Search results for 'Nathan Macdonald' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nathan Macdonald (2010). Response to Patrick Madigan, 'the Curse of Monotheism'. Heythrop Journal 51 (6):1075-1077.score: 240.0
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  2. George MacDonald (2009). George MacDonald. The Chesterton Review 35 (1-2):288-289.score: 180.0
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  3. George MacDonald & C. S. Lewis (2006). The Aphorisms of George MacDonald. The Chesterton Review 32 (1/2):187-189.score: 180.0
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  4. Gregory Macdonald (1975). Gregory Macdonald's Reply to Maurice Reckitt. The Chesterton Review 2 (1):120-124.score: 180.0
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  5. Gregory Macdonald (1975). Gregory Macdonald's Reply to Dudley Barker. The Chesterton Review 2 (1):103-106.score: 180.0
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  6. C. J. G. Wright, Barry C. Smith & Cynthia Macdonald (eds.) (2000). Knowing Our Own Minds. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
  7. C. Macdonald, Barry C. Smith & C. J. G. Wright (1998). Knowing Our Own Minds: Essays in Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    Self-knowledge is the focus of considerable attention from philosophers: Knowing Our Own Minds gives a much-needed overview of current work on the subject, bringing together new essays by leading figures. Knowledge of one's own sensations, desires, intentions, thoughts, beliefs, and other attitudes is characteristically different from other kinds of knowledge: it has greater immediacy, authority, and salience. The contributors examine philosophical questions raised by the distinctive character of self-knowledge, relating it to knowledge of other minds, to rationality and agency, externalist (...)
     
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  8. Paul S. MacDonald (ed.) (2001). The Existentialist Reader: An Anthology of Key Texts. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The Existentialist Reader is a comprehensive anthology of classic philosophical writings from eight key existentialist thinkers: Sartre, Camus, Heidegger, de Beauvoir, Jaspers, Marcel, Merleau-Ponty, and Ortega y Gasset. These substantial and carefully selected readings consider the distinctive concerns of existentialism: absurdity, anxiety, alienation, death. A comprehensive introduction by Paul S. MacDonald illuminates the existentialist quest for individual freedom and authentic human experience with insight into the historical and intellectual background of these major figures. The Existentialist Reader is a valuable (...)
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  9. N. M. L. Nathan (2001). The Price of Doubt. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Are any of our beliefs justified? Are they rational? The skeptic thinks that our epistemic justifications are undeserved. Nicholas Nathan confronts the skeptic and questions the value of his argument. Skeptical arguments are against justified and rational belief as well as for ignorance. Nathan argues that the truth value of trivial arguments are a matter of indifference. He tests this conjecture with a varied collection of counterexamples: arguments for ignorance, neo-Cartesian and infinite regress arguments, and also more critically (...)
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  10. N. M. L. Nathan (1980). Evidence and Assurance. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    A systematic study of rational or justified belief, which throws fresh light on current debates about foundations and coherence theories of knowledge, the validation of induction and moral scepticism. Dr Nathan focuses attention on the largely unsatisfiable desires for active and self-conscious assurance of truth liable to be engendered by philosophical reflection about total belief-systems and the sources of knowledge. He extracts a kernel of truth from the doctrine that a regress of justification is both necessary and impossible, contrasts (...)
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  11. N. M. L. Nathan (1992). Will and World. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Beneath metaphysical problems there often lies a conflict between what we want to be true and what we believe to be true. Nathan provides a general account of the resolution of this conflict as a philosophical objective, showing that there are ways of thinking it through systematically with a view to resolving or alleviating it. The author also studies in detail a set of interrelated conflicts about the freedom and the reality of the will. He shows how difficult it (...)
     
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  12. Nathan R. Strunk (2013). Beauty and Being: Thomistic Perspectives. By Piotr Jaroszyñski, Translated by Hugh MacDonald, Pp. 269, Toronto, Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2011, $85.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (6):1085-1086.score: 36.0
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  13. Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (2006). The Metaphysics of Mental Causation. Journal of Philosophy 103 (11):539-576.score: 30.0
    A debate has been raging in the philosophy of mind for at least the past two decades. It concerns whether the mental can make a causal difference to the world. Suppose that I am reading the newspaper and it is getting dark. I switch on the light, and continue with my reading. One explanation of why my switching on of the light occurred is that a desiring with a particular content (that I continue reading), a noticing with a particular content (...)
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  14. Cynthia Macdonald (2004). Mary Meets Molyneux: The Explanatory Gap and the Individuation of Phenomenal Concepts. Noûs 38 (3):503-24.score: 30.0
  15. Scott Macdonald (2008). How Can One Search for God?: The Paradox of Inquiry in Augustine's Confessions. Metaphilosophy 39 (1):20–38.score: 30.0
    The Confessions recounts Augustine's successful search for God. But Augustine worries that one cannot search for God if one does not already know God. That version of the paradox of <span class='Hi'>inquiry</span> dominates and structures Confessions 1–10. I draw connections between the dramatic opening lines of book 1 and the climactic discussion in book 10.26–38 and argue that the latter discussion contains Augustine's resolution of the paradox of <span class='Hi'>inquiry</span> as it applies to the special case of searching for God. (...)
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  16. N. M. L. Nathan (2005). Direct Realism: Proximate Causation and the Missing Object. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 20 (36):3-6.score: 30.0
    Direct Realists believe that perception involves direct awareness of an object not dependent for its existence on the perceiver. Howard Robinson rejects this doctrine in favour of a Sense-Datum theory of perception. His argument against Direct Realism invokes the principle ‘same proximate cause, same immediate effect’. Since there are cases in which direct awareness has the same proximate cerebral cause as awareness of a sense datum, the Direct Realist is, he thinks, obliged to deny this causal principle. I suggest that (...)
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  17. Cynthia Macdonald (1998). Self-Knowledge and the "Inner Eye&Quot;. Philosophical Explorations 1 (2):83-106.score: 30.0
    What is knowledge of one's own current, consciously entertained intentional states a form of inner awareness? If so, what form? In this paper I explore the prospects for a quasi-observational account of a certain class of cases where subjects appear to have self-knowledge, namely, the so-called cogito-like cases. In section one I provide a rationale for the claim that we need an epistemology of self-knowledge, and specifically, an epistemology of the cogito-like cases. In section two I argue that contentful properties (...)
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  18. Cynthia Macdonald & Graham F. Macdonald (1995). How to Be Psychologically Relevant. In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Philosophy of Psychology: Debates on Psychological Explanation. Blackwell.score: 30.0
    How did I raise my arm? The simple answer is that I raised it as a consequence of intending to raise it. A slightly more complicated response would mention the absence of any factors which would inhibit the execution of the intention- and a more complicated one still would specify the intention in terms of a goal (say, drinking a beer) which requires arm-raising as a means towards that end. Whatever the complications, the simple answer appears to be on the (...)
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  19. James E. Macdonald & Caryn L. Beck-Dudley (1994). Are Deontology and Teleology Mutually Exclusive? Journal of Business Ethics 13 (8):615 - 623.score: 30.0
    Current discussions of business ethics usually only consider deontological and utilitarian approaches. What is missing is a discussion of traditional teleology, often referred to as virtue ethics. While deontology and teleology are useful, they both suffer insufficiencies. Traditional teleology, while deontological in many respects, does not object to utilitarian style calculations as long as they are contained within a moral framework that is not utilitarian in its origin. It contains the best of both approaches and can be used to focus (...)
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  20. Cynthia Macdonald (2007). Introspection and Authoritative Self-Knowledge. Erkenntnis 67 (2):355 - 372.score: 30.0
    In this paper I outline and defend an introspectionist account of authoritative self-knowledge for a certain class of cases, ones in which a subject is both thinking and thinking about a current, conscious thought. My account is distinctive in a number of ways, one of which is that it is compatible with the truth of externalism.
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  21. Cynthia Macdonald (1999). Shoemaker on Self-Knowledge and Inner Sense. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):711-38.score: 30.0
    What is introspective knowledge of one's own intentional states like? This paper aims to make plausible the view that certain cases of self-knowledge, namely the cogito-type ones, are enough like perception to count as cases of quasi-observation. To this end it considers the highly influential arguments developed by Sydney Shoemaker in his recent Royce Lectures. These present the most formidable challenge to the view that certain cases of self-knowledge are quasi-observational and so deserve detailed examination. Shoemaker's arguments are directed against (...)
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  22. D. Macdonald (1953). A Theory of Mass Culture. Diogenes 1 (3):1-17.score: 30.0
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  23. Scott MacDonald (1992). Goodness as Transcendental: The Early Thirteenth-Century Recovery of an Aristotelian Idea. Topoi 11 (2):173-186.score: 30.0
    In this paper I investigate the philosophical developments at the heart of what appears to be the earliest systematic formulation of the doctrine of the transcendentals by comparing the first questions of Philip the Chancellor''sSumma de bono (the so-called first treatise on the transcendentals — ca. 1230) with its immediate ancestor, a small group of questions from William of Auxerre''sSumma aurea (ca. 1220). I argue that Philip''s innovative position on the relation between being and goodness, the centerpiece of his doctrine (...)
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  24. Graham Macdonald & Cynthia Macdonald (eds.) (2010). Emergence in Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The volume also extends the debate about emergence by considering the independence of chemical properties from physical properties, and investigating what would ...
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  25. Cynthia Macdonald (1989). Mind-Body Identity Theories. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Chapter One The most plausible arguments for the identity of mind and body that have been advanced in this century have been for the identity of mental ...
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  26. Cynthia Macdonald (2004). Self-Knowledge and the First Person. In M. Sie, Marc Slors & B. Van den Brink (eds.), Reasons of One's Own. Ashgate.score: 30.0
    It is a familiar view in the philosophy of mind and action is that for a thought or attitude to constitute a reason for an action is for it to render intelligible, in the light of norms of rationality or reason, that action. However, I can make sense of your actions in this way by crediting you with attitudes that I myself do not hold. Equally, you can do this for my actions. So not all reasons for one’s actions are (...)
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  27. Margaret Macdonald (1951). Professor Ryle on the Concept of Mind. Philosophical Review 60 (January):80-90.score: 30.0
  28. Graham Macdonald & David Papineau (eds.) (2006). Teleosemantics: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 30.0
    Teleosemantics seeks to explain meaning and other intentional phenomena in terms of their function in the life of the species. This volume of new essays from an impressive line-up of well-known contributors offers a valuable summary of the current state of the teleosemantics debate.
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  29. Marc Slors & Cynthia Macdonald (2008). Rethinking Folk-Psychology: Alternatives to Theories of Mind. Philosophical Explorations 11 (3):153 – 161.score: 30.0
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  30. Daniel O. Nathan (1982). Irony and the Artist's Intentions. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (3):245-256.score: 30.0
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  31. William Fish & Cynthia Macdonald (2009). The Identity Theory of Truth and the Realm of Reference: Where Dodd Goes Wrong. Analysis 69 (2):297-304.score: 30.0
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  32. Cynthia Macdonald (2008). Consciousness, Self-Consciousness, and Authoritative Self-Knowledge. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):319-346.score: 30.0
    Many recent discussions of self-consciousness and self-knowledge assume that there are only two kinds of accounts available to be taken on the relation between the so-called first-order (conscious) states and subjects' awareness or knowledge of them: a same-order, or reflexive view, on the one hand, or a higher-order one, on the other. I maintain that there is a third kind of view that is distinctively different from these two options. The view is important because it can accommodate and make intelligible (...)
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  33. Paul Macdonald (2007). Recent Thomistic Epistemology and Philosophy of Religion. Philosophy Compass 2 (3):517–533.score: 30.0
    The purpose of this article is to show the contribution of recent Thomistic epistemology - that is, an epistemology rooted in the philosophical theology of Thomas Aquinas - makes to contemporary philosophy of religion. In particular, I show how recent philosophers and theologians (most of them of a distinctly analytic persuasion) are appropriating insights in Aquinas’s philosophical theology in order to address perennial epistemological issues: most broadly, how it is that human persons know the world as well as the divine. (...)
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  34. Scott MacDonald (1991). Ultimate Ends in Practical Reasoning: Aquinas's Aristotelian Moral Psychology and Anscombe's Fallacy. Philosophical Review 100 (1):31-66.score: 30.0
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  35. Iain Macdonald (2011). 'What Is, Is More Than It Is': Adorno and Heidegger on the Priority of Possibility. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (1):31-57.score: 30.0
    (2011). ‘What Is, Is More than It Is’: Adorno and Heidegger on the Priority of Possibility. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 19, No. 1, pp. 31-57. doi: 10.1080/09672559.2011.539357.
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  36. Chris MacDonald, Michael McDonald & Wayne Norman (2002). Charitable Conflicts of Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):67 - 74.score: 30.0
    This paper looks at conflicts of interest in the not-for-profit sector. It examines the nature of conflicts of interest and why they are of ethical concern, and then focuses on the way not-for-profit organisations are especially prone to and vulnerable to conflict-of-interest scandals. Conflicts of interest corrode trust; and stakeholder trust (particularly from donors) is the lifeblood of most charities. We focus on some specific challenges faced by charitable organisations providing funding for scientific (usually medical) research, and examine a case (...)
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  37. Crispin Wright, Barry C. Smith & Cynthia Macdonald (eds.) (1998). Knowing Our Own Minds. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Knowledge of one's own sensations, desires, intentions, thoughts, beliefs, and other attitudes is characteristically different from other kinds of knowledge: it has greater immediacy, authority, and salience. This volume offers a powerful and comprehensive look at current work on this topic, featuring closely interlinked essays by leading figures in the field that examine philosophical questions raised by the distinctive character of self-knowledge, relating it to knowledge of other minds, to rationality and agency, externalist theories of psychological content, and knowledge of (...)
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  38. William Fish & Cynthia Macdonald (2011). McDowell's Alternative Conceptions of the World. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (1):87-94.score: 30.0
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  39. Graham Macdonald & David Papineau (2006). Introduction: Prospects and Problems for Teleosemantics. In Graham Macdonald & David Papineau (eds.), Teleosemantics: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
  40. Graham Macdonald (2007). Emergence and Causal Powers. Erkenntnis 67 (2):239 - 253.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that the non-reductive monist need not be concerned about the ‘problem’ of mental causation; one can accept both the irreducibility of mental properties to physical properties and the causal closure of the physical. More precisely, it is argued that instances of mental properties can be causally efficacious, and that there is no special barrier to seeing mental properties whose instances are causally efficacious as being causally relevant to the effects they help to bring about. It is then (...)
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  41. Paul S. MacDonald (2001). Current Approaches to Phenomenology. Inquiry 44 (1):101-124.score: 30.0
  42. Paul A. Macdonald (2005). A Realist Epistemology of Faith. Religious Studies 41 (4):373-393.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I analyse and interpret Thomas Aquinas's account of faith in order to show how Thomistic faith is a veridical cognitive state that directs the mind to God, and consequently constitutes a distinct form of knowledge of God. By assenting to the revealed propositions of faith (which express the truth about God), and thereby forming true beliefs about God under the authority and guidance of God's grace, the possessor of faith comes to know or apprehend truly something about (...)
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  43. Cynthia Macdonald & Graham F. Macdonald (1986). Mental Causes and Explanation of Action. Philosophical Quarterly 36 (April):145-58.score: 30.0
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  44. Philip Catton & Graham Macdonald (eds.) (2004). Karl Popper: Critical Appraisals. Routledge.score: 30.0
    One of the most original thinkers of the century, Karl Popper's work has inspired generations of philosophers, historians, and politicians. This collection of papers, specially written for this volume, offers fresh philosophical examination of key themes in Popper's philosophy, including philosophy of knowledge, science and political philosophy. Drawing from some of Popper's most important works, contributors address Popper's solution to the problem of induction, his views on conventionalism and criticism in an open society and explore his unique position in twentieth (...)
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  45. Cynthia Macdonald (1995). Externalism and First-Person Authority. Synthese 104 (1):99-122.score: 30.0
    Externalism in the philosophy of mind is threatened by the view that subjects are authoritative with regard to the contents of their own intentional states. If externalism is to be reconciled with first-person authority, two issues need to be addressed: (a) how the non-evidence-based character of knowledge of one's own intentional states is compatible with ignorance of the empirical factors that individuate the contents of those states, and (b) how, given externalism, the non-evidence-based character of such knowledge could place its (...)
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  46. Chris MacDonald & Bryn Williams-Jones (2002). Ethics and Genetics: Susceptibility Testing in the Workplace. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):235 - 241.score: 30.0
    Genetic testing in the workplace is a technology both full of promise and fraught with ethical peril. Though not yet common, it is likely to become increasingly so. We survey the key arguments in favour of such testing, along with the most significant ethical worries. We further propose a set of pragmatic criteria, which, if met, would make it permissible for employers to offer (but not to require) workplace genetic testing.
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  47. Graham F. Macdonald (1999). Folk-Psychology, Psychopathology, and the Unconscious. Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):206-224.score: 30.0
    There is a 'philosophers' assumption that there is a problem with the very notion of an unconscious mental state.The paper begins by outlining how the problem is generated, and proceeds to argue that certain conditions need to be fulfilled if the unconscious is to qualify as mental. An explanation is required as to why we would ever expect these conditions to be fulfilled, and it is suggested that the Freudian concept of repression has an essential role to play in such (...)
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  48. Kate Macdonald & Terry Macdonald (2010). Democracy in a Pluralist Global Order: Corporate Power and Stakeholder Representation. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (1):19-43.score: 30.0
    Whereas representative democratic mechanisms have generally been built around preexisting institutional structures of sovereign states, the global political domain lacks any firmly constitutionalized or sovereign structures that could constitute an analogous institutional backbone within a democratic global order. Instead, global public power can best be characterized as "pluralist" in structure. Some recent commentators have argued that if global democratization is to succeed at all, it must proceed along a trajectory beginning with the construction of global sovereign institutions and culminating in (...)
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  49. Scott MacDonald (2008). Foundations in Aquinas's Ethics. Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):350-367.score: 30.0
    Aquinas argues that practical reasoning requires foundations: first practical principles (ultimate ends) grasped by us per se from which deliberation proceeds. Contrary to the thesis of an important paper of Terence Irwin's, I deny that Aquinas advances two inconsistent conceptions of the scope of deliberation and, correspondingly, two inconsistent accounts of the content of the first practical principles presupposed by deliberation. On my account, Aquinas consistently takes first practical principles to be highly abstract, general, or formal ends, ends subject to (...)
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  50. Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.) (1995). Connectionism: Debates on Psychological Explanation. Blackwell.score: 30.0
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