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  1. Naoko Saito (2015). Taking a Chance: Education for Aesthetic Judgment and the Criticism of Culture. Ethics and Education 10 (1):96-104.
    This article explores the possibilities of the antifoundationalist thought of Cavell with a particular focus on his idea of chance in aesthetic experience, as a framework through which to destabilize the prevailing discourse of education centering on freedom and control. I try to present the idea of chance in a particular way, which does not identify it with chaos or limitlessness but takes it rather as a condition of meaning-making, and more generally of a perfecting of culture, of a conscientious (...)
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  2. Naoko Saito (2012). Is Thoreau More Cosmopolitan Than Dewey? The Pluralist 7 (3):71-85.
    In 1921 John Dewey published an article on "mutual national understanding" based upon his real experience of encountering foreign cultures in Japan and China ("Creative Democracy" 228). The article echoes his democratic spirit of learning from difference beyond national and cultural boundaries. The vitality of his American philosophy and its potency in a global context are still evident today. Some of the recent research on Dewey is plain enough evidence of this (Hickman; Hansen). Neither fixed within national ground nor appealing (...)
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  3. Naoko Saito (2011). Becoming Cosmopolitan: On the Idea of a Japanese Response to American Philosophy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (4):507-523.
    To cooperate by giving differences a chance to show themselves because of the belief that the expression of difference is not only a right of the other persons but is a means of enriching one's life experience, is inherent in the democratic personal way of life.It was on 9 February 1919 that John Dewey, surely a principal representative of what could count as American philosophy, set foot in Japan. As the above words indicate, Dewey's idea of democracy as a way (...)
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  4. Naoko Saito (2011). From Meritocracy to Aristocracy: Towards a Just Society for the 'Great Man'. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):95-109.
    In the practice of education and educational reforms today ‘meritocracy’ is a prevalent mode of thinking and discourse. Behind political and economic debates over the just distribution of education benefits, other kinds of philosophical issues, concerning the question of democracy, await to be addressed. As a means of evoking a language more subtle than what is offered by political and economic solutions, I shall discuss Ralph Waldo Emerson's idea of perfectionism, particularly his ideas of the ‘gleam of light’ and ‘genius’, (...)
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  5. Naoko Saito (2011). Quiet Desperation, Secret Melancholy: Polemos and Passion in Citizenship Education. Ethics and Education 6 (1):3 - 14.
    Contemporary scenes of democracy and education exemplify a real scepticism about the point of political participation, and by implication about one's place in society in relation to others. What is called for is a recovery of desire per se ? of people's desire to say what they want to say and their desire to participate in the creation of the public. In response, this article examines Stanley Cavell's ordinary language philosophy. The way he reconstructs philosophy from the perspective of ordinary (...)
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  6. Naoko Saito & Paul Standish (eds.) (2011). Stanley Cavell and the Education of Grownups. Fordham University Press.
    This book takes Stanley Cavell's much-quoted, yet enigmatic phrase as the provocation for a series of explorations into themes of education that run throughout his work - through his response to Wittgenstein, Austin and ordinary language ...
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  7. Naoko Saito (2010). Beyond Monolingualism: Philosophy as Translation and the Understanding of Other Cultures. Ethics and Education 4 (2):131-139.
    Beyond a monolingual mentality and beyond the language that is typically observed in the prevalent discourse of education for understanding other cultures, this article tries to present another approach: Stanley Cavell's idea of philosophy as translation . This Cavellian approach shows that understanding foreign cultures involves a relation to other cultures already within one's native culture. Foreshadowing the Cavellian sense of tragedy, Emerson's 'Devil's child' helps us detect the sources of repression and blindness that are hidden behind the foundationalist approach (...)
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  8. Naoko Saito & Paul Standish (2010). Crossing Borders Within: Stanley Cavell and the Politics of Interpretation. Educational Theory 60 (4):419-433.
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  9. Naoko Saito (2009). Ourselves in Translation: Stanley Cavell and Philosophy as Autobiography. Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (2):253-267.
    This paper offers a different approach to writing about oneself—Stanley Cavell's idea of philosophy as autobiography. In Cavell's understanding, the acknowledgement of the partiality of the self is an essential condition for achieving the universal. In the apparently paradoxical combination of the 'philosophical' (which is traditionally connected with a search for the objective and the universal) and the 'autobiographical' (which is conventionally associated with the subjective and the personal), Cavell shows us a way of focusing on the self and yet (...)
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  10. Naoko Saito (2009). Reconstruction in Dewey's Pragmatism: Home, Neighborhood, and Otherness. Education and Culture 25 (2):pp. 101-114.
  11. Naoko Saito & Paul Standish (2009). What's the Problem with Problem-Solving? Language, Skepticism, and Pragmatism. Contemporary Pragmatism 6 (1):153-167.
    We critically examine pragmatism's approach to skepticism and try to elucidate its certain limits. The central questions to be addressed are: whether “skepticism” interpreted through the lens of problem-solving does justice to the human condition; and whether the problem-solving approach to skepticism can do justice to pragmatism's self-proclaimed anti-foundationalism. We then examine Stanley Cavell's criticism of Dewey's “problem-solving” approach. We propose a shift from the problem-solving approach's eagerness for solutions to a more Wittgensteinian and Emersonian project of dissolution.
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  12. Naoko Saito (2008). Reconsidering the Sense of the “Text-as-Friend”: Reply to Granger. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (6):481-484.
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  13. Naoko Saito (2007). Philosophy as Translation: Democracy and Education From Dewey to Cavell. Educational Theory 57 (3):261-275.
    Dewey’s idea of “mutual national understanding” faces new challenges in the age of globalization, especially in education for global understanding. In this essay Naoko Saito aims to find an alternative idea and language for “mutual national understanding,” one that is more attuned to the sensibility of our times. She argues for Stanley Cavell’s idea of philosophy as translation as such an alternative. Based upon Cavell’s rereading of Thoreau’s Walden, Saito represents Thoreau as a cross‐cultural figure who transcends cultural and national (...)
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  14. Naoko Saito (2007). Truth is Translated: Cavell's Thoreau and the Transcendence of America. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (2):124 - 132.
  15. Naoko Saito (2006). Philosophy as Education and Education as Philosophy: Democracy and Education From Dewey to Cavell. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (3):345–356.
    In the contemporary culture of accountability and the ‘economy’ of education this generates, pragmatism, as a philosophy for ordinary practice, needs to resist the totalising force of an ideology of practice, one that distracts us from the rich qualities of daily experience. In response to this need, and in mobilising Dewey's pragmatism, this paper introduces another standpoint in American philosophy: Stanley Cavell's account of the economy of living in Thoreau's Walden. By discussing some aspects of Cavell's The Senses of Walden (...)
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  16. Naoko Saito (2006). Perfectionism and the Love of Humanity: Democracy as a Way of Life After Dewey, Thoreau, and Cavell. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (2):93-105.
  17. Naoko Saito (2006). Reawakening Global Awareness: Deweyan Religious Democracy Reconsidered in the Age of Globalization. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (1-2):129-144.
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  18. Naoko Saito (2005). The Gleam of Light: Moral Perfectionism and Education in Dewey and Emerson. Fordham University Press.
    In the name of efficiency, the practice of education has come to be dominated by neoliberal ideology and procedures of standardization and quantification. Such attempts to make all aspects of practice transparent and subject to systematic accounting lack sensitivity to the invisible and the silent, to something in the human condition that cannot readily be expressed in an either-or form. Seeking alternatives to such trends, Saito reads Dewey’s idea of progressive education through the lens of Emersonian moral perfectionism (to borrow (...)
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  19. Naoko Saito (2004). Awakening My Voice: Learning From Cavell's Perfectionist Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (1):79–89.
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  20. Naoko Saito (2004). Citizenship Without Inclusion: Religious Democracy After Dewey, Emerson, and Thoreau. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):203-215.
  21. Naoko Saito (2003). Transcending the Tragic with Dewey and Emerson: Beyond the Morse-Boisvert Debate. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 39 (2):275 - 292.
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  22. Naoko Saito (2002). Pragmatism and the Tragic Sense: Deweyan Growth in an Age of Nihilism. Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):247–263.