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  1. Nathan Kowalsky (2012). Science and Transcendence: Westphal, Derrida, and Responsibility. Zygon 47 (1):118-139.
    Abstract. On the naive reading, “radical social constructivism” would be the result of “deconstructing” science. Science would simply be a contingent construction in accordance with social determinants. However, postmodernism does not necessarily abandon fidelity to the objects of thought. Merold Westphal's Derridean philosophy of religion emphasizes that even theology need not eliminate the transcendence of the divine other. By drawing an analogy between natural and supernatural transcendence, I argue that science is similarly called to responsibility in the encounter with that (...)
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  2. Nathan Kowalsky (ed.) (2010). Hunting--Philosophy for Everyone Taking Aim at the Heart of Life. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  3. Nathan Kowalsky (ed.) (2010). Hunting--Philosophy for Everyone in Search of the Wild Life. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Hunting---Philosophy for Everyone Presents a thought-provoking collection of new essays from across the academic and non-academic spectrum that move far beyound ...
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  4. T. R. Kover & Nathan Kowalsky (2008). On Nature, Human Identity, and Straw Men. Environmental Ethics 30 (4):443-444.
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  5. Nathan Kowalsky (2008). On Nature, Human Identity, and Straw Men. Environmental Ethics 30 (4):443-444.
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  6. Nathan Kowalsky (2007). Wilderness, Wasteland, and Homeland. Ethical Perspectives 14 (4):457-478.
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  7. Nathan Kowalsky (2006). Following Human Nature. Environmental Ethics 28 (2):165-183.
    Any mediation of the humanity-nature divide driven by environmental concern must satisfactorily account for ecologically destructive human behavior. Holmes Rolston, III argues that human cultures should “follow nature” when interacting with nature. Yet he understands culture to necessarily degrade ecosystems, and allows that purely cultural values could legitimate the destruction of nature itself. Edward O. Wilson, meanwhile, argues that culture’s evolutionary function is to fit humanity to its niche; culture necessarily follows “epigenetic rules” naturally selected for this purpose. However, because (...)
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