    Victor Klemperer, German philologist and Professor at the University of Dresden, bears testimony to his survival during the Nazi years in his Diaries (1933–1945). Progressively excluded from all social life because of his Jewish religion, Klemperer is forced to recognize himself as a non-subject by the end of the war, calling himself “Nobody” in reference to Ulysses with Polyphemus, the Cyclops. Our article aims to show the mental — cognitive and corporal — process underlying this recognition. Our study will explore (...)
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  48.  16
    Geoff Rayner-Canham & Zheng Zheng (2008). Naming Elements After Scientists: An Account of a Controversy. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 10 (1):13-18.
    Over the last two hundred years, there have been many occasions where the name of a newly-discovered element has provoked controversy and dissent but in modern times, the naming of elements after scientists has proved to be particularly contentious. Here we recount the threads of this story, predominantly through discourses in the popular scientific journals, the first major discussion on naming an element after a scientist ; the first definitive naming after a scientist ; and the first (...)
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  49.  31
    Kenneth A. Taylor, The Syntax and Pragmatics of The Naming Relation.
    Philosophers of language have lavished attention on names and other singular referring expressions. But they have focused primarily on what might be called lexicalsemantic character of names and have largely ignored both what I call the lexicalsyntactic character of names and also what I call the pragmatic significance of the naming relation. Partly as a consequence, explanatory burdens have mistakenly been heaped upon semantics that properly belong elsewhere. This essay takes some steps toward correcting these twin lacunae. When we (...)
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  50.  10
    John Sutton (2001). Don Dedrick, Naming the Rainbow: Colour Language, Colour Science, and Culture Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 21 (2):106-109.
    If the so-called 'science wars' are futile shouting-matches between extremists, some of the more bewildering skirmishes have been contested in the realm of colour science and culture. Ethnographers, postmodernists, and Wittgensteinians stress the specificity of local colour naming strategies, or the peculiarity of objects and emotions with which colours are associated, and may confess lingering attraction to Whorf's idea that cultures carve up an intrinsically unstructured colour space into quite arbitrary linguistic categories. Self-proclaimedly hard-headed biological and evolutionary psychologists, in (...)
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