Search results for 'Nathan Berg' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nathan Berg & Ulrich Hoffrage (2010). Compressed Environments: Unbounded Optimizers Should Sometimes Ignore Information. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 20 (2):259-275.score: 120.0
    Given free information and unlimited processing power, should decision algorithms use as much information as possible? A formal model of the decision-making environment is developed to address this question and provide conditions under which informationally frugal algorithms, without any information or processing costs whatsoever, are optimal. One cause of compression that allows optimal algorithms to rationally ignore information is inverse movement of payoffs and probabilities (e.g., high payoffs occur with low probably and low payoffs occur with high probability). If inversely (...)
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  2. Marco Monti, Riccardo Boero, Nathan Berg, Gerd Gigerenzer & Laura Martignon (2012). How Do Common Investors Behave? Information Search and Portfolio Choice Among Bank Customers and University Students. Mind and Society 11 (2):203-233.score: 120.0
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  3. Jonathan Berg (ed.) (1993). Holism: A Consumer Update. Amsterdam: Rodopi.score: 60.0
    Contents: Preface. Johannes BRANDL: Semantic Holism Is Here To Stay. Michael DEVITT: A Critique of the Case for Semantic Holism. Georges REY: The Unavailability of What We Mean: A Reply to Quine, Fodor and LePore. Joseph LEVINE: Intentional Chemistry. Louise ANTHONY: Conceptual Connection and the Observation/Theory Distinction. Gilbert HARMAN: Meaning Holism Defended. Kirk A. LUDWIG: Is Content Holism Incoherent? Anne BEZUIDENHOUT: The Impossibility of Punctate Mental Representations. Takashi YAGISAWA: The Cost of Meaning Solipsism. Alberto PERUZZI: Holism: The Polarized Spectrum. Jonathan (...)
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  4. Jonathan Berg (2012). Direct Belief: An Essay on the Semantics, Pragmatics, and Metaphysics of Belief. De Gruyter Mouton.score: 60.0
    Jonathan Berg argues for the Theory of Direct Belief, which treats having a belief about an individual as an unmediated relation between the believer and the individual the belief is about. After a critical review of alternative positions, Berg uses Grice's theory of conversational implicature to provide a detailed pragmatic account of substitution failure in belief ascriptions and goes on to defend this view against objections, including those based on an unwarranted "Inner Speech" Picture of Thought. The work (...)
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  5. Steven Berg (2010). Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment: On Plato's Symposium. State University of New York Press.score: 60.0
    Author Steven Berg offers an interpretation of this dialogue wherein all the speakers at the banquetwith the exception of Socratesnot only offer their views on ...
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  6. N. M. L. Nathan (2001). The Price of Doubt. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Are any of our beliefs justified? Are they rational? The skeptic thinks that our epistemic justifications are undeserved. Nicholas Nathan confronts the skeptic and questions the value of his argument. Skeptical arguments are against justified and rational belief as well as for ignorance. Nathan argues that the truth value of trivial arguments are a matter of indifference. He tests this conjecture with a varied collection of counterexamples: arguments for ignorance, neo-Cartesian and infinite regress arguments, and also more critically (...)
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  7. N. M. L. Nathan (1980). Evidence and Assurance. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    A systematic study of rational or justified belief, which throws fresh light on current debates about foundations and coherence theories of knowledge, the validation of induction and moral scepticism. Dr Nathan focuses attention on the largely unsatisfiable desires for active and self-conscious assurance of truth liable to be engendered by philosophical reflection about total belief-systems and the sources of knowledge. He extracts a kernel of truth from the doctrine that a regress of justification is both necessary and impossible, contrasts (...)
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  8. N. M. L. Nathan (1992). Will and World. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Beneath metaphysical problems there often lies a conflict between what we want to be true and what we believe to be true. Nathan provides a general account of the resolution of this conflict as a philosophical objective, showing that there are ways of thinking it through systematically with a view to resolving or alleviating it. The author also studies in detail a set of interrelated conflicts about the freedom and the reality of the will. He shows how difficult it (...)
     
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  9. N. M. L. Nathan (2005). Direct Realism: Proximate Causation and the Missing Object. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 20 (36):3-6.score: 30.0
    Direct Realists believe that perception involves direct awareness of an object not dependent for its existence on the perceiver. Howard Robinson rejects this doctrine in favour of a Sense-Datum theory of perception. His argument against Direct Realism invokes the principle ‘same proximate cause, same immediate effect’. Since there are cases in which direct awareness has the same proximate cerebral cause as awareness of a sense datum, the Direct Realist is, he thinks, obliged to deny this causal principle. I suggest that (...)
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  10. Christopher Nathan (2011). Need There Be a Defence of Equality? Winner of the 2010 Postgraduate Essay Prize. Res Publica 17 (3):211-225.score: 30.0
    There is an apparent problem in identifying a basis for equality. This problem vanishes if what I call the ‘intuited response’ is successful. According to this response, there is no further explanation of the significance of the feature in virtue of which an individual matters, beyond the bare fact that it is the feature in virtue of which an individual matters. I argue against this claim, and conclude that if the problem of identifying a basis for equality is to be (...)
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  11. Hans Van Den Berg, Dick Hoekzema & Hans Radder (1990). Accardi on Quantum Theory and the "Fifth Axiom" of Probability. Philosophy of Science 57 (1):149 - 157.score: 30.0
    In this paper we investigate Accardi's claim that the "quantum paradoxes" have their roots in probability theory and that, in particular, they can be evaded by giving up Bayes' rule, concerning the relation between composite and conditional probabilities. We reach the conclusion that, although it may be possible to give up Bayes' rule and define conditional probabilities differently, this contributes nothing to solving the philosophical problems which surround quantum mechanics.
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  12. Cheryl Berg & Kelly Fryer-Edwards (2008). The Ethical Challenges of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (1):17 - 31.score: 30.0
    Genetic testing is currently subject to little oversight, despite the significant ethical issues involved. Repeated recommendations for increased regulation of the genetic testing market have led to little progress in the policy arena. A 2005 Internet search identified 13 websites offering health-related genetic testing for direct purchase by the consumer. Further examination of these sites showed that overall, biotech companies are not providing enough information for consumers to make well-informed decisions; they are not consistently offering genetic counseling services; and some (...)
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  13. Jonathan Berg (1988). The Pragmatics of Substitutivity. Linguistics and Philosophy 11 (3):355 - 370.score: 30.0
  14. Jonathan Berg (1998). First-Person Authority, Externalism, and Wh-Knowledge. Dialectica 52 (1):41-44.score: 30.0
  15. Daniel O. Nathan (1982). Irony and the Artist's Intentions. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (3):245-256.score: 30.0
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  16. Marco J. Nathan (2012). The Varieties of Molecular Explanation. Philosophy of Science 79 (2):233-254.score: 30.0
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  17. David J. Doukas & Jessica W. Berg (2001). The Family Covenant and Genetic Testing. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):2 – 10.score: 30.0
    The physician-patient relationship has changed over the last several decades, requiring a systematic reevaluation of the competing demands of patients, physicians, and families. In the era of genetic testing, using a model of patient care known as the family covenant may prove effective in accounting for these demands. The family covenant articulates the roles of the physician, patient, and the family prior to genetic testing, as the participants consensually define them. The initial agreement defines the boundaries of autonomy and benefit (...)
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  18. N. M. L. Nathan (2006). Jewish Monotheism and the Christian God. Religious Studies 42 (1):75-85.score: 30.0
    Some Christians combine a doctrine about Christ which implies that there is more than one divine self with the doctrine that God revealed to the Jews a monotheism according to which there is just one divine self. I suggest that it is less costly for such Christians to achieve consistency by abandoning the second of these doctrines than to achieve it by abandoning the first.
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  19. Jonathan Berg (1993). Inferential Roles, Quine, and Mad Holism. In Holism: A Consumer Update. Amsterdam: Rodopi. 283-301.score: 30.0
    Jerry Fodor and Ernie LePore argue against inferential role semantics on the grounds that either it relies on an analytic/synthetic distinction vulnerable to Quinean objections, or else it leads to a variety of meaning holism frought with absurd consequences. However, the slide from semantic atomism to meaning holism might be prevented by distinctions not affected by Quine's arguments against analyticity; and the absurd consequences Fodor and LePore attribute to meaning holism obtain only on an implausible construal of inferential roles.
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  20. N. M. L. Nathan (2010). Exclusion and Sufficient Reason. Philosophy 85 (3):391-397.score: 30.0
    I argue for two principles by combining which we can construct a sound cosmological argument. The first is that for any true proposition p's if 'there is an explanation for p's truth' is consistent then there is an explanation for p's truth. The second is a modified version of the principle that for any class, if there is an explanation for the non-emptiness ofthat class, then there is at least one non-member ofthat class which causes it not to be empty.
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  21. Manfred Berg & Bernd Schäfer (eds.) (2009). Historical Justice in International Perspective: How Societies Are Trying to Right the Wrongs of the Past. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This book makes a valuable contribution to recent debates on redress for historical injustices by offering case studies from nine countries on five continents.
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  22. N. M. L. Nathan (1982). Conscious Belief. Analysis 42 (March):90-93.score: 30.0
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  23. Daniel O. Nathan (1990). Skepticism and Legal Interpretation. Erkenntnis 33 (2):165 - 189.score: 30.0
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  24. J. H. Van Den Berg (1952). The Human Body and the Significance of Human Movement: A Phenomenological Study. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 13 (2):159 - 183.score: 30.0
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  25. Raymond W. Gibbs & Eric A. Berg (1999). Embodied Metaphor in Perceptual Symbols. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):617-618.score: 30.0
    We agree with Barsalou's claim about the importance of perceptual symbols in a theory of abstract concepts. Yet we maintain that the richness of many abstract concepts arises from the metaphorical mapping of recurring patterns of perceptual, embodied experience to provide essential structure to these abstract ideas.
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  26. N. M. L. Nathan (1991). Mctaggart's Immaterialism. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (165):442-456.score: 30.0
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  27. N. M. L. Nathan & Gabriel Uzquiano (2005). Metaphysics. Philosophical Books 46 (3):268-271.score: 30.0
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  28. Jessica Berg (2010). Review of The Ethics of Consent , Eds. Franklin G. Miller and Alan Wertheimer. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):71-72.score: 30.0
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  29. Marco J. Nathan (forthcoming). Causation by Concentration. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axr056.score: 30.0
    This essay is concerned with concentrations of entities, which play an important—albeit often overlooked—role in scientific explanation. First, I discuss an example from molecular biology to show that concentrations can play an irreducible causal role. Second, I provide a preliminary philosophical analysis of this causal role, suggesting some implications for extant theories of causation. I conclude by introducing the concept of causation by concentration, a form of statistical causation whose widespread presence throughout the sciences has been unduly neglected and which (...)
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  30. N. M. L. Nathan (1997). Admiration: A New Obstacle. Philosophy 72 (281):453 - 459.score: 30.0
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  31. Else Margrethe Berg (2009). Clinical Practice: Between Explicit and Tacit Knowledge, Between Dialogue and Technique. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):151-157.score: 30.0
  32. Daniel O. Nathan (1973). Categories and Intentions. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (4):539-541.score: 30.0
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  33. N. M. L. Nathan (1997). Naturalism and Self-Defeat: Plantinga's Version. Religious Studies 33 (2):135-142.score: 30.0
    In "Warrant and Proper Function" Plantinga argues that atheistic Naturalism is self-defeating. What is the probability that our cognitive faculties are reliable, given this Naturalism and an evolutionary explanation of their origins? Plantinga argues that if the Naturalist is modest enough to believe that it is irrational to have any belief as to the value of this probability, then he is irrational even to believe his own Naturalism. I suggest that Plantinga's argument has a false premise, and that even if (...)
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  34. N. M. L. Nathan (2001). Knowledge and its Limits by Timothy Williamson, Oxford University Press, 2000, Pp. XI + 340, £25. Philosophy 76 (3):460-475.score: 30.0
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  35. N. M. L. Nathan (2004). Stoics and Sceptics: A Reply to Brueckner. Analysis 64 (283):264–268.score: 30.0
  36. Jan Berg (1960). A Note on Deontic Logic. Mind 69 (276):566-567.score: 30.0
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  37. Hein Berg (2011). Kant's Conception of Proper Science. Synthese 183 (1):7-26.score: 30.0
    Kant is well known for his restrictive conception of proper science. In the present paper I will try to explain why Kant adopted this conception. I will identify three core conditions which Kant thinks a proper science must satisfy: systematicity, objective grounding, and apodictic certainty. These conditions conform to conditions codified in the Classical Model of Science. Kant’s infamous claim that any proper natural science must be mathematical should be understood on the basis of these conditions. In order to substantiate (...)
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  38. Nicola Berg & Dirk Holtbrügge (2001). Public Affairs Management Activities of German Multinational Corporations in India. Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):105 - 119.score: 30.0
    In this paper the importance of public affairs management in multinational corporations in India will be examined. After briefly discussing the state of the art in international business and society literature, a conceptual framework for public affairs management in multinational corporations will be developed. This framework serves as the theoretical basis for an empirical study among German multinational corporations in India. In the main part of this paper the results of this study will be presented and discussed. The (...)
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  39. Maxwell J. Mehlman & Jessica W. Berg (2008). Human Subjects Protections in Biomedical Enhancement Research: Assessing Risk and Benefit and Obtaining Informed Consent. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):546-549.score: 30.0
  40. Peter Aczel, Benno Berg, Johan Granström & Peter Schuster (2013). Are There Enough Injective Sets? Studia Logica 101 (3):467-482.score: 30.0
    The axiom of choice ensures precisely that, in ZFC, every set is projective: that is, a projective object in the category of sets. In constructive ZF (CZF) the existence of enough projective sets has been discussed as an additional axiom taken from the interpretation of CZF in Martin-Löf’s intuitionistic type theory. On the other hand, every non-empty set is injective in classical ZF, which argument fails to work in CZF. The aim of this paper is to shed some light on (...)
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  41. Steven Berg (1998). Rhetoric, Nature, and Philosophy in Aristophanes' Clouds. Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):1-19.score: 30.0
  42. Jessica W. Berg (2006). Smokescreen. Hastings Center Report 36 (4):C3-C3.score: 30.0
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  43. D. O. Nathan (2005). A Paradox in Intentionalism. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):32-48.score: 30.0
    I argue that intentionalism in aesthetics and in legal interpretation is vulnerable to a different sort of criticism than is found in the voluminous literature on the topic. Specifically, a kind of paradox arises for the intentionalist out of recognition of a second-order intention embedded in the social practices that characterize both art and law. The paper shows how this second-order intention manifests itself in each of the two enterprises, and argues that its presence entails the overriding centrality of the (...)
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  44. N. M. L. Nathan (1975). Compatibilism and Natural Necessity. Mind 84 (April):277-280.score: 30.0
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  45. N. M. L. Nathan (1983). `Egalitarianism'. Mind 92 (367):413-416.score: 30.0
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  46. Russell Berg (2009). Evaluating the Scientificness of Theories. Philosophy Now 74:14-17.score: 30.0
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  47. Daniel O. Nathan (2008). Aesthetic Creationby Zangwill, Nick. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):416-418.score: 30.0
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  48. N. M. L. Nathan (2001). Book Review. The Nature of Perception John Foster. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):455-460.score: 30.0
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  49. N. M. L. Nathan & J. J. Valberg (1982). Necessity, Inconceivability and the "A Priori". Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 56:117 - 155.score: 30.0
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  50. N. M. L. Nathan (2011). Substance Dualism Fortified. Philosophy 86 (2):201-211.score: 30.0
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