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Profile: Naomi Reshotko (University of Denver)
Profile: Naomi Reshotko (University of Denver)
  1.  14
    Naomi Reshotko (2006). Socratic Virtue: Making the Best of the Neither-Good-nor-Bad. Cambridge University Press.
    Socrates was not a moral philosopher. Instead he was a theorist who showed how human desire and human knowledge complement one another in the pursuit of human happiness. His theory allowed him to demonstrate that actions and objects have no value other than that which they derive from their employment by individuals who, inevitably, desire their own happiness and have the knowledge to use actions and objects as a means for its attainment. The result is a naturalized, practical, and demystified (...)
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  2.  29
    Naomi Reshotko (1992). The Socratic Theory of Motivation. Apeiron 25 (3):145 - 170.
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  3.  20
    Naomi Reshotko (1997). Plato's "Lysis": A Socratic Treatise on Desire and Attraction. Apeiron 30 (1):1-18.
  4.  19
    Naomi Reshotko (2012). Socrates and Philosophy in the Dialogues of Plato. By Sandra Peterson. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):433-440.
  5. Naomi Reshotko (2013). Socratic Eudaimonism. In John Bussanich & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Socrates. Continuum
     
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  6.  12
    Naomi Reshotko (2014). Plato on the Ordinary Person and the Forms. Apeiron 47 (2):266-292.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Apeiron Jahrgang: 47 Heft: 2 Seiten: 266-292.
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  7.  9
    Naomi Reshotko (2009). Beyond De Re: Toward a Dominance Theory of Desire Attribution. Philosophical Inquiry 31 (1-2):131-151.
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  8.  6
    Naomi Reshotko (1995). A Reply to Penner and Rowe. Phronesis 40 (3):336-341.
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  9. Naomi Reshotko (1990). Dretske and Socrates: The Development of the Socratic Theme That "All Desire is for the Good" in a Contemporary Analysis of Desire. Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    I compare two theories of motivation: The Socratic Theory of Motivation and Fred Dretske's attempt to vindicate the use of desires in folk-psychological explanations. I find that, although Socrates ' theory is, at first glance, counterintuitive, while Dretske's provides persuasive analyses of beliefs and desires, there is a way of developing Dretske's theory which produces a theory that is parallel to the Socratic Theory of Motivation. In fact, if we substitute "all desire is for homeostasis" for the thesis that "all (...)
     
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  10.  19
    Naomi Reshotko (2001). Virtue as the Only Unconditional — But Not Intrinsic — Good. Ancient Philosophy 21 (2):325-334.
  11.  23
    Naomi Reshotko (2000). The Good, the Bad, and the Neither Good Nor Bad in Plato'sLysis. Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):251-262.
  12.  18
    Naomi Reshotko (1994). Heracleitean Flux in Plato's "Theaetetus". History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (2):139 - 161.
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  13.  16
    Naomi Reshotko (1997). The Third Way. Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):442-447.
  14.  5
    Naomi Reshotko (2009). Socrates and Plato on "Sophia, Eudaimonia", and Their Facsimiles. History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (1):1 - 19.
  15.  12
    Naomi Reshotko (1997). A Bastard Kind of Reasoning: The Argument From the Sciences and the Introduction of the Receptacle in Plato's "Timaeus". History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (1):121 - 137.
  16.  11
    Naomi Reshotko (1999). New Essays in Socratic Studies. Ancient Philosophy 19 (2):407-411.
  17. Naomi Reshotko (1996). Alfonso Gomez-Lobo, The Foundations of Socratic Ethics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (1):24-27.
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  18.  8
    Naomi Reshotko (1996). Do Explanatory Desire Attributions Generate Opaque Contexts? Ratio 9 (2):153-170.
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  19.  2
    Naomi Reshotko (2012). Socratic Eudaimonism and Natural Value. Journal of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1).
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  20. Naomi Reshotko (1996). Alfonso Gomez-Lobo, The Foundations of Socratic Ethics. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 16:24-27.
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  21. Naomi Reshotko & Terry Penner (eds.) (2003). Desire, Identity, and Existence: Essays in Honor of T.M. Penner. Academic Print. & Pub..
  22. Naomi Reshotko (ed.) (2003). Desire, Identity and Existence. Academic Printing and Publishing.
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  23. Naomi Reshotko (1996). Gregory Vlastos, Ed., Myles Burnyeat, Socratic Studies Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (1):24-27.
     
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  24. Naomi Reshotko (1996). Gregory Vlastos, Ed., Myles Burnyeat, Socratic Studies. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 16:24-27.
     
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  25. Naomi Reshotko (2016). Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the Protagoras by J. Clerk Shaw. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (2):334-335.
    Shaw introduces an important and compelling line of argumentation concerning the relationship between pleasure and the good into the literature on Plato’s dialogues with ramifications beyond any commitment that Plato has Socrates make to hedonism at Protagoras 351b–357e. To appreciate Shaw’s argument, the term ‘hedonism’ must be understood to indicate that the good is identical to bodily pleasure—not to both sensate and modal pleasure understood as a dichotomy, and not to all pleasures of the soul and body understood as a (...)
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  26. Naomi Reshotko (1997). Plato's Lysis: A Socratic Treatise on Desire and Attraction. Apeiron 30 (1):1-18.
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  27. Naomi Reshotko (2009). Socratic Virtue: Making the Best of the Neither-Good-nor-Bad. Cambridge University Press.
    Socrates was not a moral philosopher. Instead he was a theorist who showed how human desire and human knowledge complement one another in the pursuit of human happiness. His theory allowed him to demonstrate that actions and objects have no value other than that which they derive from their employment by individuals who, inevitably, desire their own happiness and have the knowledge to use actions and objects as a means for its attainment. The result is a naturalised, practical, and demystified (...)
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