Search results for 'Nancy D. Cartwright' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nancy Cartwright, Stephan Hartmann, Carl Hoefer & Luc Bovens (eds.) (2008). Nancy Cartwright's Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 600.0
    Nancy Cartwright is one of the most distinguished and influential contemporary philosophers of science. Despite the profound impact of her work, until now there has not been a systematic exposition of Cartwright's philosophy of science nor a collection of articles that contains in-depth discussions of the major themes of her philosophy. This book is devoted to a critical assessment of Cartwright's philosophy of science and contains contributions from Cartwright's champions and critics. Broken into three parts, (...)
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  2. Nancy Cartwright (2010). Reply to Steel and Pearl Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics , Nancy Cartwright. Cambridge University Press, 2008, X + 270 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):87-94.score: 480.0
  3. N. Cartwright (1995). An Interview with Nancy Cartwright. Cogito 9 (3):203-215.score: 390.0
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  4. Nancy D. Cartwright (1979). Do Token-Token Identity Theories Show Why We Don't Need Reductionism? Philosophical Studies 36 (July):85-90.score: 290.0
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  5. Nancy Cartwright (1999). The Dappled World: A Study of the Boundaries of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    It is often supposed that the spectacular successes of our modern mathematical sciences support a lofty vision of a world completely ordered by one single elegant theory. In this book Nancy Cartwright argues to the contrary. When we draw our image of the world from the way modern science works - as empiricism teaches us we should - we end up with a world where some features are precisely ordered, others are given to rough regularity and still others (...)
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  6. Nancy Cartwright (2007). Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    Hunting Causes and Using Them argues that causation is not one thing, as commonly assumed, but many. There is a huge variety of causal relations, each with different characterizing features, different methods for discovery and different uses to which it can be put. In this collection of new and previously published essays, Nancy Cartwright provides a critical survey of philosophical and economic literature on causality, with a special focus on the currently fashionable Bayes-nets and invariance methods – and (...)
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  7. Nancy Cartwright (ed.) (1996). Otto Neurath: Philosophy Between Science and Politics. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    An international team of four authors, led by distinguished philosopher of science, Nancy Cartwright, and leading scholar of the Vienna Circle, Thomas E. Uebel, have produced this lucid and elegant study of a much-neglected figure. The book, which depicts Neurath's science in the political, economic and intellectual milieu in which it was practised, is divided into three sections: Neurath's biographical background and the socio-political context of his economic ideas; the development of his theory of science; and his legacy (...)
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  8. Nancy Cartwright (2008). Reply to Christoph Schmidt-Petri. In Nancy Cartwright, Stephan Hartmann, Carl Hoefer & Luc Bovens (eds.), Nancy Cartwright's Philosophy of Science. Routledge. 303--304.score: 240.0
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  9. Nancy Cartwright (2008). Reply to Daniela Bailer-Jones. In Nancy Cartwright, Stephan Hartmann, Carl Hoefer & Luc Bovens (eds.), Nancy Cartwright's Philosophy of Science. Routledge. 38--40.score: 240.0
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  10. Nancy Cartwright (2008). Reply to Ulrich Gähde. In Nancy Cartwright, Stephan Hartmann, Carl Hoefer & Luc Bovens (eds.), Nancy Cartwright's Philosophy of Science. Routledge. 65--6.score: 240.0
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  11. Nancy Cartwright (1983). How the Laws of Physics Lie. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    In this sequence of philosophical essays about natural science, the author argues that fundamental explanatory laws, the deepest and most admired successes of modern physics, do not in fact describe regularities that exist in nature. Cartwright draws from many real-life examples to propound a novel distinction: that theoretical entities, and the complex and localized laws that describe them, can be interpreted realistically, but the simple unifying laws of basic theory cannot.
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  12. Nancy Cartwright (2002). Against Modularity, the Causal Markov Condition, and Any Link Between the Two: Comments on Hausman and Woodward. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (3):411-453.score: 150.0
    In their rich and intricate paper ‘Independence, Invariance, and the Causal Markov Condition’, Daniel Hausman and James Woodward ([1999]) put forward two independent theses, which they label ‘level invariance’ and ‘manipulability’, and they claim that, given a specific set of assumptions, manipulability implies the causal Markov condition. These claims are interesting and important, and this paper is devoted to commenting on them. With respect to level invariance, I argue that Hausman and Woodward's discussion is confusing because, as I point out, (...)
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  13. Nancy Cartwright & Martin Jones (1991). How to Hunt Quantum Causes. Erkenntnis 35 (1-3):205 - 231.score: 150.0
    Reichenbach worked in an era when philosophers were hopeful about the unity of science, and particularly about unity of method. He looked for universal tests of causal connectedness that could be applied across disciplines and independently of specific modeling assumptions. The hunt for quantum causes reminds us that his hopes were too optimistic. The mark method is not even a starter in testing for causal links between outcomes in E.P.R., because our background hypotheses about these links are too thin to (...)
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  14. Nancy Cartwright (1989). Nature's Capacities and Their Measurement. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    Ever since David Hume, empiricists have barred powers and capacities from nature. In this book Cartwright argues that capacities are essential in our scientific world, and, contrary to empiricist orthodoxy, that they can meet sufficiently strict demands for testability. Econometrics is one discipline where probabilities are used to measure causal capacities, and the technology of modern physics provides several examples of testing capacities (such as lasers). Cartwright concludes by applying the lessons of the book about capacities and probabilities (...)
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  15. A. D. Barbour, D. I. Cartwright, J. B. Donnelly & G. K. Eagleson (1985). A New Rank Test for the K-Sample Problem. History and Philosophy of Logic 14 (6).score: 140.0
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  16. Mauricio Suárez & Nancy Cartwright (2007). Theories: Tools Versus Models. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (1):62-81.score: 120.0
    In “The Toolbox of Science” (1995) together with Towfic Shomar we advocated a form of instrumentalism about scientific theories. We separately developed this view further in a number of subsequent works. Steven French, James Ladyman, Otavio Bueno and Newton Da Costa (FLBD) have since written at least eight papers and a book criticising our work. Here we defend ourselves. First we explain what we mean in denying that models derive from theory – and why their failure to do so should (...)
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  17. Nancy Cartwright (1979). Causal Laws and Effective Strategies. Noûs 13 (4):419-437.score: 120.0
    La autora presenta algunas criticas generales al proyecto de reducir las leyes causales a probabilidades. Además, muestra que las leyes causales son imprescindibles para poder diferenciar las strategias efectivas de las que no lo son y da un criterio para considerar cuando podemos deducir causalidad a través de datos estadísticos.
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  18. Nancy Cartwright (1997). Where Do Laws of Nature Come From? Dialectica 51 (1):65–78.score: 120.0
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  19. Nancy Cartwright (2004). Causation: One Word, Many Things. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):805-819.score: 120.0
    We currently have on offer a variety of different theories of causation. Many are strikingly good, providing detailed and plausible treatments of exemplary cases; and all suffer from clear counterexamples. I argue that, contra Hume and Kant, this is because causation is not a single, monolithic concept. There are different kinds of causal relations imbedded in different kinds of systems, readily described using thick causal concepts. Our causal theories pick out important and useful structures that fit some familiar cases—cases we (...)
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  20. Nancy Cartwright (1980). The Truth Doesn't Explain Much. American Philosophical Quarterly 17 (2):159 - 163.score: 120.0
  21. Nancy Cartwright (2002). In Favor of Laws That Are Not Ceteris Paribus After All. Erkenntnis 57 (3):425Ð439.score: 120.0
    Opponents of ceteris paribus laws are apt to complain that the laws are vague and untestable. Indeed, claims to this effect are made by Earman, Roberts and Smith in this volume. I argue that these kinds of claims rely on too narrow a view about what kinds of concepts we can and do regularly use in successful sciences and on too optimistic a view about the extent of application of even our most successful non-ceteris paribus laws. When it comes to (...)
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  22. Hasok Chang & Nancy Cartwright (1993). Causality and Realism in the EPR Experiment. Erkenntnis 38 (2):169 - 190.score: 120.0
    We argue against the common view that it is impossible to give a causal account of the distant correlations that are revealed in EPR-type experiments. We take a realistic attitude about quantum mechanics which implies a willingness to modify our familiar concepts according to its teachings. We object to the argument that the violation of factorizability in EPR rules out causal accounts, since such an argument is at best based on the desire to retain a classical description of nature that (...)
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  23. Nancy Cartwright (1978). The Only Real Probabilities in Quantum Mechanics. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1978:54 - 59.score: 120.0
    Position probabilities play a privileged role in the interpretation of quantum mechanics. The standard interpretation has it that |Ψ (r)| 2 represents the probability that the system is at (or will be found at) the location r. Use of these probabilities, however, creates tremendous conceptual difficulties. It forces us either to adopt a non-standard logic, or to be saddled with an intractable measurement problem. This paper proposes that we try to eliminate position probabilities, and instead to interpret quantum mechanics (...)
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  24. Nancy Cartwright (2010). What Are Randomised Controlled Trials Good For? Philosophical Studies 147 (1):59 - 70.score: 120.0
    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are widely taken as the gold standard for establishing causal conclusions. Ideally conducted they ensure that the treatment ‘causes’ the outcome—in the experiment. But where else? This is the venerable question of external validity. I point out that the question comes in two importantly different forms: Is the specific causal conclusion warranted by the experiment true in a target situation? What will be the result of implementing the treatment there? This paper explains how the probabilistic theory (...)
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  25. Nancy Cartwright (1997). Models: The Blueprints for Laws. Philosophy of Science 64 (4):303.score: 120.0
    In this paper the claim that laws of nature are to be understood as claims about what necessarily or reliably happens is disputed. Laws can characterize what happens in a reliable way, but they do not do this easily. We do not have laws for everything occurring in the world, but only for those situations where what happens in nature is represented by a model: models are blueprints for nomological machines, which in turn give rise to laws. An example from (...)
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  26. Nancy Cartwright (2009). Evidence-Based Policy: What's to Be Done About Relevance? [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 143 (1):127 - 136.score: 120.0
    How can philosophy of science be of more practical use? One thing we can do is provide practicable advice about how to determine when one empirical claim is relevant to the truth of another; i.e., about evidential relevance. This matters especially for evidence-based policy, where advice is thin—and misleading—about how to tell what counts as evidence for policy effectiveness. This paper argues that good efficacy results (as in randomized controlled trials), which are all the rage now, are only a very (...)
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  27. Nancy Cartwright (1974). Van Fraassen's Modal Model of Quantum Mechanics. Philosophy of Science 41 (2):199-202.score: 120.0
  28. Sheldon Steed, Gabriele Contessa & Nancy Cartwright (2011). Keeping Track of Neurath's Bill: Abstract Concepts, Stock Models, and the Unity of Classical Physics. In Olga Pombo, John Symons & Juan Manuel Torres (eds.), Otto Neurath and the Unity of Science. Kluwer.score: 120.0
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  29. Nancy Cartwright (2009). If No Capacities Then No Credible Worlds. But Can Models Reveal Capacities? Erkenntnis 70 (1):45 - 58.score: 120.0
    This paper argues that even when simple analogue models picture parallel worlds, they generally still serve as isolating tools. But there are serious obstacles that often stop them isolating in just the right way. These are obstacles that face any model that functions as a thought-experiment but they are especially pressing for economic models because of the paucity of economic principles. Because of the paucity of basic principles, economic models are rich in structural assumptions. Without these no interesting conclusions can (...)
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  30. Nancy Cartwright (1993). In Defence of `This Worldly' Causality: Comments on Van Fraassen's Laws and Symmetry. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (2):423-429.score: 120.0
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  31. Nancy Cartwright (1991). Can Wholism Reconcile the Inaccuracy of Theory with the Accuracy of Prediction? Synthese 89 (1):3 - 13.score: 120.0
    Work by social constructionists over the past decade and a half has reenforced the epistemological pessimist's despair that our system of science could ever be a mirror of nature. Realists argue that the amazing success of modern science at precise prediction and control indicates just the contrary. In response, social constructionists often point out that these successes seldom apply to the world as it comes naturally, but only as it is reconstructed in the scientist's laboratory. But this does not explain (...)
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  32. Nancy Cartwright, No God, No Laws.score: 120.0
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  33. Nancy Cartwright, Another Philosopher Looks at Quantum Mechanics.score: 120.0
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  34. Nancy Cartwright (1994). Fundamentalism Vs. The Patchwork of Laws. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 94:279 - 292.score: 120.0
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  35. Nancy Cartwright & Eileen Munro (2010). The Limitations of Randomized Controlled Trials in Predicting Effectiveness. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):260-266.score: 120.0
    What kinds of evidence reliably support predictions of effectiveness for health and social care interventions? There is increasing reliance, not only for health care policy and practice but also for more general social and economic policy deliberation, on evidence that comes from studies whose basic logic is that of JS Mill's method of difference. These include randomized controlled trials, case–control studies, cohort studies, and some uses of causal Bayes nets and counterfactual-licensing models like ones commonly developed in econometrics. The topic (...)
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  36. Nancy Cartwright & Sophia Efstathiou (2011). Hunting Causes and Using Them: Is There No Bridge From Here to There? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (3):223 - 241.score: 120.0
    Causation is in trouble?at least as it is pictured in current theories in philosophy and in economics as well, where causation is also once again in fashion. In both disciplines the accounts of causality on offer are either modelled too closely on one or another favoured method for hunting causes or on assumptions about the uses to which causal knowledge can be put?generally for predicting the results of our efforts to change the world. The first kind of account supplies no (...)
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  37. Nancy Cartwright (2004). From Causation to Explanation and Back. In Brian Leiter (ed.), The Future for Philosophy. Clarendon Press.score: 120.0
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  38. Nancy Cartwright (1995). False Idealisation: A Philosophical Threat to Scientific Method. Philosophical Studies 77 (2-3):339 - 352.score: 120.0
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  39. Nancy Cartwright (2010). Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics • by N Ancy C Artwright. Analysis 70 (2):307-310.score: 120.0
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  40. Damien Fennell & Nancy Cartwright (2010). Does Roush Show That Evidence Should Be Probable? Synthese 175 (3):289 - 310.score: 120.0
    This paper critically analyzes Sherrilyn Roush's (Tracking truth: knowledge, evidence and science, 2005) definition of evidence and especially her powerful defence that in the ideal, a claim should be probable to be evidence for anything. We suggest that Roush treats not one sense of 'evidence' but three: relevance, leveraging and grounds for knowledge; and that different parts of her argument fare differently with respect to different senses. For relevance, we argue that probable evidence is sufficient but not necessary for Roush's (...)
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  41. Nancy Cartwright, Models and the Limits of Theory: Quantum Hamiltonians and the BCS Model of Superconductivity.score: 120.0
  42. John Dupré & Nancy Cartwright (1988). Probability and Causality: Why Hume and Indeterminism Don't Mix. Noûs 22 (4):521-536.score: 120.0
  43. Nancy Cartwright, Reply to P. Andersons Review of "The Dappled World".score: 120.0
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  44. Nancy Cartwright (2002). Book Review: Introduction and Reply to-the Dappled World: A Study of the Boundaries of Science. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 43 (4):241-278.score: 120.0
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  45. Nancy Cartwright (1999). The Limits of Exact Science, From Economics to Physics. Perspectives on Science 7 (3):318-336.score: 120.0
    : The idea of an exact science unified and complete has been advocated throughout the history of thought, but the sciences continue to cover only small patches of the world we live in. We may dream that the exact sciences will some day cover everything. But I argue that the very ways we do our exact sciences when they are most successfully done seems likely to confine them within limited domains. I discuss three cases to illustrate: the use of broad-scale (...)
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  46. Nancy Cartwright, Anna Alexandrova, Andrew Hamilton Sophia Efstathiou & Ioan Muntean (2005). Laws. In Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
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  47. Nancy Cartwright (1985). Book Review:Quantum Theory and Measurement John Archibald Wheeler, Wojciech Hubert Zurek. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 52 (3):480-.score: 120.0
  48. Nancy Cartwright, Against 'The System'.score: 120.0
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