68 found
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  1.  8
    Lawrence J. Schneiderman, Nancy S. Jecker & Albert R. Jonsen (forthcoming). Medical Futility: Its Meaning and Ethical Implications. Bioethics.
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  2.  3
    Nancy S. Jecker (2013). Justice Between Age Groups: An Objection to the Prudential Lifespan Approach. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):3-15.
    Societal aging raises challenging ethical questions regarding the just distribution of health care between young and old. This article considers a proposal for age-based rationing of health care, which is based on the prudential life span account of justice between age groups. While important objections have been raised against the prudential life span account, it continues to dominate scholarly debates. This article introduces a new objection, one that develops out of the well-established disability critique of social contract theories. I show (...)
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  3.  8
    Nancy S. Jecker (2008). A Broader View of Justice. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):2 – 10.
    In this paper I argue that a narrow view of justice dominates the bioethics literature. I urge a broader view. As bioethicists, we often conceive of justice using a medical model. This model focuses attention at a particular point in time, namely, when someone who is already sick seeks access to scarce or expensive services. A medical model asks how we can fairly distribute those services. The broader view I endorse requires looking upstream, and asking how disease and suffering came (...)
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  4.  3
    Nancy S. Jecker (2015). Futility and Fairness: A Defense of the Texas Advance Directive Law. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):43-46.
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  5.  1
    Nancy S. Jecker (2015). Rethinking Rescue Medicine. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (2):12-18.
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  6.  30
    Nancy S. Jecker (2007). Medical Futility: A Paradigm Analysis. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 19 (1):13-32.
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  7.  10
    Nancy S. Jecker (2008). The Role of Standpoint in Justice Theory. Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (2):165-182.
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  8.  13
    Nancy S. Jecker, Joseph A. Carrese & Robert A. Pearlman (1995). Caring for Patients in Cross‐Cultural Settings. Hastings Center Report 25 (1):6-14.
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  9.  3
    Nancy S. Jecker (2008). Just Healthcare for Combatants. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):13 – 14.
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  10.  1
    Nancy S. Jecker (2002). Exploiting Subjects in Placebo-Controlled Trials. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):19 – 20.
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  11.  3
    Nancy S. Jecker (1991). Knowing When to Stop: The Limits of Medicine. Hastings Center Report 21 (3):5-8.
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  12.  16
    Nancy S. Jecker (2005). Health Care Reform: What History Doesn't Teach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (4):277-305.
    The paper begins by tracing the historical development of American medicine as practice, profession, and industry from the eighteenth century to the present. This historical outline emphasizes shifting conceptions of physicians and physician ethics. It lays the basis for showing, in the second section, how contemporary controversies about the physician’s role in managed care take root in medicine’s past. In the final two sections, I revisit both the historical analysis and its application to contemporary debates. I argue that historical narratives (...)
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  13.  29
    Nancy S. Jecker (2002). Taking Care of One's Own: Justice and Family Caregiving. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (2):117-133.
    This paper asks whether adult children have aduty of justice to act as caregivers for theirfrail, elderly parents. I begin (Sections I.and II.) by locating the historical reasons whyrelationships within families were not thoughtto raise issues of justice. I argue that thesereasons are misguided. The paper next presentsspecific examples showing the relevance ofjustice to family relationships. I point outthat in the United States today, the burden ofcaregiving for dependent parents fallsdisproportionately on women (Sections III. andIV.). The paper goes on to (...)
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  14.  20
    Nancy S. Jecker (1989). Are Filial Duties Unfounded? American Philosophical Quarterly 26 (1):73 - 80.
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  15.  25
    Nancy S. Jecker (1987). The Ascription of Rights in Wrongful Life Suits. Law and Philosophy 6 (2):149-165.
    Wrongful life is an action brought by a defective child who sues to recover for pecuniary or emotional damages suffered as a result of being conceived or born with deformities. In such cases, plaintiff alleges that the negligence of a responsible third party,1 such as physician, hospital, or medical laboratory, is the proximate cause of plaintiff's being born or conceived and thus being compelled to suffer the debilitating effects of a deformity. The child does not sue to recover for the (...)
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  16.  2
    Nancy S. Jecker & Albert R. Jonsen (1997). Managed Care: A House of Mirrors. Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (3):230.
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  17.  20
    Nancy S. Jecker & Lawrence J. Schneiderman (1993). Medical Futility: The Duty Not to Treat. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (2):151.
    Partly because physicians can “never say never,” partly because of the seduction of modern technology, and partly out of misplaced fear of litigation, physicians have increasingly shown a tendency to undertake treatments that have no realistic expectation of success. For this reason, we have articulated common sense criteria for medical futility. If a treatment can be shown not to have worked in the last 100 cases, we propose that it be regarded as medically futile. Also, if the treatment fails to (...)
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  18.  8
    Nancy S. Jecker (1989). Book Review. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 8 (2):115-141.
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  19.  11
    Nancy S. Jecker (2004). Protecting the Vulnerable. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):60-62.
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  20.  4
    Lawrence J. Schneiderman & Nancy S. Jecker (1996). Is the Treatment Beneficial, Experimental, or Futile? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (2):248.
    D.T. a 35-year-old woman, was found to have breast cancer. At the time of mastectomy axillary lymph nodes were positive and the cancer was classified as adenocarcinoma, grade 4. The patient underwent conventional chemotherapy. When it became apparent the disease was metastatic, the patient's oncologist contacted a well-known cancer center regarding the possibility of treating the patient with high dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation. The patient's health insurance provider informed the patient, however, that the treatment—estimated to cost in (...)
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  21.  1
    Nancy S. Jecker (1994). Calling It Quits: Stopping Futile Treatment and Caring for Patients. Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (2):138.
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  22.  9
    Nancy S. Jecker (1990). Integrating Medical Ethics with Normative Theory: Patient Advocacy and Social Responsibility. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (2).
    It is often assumed that the chief responsibility medical professionals bear is patient care and advocacy. The meeting of other duties, such as ensuring a more just distribution of medical resources and promoting the public good, is not considered a legitimate basis for curtailing or slackening beneficial patient services. It is argued that this assumption is often made without sufficient attention to foundational principles of professional ethics; that once core principles are laid bare this assumption is revealed as largely unwarranted; (...)
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  23.  16
    Nancy S. Jecker & Lawrence J. Schneiderman (1995). Judging Medical Futility: An Ethical Analysis of Medical Power and Responsibility. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (1):23.
    In situations where experience shows that a particular intervention will not benefit a patient, common sense seems to suggest that the intervention should not be used. Yet it is precisely in these situations that a peculiar ethic begins to operate, an ethic that Eddy calls “the criterion of potential benefit.” According to this ethic, “a treatment is appropriate if it might have some benefit.” Thus, the various maxims learned in medical school instruct physicians that “‘an error of commission is to (...)
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  24.  15
    Nancy S. Jecker (1987). Reproductive Risk Taking and the Nonidentity Problem. Social Theory and Practice 13 (2):219-235.
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  25. Robert A. Pearlman, Richard F. Uhlmann & Nancy S. Jecker (1992). Spousal Understanding of Patient Quality of Life: Implications for Surrogate Decisions. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (2):114.
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  26.  4
    Nancy S. Jecker (2001). Uncovering Cultural Bias in Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):49-50.
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  27.  11
    Nancy S. Jecker (forthcoming). Applying Ethical Reasoning: Philosophical, Clinical, and Cultural Challenges. Bioethics.
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  28.  13
    Nancy S. Jecker (1990). Anencephalic Infants and Special Relationships. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (4).
    This paper investigates the scope and limits of parents' and physicians' obligations to anencephalic newborns. Special attention is paid to the permissibility of harvesting anencephalic organs for transplant. My starting point is to identify the general justification for treating patients in order to benefit third parties. This analysis reveals that the presence of a close relationship between patients and beneficiaries is often crucial to justifying treating in these cases. In particular, the proper interpretation of the Kantian injunction against treating persons (...)
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  29.  32
    Lawrence J. Schneiderman & Nancy S. Jecker (1996). Should a Criminal Receive a Heart Transplant? Medical Justice Vs. Societal Justice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    Should the nation provide expensive care and scarce organs to convicted felons? We distinguish between two fields of justice: Medical Justice and Societal Justice. Although there is general acceptance within the medical profession that physicians may distribute limited treatments based solely on potential medical benefits without regard to nonmedical factors, that does not mean that society cannot impose limits based on societal factors. If a society considers the convicted felon to be a full member, then that person would be entitled (...)
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  30.  32
    Nancy S. Jecker & Eric M. Meslin (1994). United States and Canadian Approaches to Justice in Health Care: A Comparative Analysis of Health Care Systems and Values. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (2).
    The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the basic ethical values underpinning national health care policies in the United States and Canada. We use the framework of ethical theory to name and elaborate ethical values and to facilitate moral reflection about health care reform.Section one describes historical and contemporary social contract theories and clarifies the ethical values associated with them. Sections two and three show that health care debates and health care systems in both countries reflect the (...)
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  31.  4
    Nancy S. Jecker (1990). Conceiving a Child to Save a Child: Reproductive and Filial Ethics. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (2):99.
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  32.  12
    Nancy S. Jecker (1992). Should HECs Initiate Policies to Prevent Recurring Bioethical Dilemmas? Yes: HECs Should Initiate Such Policies. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 4 (4):273-276.
    Since the role of HECs continues to evolve, it is important for those of us who serve on these committees to remain alert to new avenues for improving patient care within our institutions.
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  33.  11
    Nancy S. Jecker (1989). Towards a Theory of Age-Group Justice. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (6):655-676.
    Norman Daniels' and Daniel Callahan's recent work attempts to develop and deepen theories of justice in order to accommodate intergenerational moral issues. Elsewhere, I have argued that Callahan's arguments furnish inadequate support for the age rationing policy he accepts. This essay therefore examines Daniel's account of age rationing, together with the complex theory of age-group justice that buttresses it. Sections one and two trace the main features of Daniels' prudential lifespan approach. Section three calls into question the theory's conformity to (...)
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  34.  10
    Nancy S. Jecker (2010). Animal Subjects Research Part I: Do Animals Have Rights? In G. A. van Norman, S. Jackson, S. H. Rosenbaum & S. K. Palmer (eds.), Clinical Ethics in Anesthesiology. Cambridge University Press 168.
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  35.  3
    Nancy S. Jecker (2003). New Challenges for Ethics Consultation: Combining Feminism, Multiculturalism, and Caring. Public Affairs Quarterly 17 (2):83-95.
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  36.  1
    Nancy S. Jecker (1990). Appeals to Nature in Theories of Age-Group Justice. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 33 (4):517-527.
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  37.  1
    Nancy S. Jecker (1989). Should We Ration Health Care? Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (2):77-90.
    The paper begins by drawing a distinction between “allocation” — the distribution of resources between different categories, and “rationing” — the distribution of scarce resources within a single category. I argue that the current allocation of funds to health care makes some form of rationing unavoidable. The paper next considers proposals by Daniel Callahan and Norman Daniels supporting age rationing publicly-financed life-extending medical care. I provide reasons for doubting that either argument succeeds. The final section of the paper sets forth (...)
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  38.  19
    Nancy S. Jecker & Andrea E. Glassberg (1997). The Ethics of Human Gene Therapy, by LeRoy Walters and Julie Gage Palmer. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. 209 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):494.
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  39.  2
    Nancy S. Jecker (1988). Disenfranchising the Elderly From Life-Extending Medical Care. Public Affairs Quarterly 2 (3):51-68.
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  40.  13
    Nancy S. Jecker (2012). The Right Not to Be Born: Reinterpreting the Nonidentity Problem. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):34 - 35.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 8, Page 34-35, August 2012.
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  41.  18
    Nancy S. Jecker & Courtney S. Campbell (1994). Life's Dominion: An Argument About Abortion, Euthanasia, and Individual Freedom, Ronald Dworkin. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993. 273 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (2):303.
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  42.  1
    Nancy S. Jecker (1993). Genetic Testing and the Social Responsibility of Private Health Insurance Companies. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 21 (1):109-116.
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  43.  6
    Nancy S. Jecker (1989). The Ubiquity of Culture. Hastings Center Report 19 (6):46-47.
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  44.  1
    Nancy S. Jecker (1993). The Healer's Power. Howard Brody. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 1992. 311 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (4):557.
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  45.  7
    Nancy S. Jecker (1995). Is Refusal of Futile Treatment Unjustified Paternalism? Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (2):133.
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  46.  19
    Nancy S. Jecker (2009). Physician-Assisted Death in the Pacific Northwest. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):1 – 2.
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  47.  18
    Mary Ann Carroll, James Lindemann Nelson & Nancy S. Jecker (1993). Book Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 27 (2):375-378.
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  48.  11
    Nancy S. Jecker (1995). Review: Why Is Death Bad and What Makes It Least Bad? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 14 (3/4):411 - 415.
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  49.  14
    Nancy S. Jecker (1992). Intergenerational Justice and the Family. Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (4):495-509.
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  50.  10
    Nancy S. Jecker (1996). Caring for “Socially Undesirable” Patients. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (4):500.
    Mr. Bernard was a homeless man, aged 58. His medical history revealed alcohol abuse, seizure disorder, and two suicide attempts. Brought to the emergency room at a local hospital after being found “semi-comatose,” his respiratory distress led to his being intubated and placed on a ventilator. The healthcare team suspected the patient ingested antifreeze. Transferred from that hospital to the intensive care unit of the university hospital, his diagnosis was “high osmolar gap with high-anion gap metabolic acidosis, most likely secondary (...)
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