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  1. Nancy Fraser (2014). Justice Interruptus: Critical Reflections on the "Postsocialist" Condition. Routledge.
    Refuting the argument to choose between "the politics of recognition" and the "politics of redistribution," _Justice Interruptus_ integrates the best aspects of both. ********************************************************* ** What does it mean to think critically about politics at a time when inequality is increasing worldwide, when struggles for the recognition of difference are eclipsing struggles for social equality, and when we lack any credible vision of an alternative to the present order? Philosopher Nancy Fraser claims that the key is to overcome the false (...)
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  2.  73
    Nancy Fraser (2003). Redistribution or Recognition?: A Political-Philosophical Exchange. Verso.
    This volume stages a debate between two philosophers, one North American, the other German, who hold different views of the relation of redistribution to ...
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  3.  99
    Nancy Fraser (1997). Justice Interruptus: Critical Reflections on the "Postsocialist" Condition. Routledge.
    What does it mean to think critically about politics at a time when inequality is increasing worldwide, when struggles for the recognition of difference are eclipsing struggles for social equality, and when we lack any credible vision of an alternative to the present order? Philosopher Nancy Fraser claims that the key is to overcome the false oppositions of "postsocialist" commonsense. Refuting the view that we must choose between "the politics of recognition" and the "politics of redistribution," Fraser argues for an (...)
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  4. Nancy Fraser (1989). Unruly Practices : Power, Discourse, and Gender in Contemporary Social Theory. University of Minnesota Press..
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  5. Nancy Fraser (2013). Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge.
    This unique volume presents a debate between four of the top feminist theorists in the US today, discussing the key questions facing contemporary feminist theory, responding to each other, and distinguishing their views from others.
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  6. Nancy Fraser (2009). Scales of Justice: Reimagining Political Space in a Globalizing World. Columbia University Press.
    Targeting injustices that cut across borders, they are making the scale of justice an object of explicit struggle.Inspired by these efforts, Nancy Fraser asks: ...
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  7. Frederick Neuhouser, Jay M. Bernstein, Michael Quante, Ludwig Siep, Terry Pinkard, Daniel Brudney, Andreas Wildt, Nancy Fraser, Axel Honneth, Emmanuel Renault, Hans-Christoph Schmidt am Busch, Jean-Philippe Deranty & Arto Laitinen (2009). The Philosophy of Recognition: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Lexington Books.
    This volume collects original, cutting-edge essays on the philosophy of recognition by international scholars eminent in the field. By considering the topic of recognition as addressed by both classical and contemporary authors, the volume explores the connections between historical and contemporary recognition research and makes substantive contributions to the further development of contemporary theories of recognition.
     
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  8. Nancy Fraser (1994). After the Family Wage: Gender Equity and the Welfare State. Political Theory 22 (4):591-618.
  9. Nancy Fraser (2007). Re-Faming Justice in a Globalizing World. In Terry Lovell (ed.), (Mis)Recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice: Nancy Fraser and Pierre Bourdieu. Routledge
  10. Nancy Fraser (1995). False Antitheses: A Response to Seyla Benhabib and Judith Butler. In Seyla Benhabib (ed.), Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge 71--26.
  11. Nancy Fraser (1995). Recognition or Redistribution? A Critical Reading of Iris Young's Justice and the Politics of Difference. Journal of Political Philosophy 3 (2):166–180.
  12.  16
    Nancy Fraser (2008). Abnormal Justice. Critical Inquiry 34 (3):393-422.
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  13.  11
    Nancy Fraser (forthcoming). 19 Recognition or Redistribution? Contemporary Political Theory: A Reader.
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  14.  14
    Nancy Fraser (2007). Identity, Exclusion, and Critique A Response to Four Critics. European Journal of Political Theory 6 (3):305-338.
    In this article I reply to four critics. Responding to Linda Alcoff, I contend that my original two-dimensional framework discloses the entwinement of economic and cultural strands of subordination, while also illuminating the dangers of identity politics. Responding to James Bohman, I maintain that, with the addition of the third dimension of representation, my approach illuminates the structural exclusion of the global poor, the relation between justice and democracy, and the status of comprehensive theorizing. Responding to Nikolas Kompridis, I defend (...)
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  15. Nancy Fraser (1985). Michel Foucault: A "Young Conservative"? Ethics 96 (1):165-184.
  16. Nancy Fraser, Axel Honneth & Burckhardt Wolf (2005). Umverteilung oder Anerkennung? Eine politisch-philosophische Kontroverse. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 67 (1):178-182.
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  17.  92
    Nancy Fraser (2005). Mapping the Feminist Imagination:From Redistribution to Recognition to Representation. Constellations 12 (3):295-307.
  18.  66
    Nancy Fraser (1987). Women, Welfare and the Politics of Need Interpretation. Hypatia 2 (1):103-121.
    I argue that social- welfare struggles should become more central for feminists. To clarify these, I offer an analysis of the U.S. welfare system. I expose the system's underlying gender norms and show how administrative practices preemptively define women's needs. I then situate these state practices in a larger terrain of struggle over the interpretation of social needs where feminists can intervene.
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  19.  81
    Nancy Fraser (1989). Talking About Needs: Interpretive Contests as Political Conflicts in Welfare-State Societies. Ethics 99 (2):291-313.
  20.  16
    Nancy Fraser (2007). Feminist Politics in the Age of Recognition: A Two-Dimensional Approach to Gender Justice. Studies in Social Justice 1 (1):23-35.
    In the course of the last thirty years, feminist theories of gender have shifted from quasi-Marxist, labor-centered conceptions to putatively “post-Marxist”culture- and identity-based conceptions. Reflecting a broader political move from redistribution to recognition, this shift has been double-edged. On the one hand, it has broadened feminist politics to encompass legitimate issues of representation, identity, and difference. Yet, in the context of an ascendant neoliberalism, feminist struggles for recognition may be serving to less to enrich struggles for redistribution than to displace (...)
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  21.  4
    Nancy Fraser (2001). Recognition Without Ethics? Theory, Culture and Society 18 (2-3):21-42.
    In the course of the last 30 years, feminist theories of gender have shifted from quasi-Marxist, labor-centered conceptions to putatively ‘post-Marxist’ culture-and identity-based conceptions. Reflecting a broader political move from redistribution to recognition, this shift has been double edged. On the one hand, it has broadened feminist politics to encompass legitimate issues of representation, identity and difference. Yet, in the context of an ascendant neoliberalism, feminist struggles for recognition may be serving less to enrich struggles for redistribution than to displace (...)
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  22.  40
    Nancy Fraser (2003). From Discipline to Flexibilization? Rereading Foucault in the Shadow of Globalization. Constellations 10 (2):160-171.
  23. Nancy Fraser & Sandra Lee Bartky (1992). Revaluing French Feminism Critical Essays on Difference, Agency, and Culture. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  24. Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Sandra Lee Bartky, Susan Bordo, Rosi Braidotti, Susan J. Brison, Judith Butler, Drucilla L. Cornell, Deirdre E. Davis, Nancy Fraser, Evelynn M. Hammonds, Nancy J. Hirschmann, Eva Feder Kittay, Sharon Marcus, Marsha Marotta, Julien S. Murphy, Iris MarionYoung & Linda M. G. Zerilli (2002). Gender Struggles: Practical Approaches to Contemporary Feminism. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The sixteen essays in Gender Struggles address a wide range of issues in gender struggles, from the more familiar ones that, for the last thirty years, have been the mainstay of feminist scholarship, such as motherhood, beauty, and sexual violence, to new topics inspired by post-industrialization and multiculturalism, such as the welfare state, cyberspace, hate speech, and queer politics, and finally to topics that traditionally have not been seen as appropriate subjects for philosophizing, such as adoption, care work, and the (...)
     
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  25.  21
    Nancy Fraser (forthcoming). Feminist Philosophy and the Genetic Fallacy. Hypatia.
  26.  80
    Nancy Fraser (2000). Why Overcoming Prejudice is Not Enough: A Rejoinder to Richard Rorty. Critical Horizons 1 (1):21-28.
    Misrecognition, taken seriously as unjust social subordination, cannot be remedied by eliminating prejudice alone. In this rejoinder to Richard Rorty, it is argued that a politics of recognition and a politics of redistribution can and should be combined. However, an identity politics that displaces redistribution and reifies group differences is deeply flawed. Here, instead, an alternative 'status' model of recognition politics is offered that encourages struggles to overcome status subordination and fosters parity of participation. Integrating this politics of recognition with (...)
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  27.  3
    Nancy Fraser (1988). Introduction. Hypatia 3 (3):1-10.
  28.  14
    Nancy Fraser (2006). Alienation in the Older Marx. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):319-339.
    Where alienation is concerned, the older Marx has something to puzzle everyone. There are far too many uses of terminology related to the concept of alienation for those who assert the existence of a break in Marx's work to feel comfortable. Yet, the older Marx's account of alienation is much too subordinate and sporadic to constitute a really clear demonstration that there is no break. Supporters of a break have largely ignored the passages in the older Marx, where the alienation (...)
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  29.  37
    Nancy Fraser (1996). Multiculturalism and Gender Equity: The U.S. "Difference" Debates Revisited. Constellations 3 (1):61-72.
  30. Nancy Fraser (1995). What's Critical About Critical Theory. In Johanna Meehan (ed.), Feminists Read Habermas: Gendering the Subject of Discourse. Routledge 21--55.
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  31. Nancy Fraser, Peter Schwenger, Robert Morris, Bruce Holsinger, Garrett Stewart, Kate McLoughlin, Fredric Jameson, Ian Hunter & W. J. T. Mitchell (2008). 10. Books of Critical Interest Books of Critical Interest (Pp. 622-631). Critical Inquiry 34 (3).
     
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  32. Nancy Fraser (1998). Another Pragmatism: Alain Locke, Critical 'Race'Theory, and the Politics of Culture. In Morris Dickstein (ed.), The Revival of Pragmatism: New Essays on Social Thought, Law, and Culture. Duke University Press 157--175.
     
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  33. Nancy Fraser & Axel Honneth (2001). Redistribution or Recognition? A Philosophical Exchange.
     
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  34.  9
    Nancy Fraser (1992). Sex, Lies, and the Public Sphere: Some Reflections on the Confirmation of Clarence Thomas. Critical Inquiry 18 (3):595-612.
    The recent struggle over the confirmation of Clarence Thomas and the credibility of Anita Hill raises in a dramatic and pointed way many of the issues at stake in theorizing the public sphere in contemporary society. At one level, the Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on Hill’s claim that Thomas sexually harassed her constituted an exercise in democratic publicity as it has been understood in the classical liberal theory of the public sphere. The hearings opened to public scrutiny a function of (...)
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  35.  11
    Nancy Fraser (forthcoming). Usos y abusos de las teorías francesas del discurso para la política feminista. Hypatia.
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  36.  9
    Nancy Fraser (2009). Social Justice in the Age of Identity Politics. In George L. Henderson & Marvin Waterstone (eds.), Geographic Thought : A Praxis Perspective. Routledge 72--91.
  37.  1
    Nancy Fraser (1987). Women, Welfare and The Politics of Need Interpretation. Hypatia 2 (1):103-121.
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  38.  18
    Nancy Fraser (1982). The Dialectic of Action. International Studies in Philosophy 14 (2):112-113.
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  39.  7
    Nancy Fraser (2010). ¿Quién cuenta? Dilemas de la justicia en un mundo postwestfaliano. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 44:311-328.
    E n est e ens a yo l a autor a present a u n model o alte r nat ivo a l imaginari o polític o w es t f alian o qu e reconoc e l a “justici a ano r mal ” com o e l horizont e dentr o de l cua l tiene n que pros e gui r actualment e toda s la s batalla s contr a l a injusticia . S e trat (...)
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  40.  7
    Nancy Fraser (1996). Redistribución y reconocimiento: hacia una visión integrada de justicia del género. Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 8:18-40.
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  41.  4
    Nancy Fraser & Linda Gordon (1992). Contrato versus caridad: una reconsideración de la relación entre ciudadanía civil y ciudadanía social. Isegoría 6:65-82.
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  42.  6
    Nancy Fraser (2009). Escalas de justicia. Traducción de Antoni Martínez Riu Barcelona: Herder, 294 p. Enrahonar 42:241.
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  43.  7
    Nancy Fraser (2004). Hannah Arendt in the 21st Century. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (3):253.
  44.  4
    Nancy Fraser (2005). Redefiniendo El Concepto de Justicia En Un Mundo Globalizado. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 39:69-105.
    Globalization is changing the way we argue about justice. Not so long ago, in the heyday of social democracy, disputes about justice presumed what I shall call a “Keynesian-Westphalian frame”. Typically played out within modern territorial states, arguments about justice were assumed to concern relations among fellow citizens, to be subject to debate within national publics, and to contemplate redress by national states. This was true for each of two major families of justice claims, claims for socioeconomic redistribution and claims (...)
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  45.  3
    Nancy Fraser (1991). “Double Trouble”: An Introduction. Hypatia 6 (2):152-154.
    This piece sets the scene for the inaugural addresses by Rosi Braidotti and Selma Sevenhuijsen which follow and provides background information on the history of women's studies in the Netherlands.
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  46.  3
    Nancy Fraser (1999). La giustizia sociale nell'era della politica dell'identità: redistribuzione, riconoscimento e partecipazione. Iride 12 (3):531-548.
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  47.  2
    Nancy Fraser (2004). Recognition as Justice? In Sinkwan Cheng (ed.), Law, Justice, and Power: Between Reason and Will. Stanford University Press 139.
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  48.  2
    Nancy Fraser (2012). Tales From the Trenches: On Women Philosophers, Feminist Philosophy, and the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (2):175-184.
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  49.  1
    Nancy Fraser & Muriel Valenta (2001). Repenser la Sphère Publique: Une Contribution À la Critique de la Démocratie Telle Qu'elle Existe Réellement : Extrait de Habermas and the Public Sphere, Sous la Direction de Craig Calhoun, Cambridge, MIT Press, 1992, P. 109-142. [REVIEW] Hermes 31:125.
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  50.  1
    Nancy Fraser (2010). Qui compte comme sujet de justice ? La communauté des citoyens, l'humanité toute entière ou la communauté transnationale du risque ? Rue Descartes 1 (1):50-59.
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