Search results for 'Natural Language' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  96
    Axel Gelfert (2015). Inner Speech, Natural Language, and the Modularity of the Mind. Kairos 14:7-29.
    Inner speech is a pervasive feature of our conscious mental lives. Yet its function and character remain an issue of philosophical debate. The present paper focuses on the relation between inner speech and natural language and on the cognitive functions that various contributors have ascribed to inner speech. In particular, it is argued that inner speech does not consist of bare, context-free internal presentations of sentential (or subsentential) content, but rather has an ineliminably perspectival element. The proposed model (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1990). Natural Language and Natural Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-27.
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   209 citations  
  3.  59
    Nissim Francez & Roy Dyckhoff (2010). Proof-Theoretic Semantics for a Natural Language Fragment. Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (6):447-477.
    The paper presents a proof-theoretic semantics (PTS) for a fragment of natural language, providing an alternative to the traditional model-theoretic (Montagovian) semantics (MTS), whereby meanings are truth-condition (in arbitrary models). Instead, meanings are taken as derivability-conditions in a dedicated natural-deduction (ND) proof-system. This semantics is effective (algorithmically decidable), adhering to the meaning as use paradigm, not suffering from several of the criticisms formulated by philosophers of language against MTS as a theory of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  4.  10
    Johan van Benthem (2014). Natural Language and Logic of Agency. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 23 (3):367-382.
    This light piece reflects on analogies between two often disjoint streams of research: the logical semantics and pragmatics of natural language and dynamic logics of general information-driven agency. The two areas show significant overlap in themes and tools, and yet, the focus seems subtly different in each, defying a simple comparison. We discuss some unusual questions that emerge when the two are put side by side, without any pretense at covering the whole literature or at reaching (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  5
    Stergios Chatzikyriakidis & Zhaohui Luo (2014). Natural Language Inference in Coq. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 23 (4):441-480.
    In this paper we propose a way to deal with natural language inference by implementing Modern Type Theoretical Semantics in the proof assistant Coq. The paper is a first attempt to deal with NLI and natural language reasoning in general by using the proof assistant technology. Valid NLIs are treated as theorems and as such the adequacy of our account is tested by trying to prove them. We use Luo’s Modern Type Theory with coercive subtyping as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  16
    Miklós Erdélyi-Szabó, László Kálmán & Agi Kurucz (2008). Towards a Natural Language Semantics Without Functors and Operands. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (1):1-17.
    The paper sets out to offer an alternative to the function/argument approach to the most essential aspects of natural language meanings. That is, we question the assumption that semantic completeness (of, e.g., propositions) or incompleteness (of, e.g., predicates) exactly replicate the corresponding grammatical concepts (of, e.g., sentences and verbs, respectively). We argue that even if one gives up this assumption, it is still possible to keep the compositionality of the semantic interpretation of simple predicate/argument structures. In our opinion, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Laureano Luna (2013). Indefinite Extensibility in Natural Language. The Monist 96 (2):295-308.
    The Monist’s call for papers for this issue ended: “if formalism is true, then it must be possible in principle to mechanize meaning in a conscious thinking and language-using machine; if intentionalism is true, no such project is intelligible”. We use the Grelling-Nelson paradox to show that natural language is indefinitely extensible, which has two important consequences: it cannot be formalized and model theoretic semantics, standard for formal languages, is not suitable for it. We (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  94
    John-Michael Kuczynski (2010). Boguslawski's Analysis of Quantification in Natural Language. Journal of Pragmatics 42 (10):2836-2844.
    The semantic rules governing natural language quantifiers (e.g. "all," "some," "most") neither coincide with nor resemble the semantic rules governing the analogues of those expressions that occur in the artificial languages used by semanticists. Some semanticists, e.g. Peter Strawson, have put forth data-consistent hypotheses as to the identities of the semantic rules governing some natural-language quantifiers. But, despite their obvious merits, those hypotheses have been universally rejected. In this paper, it is shown that those hypotheses are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  4
    Lea Frermann & Mirella Lapata (2015). Incremental Bayesian Category Learning From Natural Language. Cognitive Science 40 (1).
    Models of category learning have been extensively studied in cognitive science and primarily tested on perceptual abstractions or artificial stimuli. In this paper, we focus on categories acquired from natural language stimuli, that is, words. We present a Bayesian model that, unlike previous work, learns both categories and their features in a single process. We model category induction as two interrelated subproblems: the acquisition of features that discriminate among categories, and the grouping of concepts into categories based on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Jonathan Knowles (1998). The Language of Thought and Natural Language Understanding. Analysis 58 (4):264-272.
    Stephen Laurence and Eric Margolis have recently argued that certain kinds of regress arguments against the language of thought (LOT) hypothesis as an account of how we understand natural languages have been answered incorrectly or inadequately by supporters of LOT ('Regress arguments against the language of thought', Analysis, 57 (1), 60-6, J 97). They argue further that this does not undermine the LOT hypothesis, since the main sources of support for LOT are (or might be) independent of (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Michael Glanzberg (2015). Logical Consequence and Natural Language. In Colin Caret & Ole Hjortland (eds.), Foundations of Logical Consequence. Oxford University Press 71-120.
    One of the great successes in the study of language has been the application of formal methods, including those of formal logic. Even so, this chapter argues against one way of accounting for this success, by arguing that the study of natural language semantics and of logical consequence relations are not the same. There is indeed a lot we can glean about logic from looking at our languages, and at our inferential practices, but the semantic properties (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  35
    Adam Morton (1982). Formal Semantics of Natural Language. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 12 (4):805-808.
    a review of Keenan, ed. *Formal Semantics of Natural Language*.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  26
    Chris Fox & Shalom Lappin (2004). An Expressive First-Order Logic with Flexible Typing for Natural Language Semantics. Logic Journal of the Interest Group in Pure and Applied Logics 12 (2):135--168.
    We present Property Theory with Curry Typing (PTCT), an intensional first-order logic for natural language semantics. PTCT permits fine-grained specifications of meaning. It also supports polymorphic types and separation types. We develop an intensional number theory within PTCT in order to represent proportional generalized quantifiers like “most.” We use the type system and our treatment of generalized quantifiers in natural language to construct a type-theoretic approach to pronominal anaphora that avoids some of the difficulties that undermine (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  1
    Tim Fernando (forthcoming). Prior and Temporal Sequences for Natural Language. Synthese:1-13.
    Logics of discrete time are, in Arthur Prior’s words, “applicable in limited fields of discourse in which we are concerned with what happens in a sequence of discrete states,” independent of “any serious metaphysical assumption that time is discrete.” This insight is applied to natural language semantics, a widespread assumption in which is that time is, as is the real line, dense. “Limited fields of discourse” are construed as finite sets of temporal propositions, inducing bounded notions of temporal (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  25
    Lucja Iwańska (1993). Logical Reasoning in Natural Language: It is All About Knowledge. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 3 (4):475-510.
    A formal, computational, semantically clean representation of natural language is presented. This representation captures the fact that logical inferences in natural language crucially depend on the semantic relation of entailment between sentential constituents such as determiner, noun, adjective, adverb, preposition, and verb phrases.The representation parallels natural language in that it accounts for human intuition about entailment of sentences, it preserves its structure, it reflects the semantics of different syntactic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  17
    Syed S. Ali & Stuart C. Shapiro (1993). Natural Language Processing Using a Propositional Semantic Network with Structured Variables. Minds and Machines 3 (4):421-451.
    We describe a knowledge representation and inference formalism, based on an intensional propositional semantic network, in which variables are structures terms consisting of quantifier, type, and other information. This has three important consequences for natural language processing. First, this leads to an extended, more natural formalism whose use and representations are consistent with the use of variables in natural language in two ways: the structure of representations mirrors the structure of the language and allows (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  14
    Bernardo Magnini, Elena Not, Oliviero Stock & Carlo Strapparava (2000). Natural Language Processing for Transparent Communication Between Public Administration and Citizens. Artificial Intelligence and Law 8 (1):1-34.
    This paper presents two projects concerned with the application of natural language processing technology for improving communication between Public Administration and citizens. The first project, GIST,is concerned with automatic multilingual generation of instructional texts for form-filling. The second project, TAMIC, aims at providing an interface for interactive access to information, centered on natural language processing and supposed to be used by the clerk but with the active participation of the citizen.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  2
    Inger Lytje (1989). Natural Language Understanding Within a Cognitive Semantics Framework. AI and Society 4 (4):276-290.
    The article argues that cognitive linguistic theory may prove an alternative to the Montague paradigm for designing natural language understanding systems. Within this framework it describes a system which models language understanding as a dialogical process between user and computer. The system operates with natural language texts as input and represent language meaning as entity-relationship diagrams.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Geoffrey K. Pullum (1987). Natural Language Interfaces and Strategic Computing. AI and Society 1 (1):47-58.
    Modern weaponry is often too complex for unaided human operation, and is largely or totally controlled by computers. But modern software, particularly artificial intelligence software, exhibits such complexity and inscrutability that there are grave dangers associated with its use in non-benign applications. Recent efforts to make computer systems more accessible to military personnel through natural language processing systems, as proposed in the Strategic Computing Initiative of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, increases rather than decreases the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Alice G. B. ter Meulen (1997). Representing Time in Natural Language the Dynamic Interpretation of Tense and Aspect. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   42 citations  
  21. Jay L. Garfield (ed.) (1987). Modularity in Knowledge Representation and Natural-Language Understanding. MIT Press.
  22.  62
    Fred Sommers, Natural Language and Everyday Reasoning.
  23.  57
    John Haugeland (1979). Understanding Natural Language. Journal of Philosophy 76 (November):619-32.
  24.  3
    Jack A. Adams, Howard I. Thorsheim & John S. McIntyre (1969). Item Length, Acoustic Similarity, and Natural Language Mediation as Variables in Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):39.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  30
    Larry Hauser (1995). Natural Language and Thought: Doing Without Mentalese. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (2):41-47.
    Hauser defends the proposition that our languages of thought are public languages. One group of arguments points to the coincidence of clearly productive (novel, unbounded) cognitive competence with overt possession of recursive symbol systems. Another group relies on phenomenological experience. A third group cites practical and methodological considerations: Occam's razor and the "streetlight principle" (other things being equal, look under the lamp) that motivate looking for instantiations of outer languages in thought first.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  1
    William E. Montague, Jack A. Adams & Harold O. Kiess (1966). Forgetting and Natural Language Mediation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):829.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  1
    Harold O. Kiess (1968). Effects of Natural Language Mediators on Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (1):7.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  11
    James Franklin & S. W. K. Chan (1998). Symbolic Connectionism in Natural Language Disambiguation. IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks 9:739-755.
    Uses connectionism (neural networks) to extract the "gist" of a story in order to represent a context going forward for the disambiguation of incoming words as a text is processed.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Barbara Abbott (1995). Natural Language and Thought: Thinking in English. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (2):49-55.
  30. Veronica Dahl & Patrick Saint-Dizier (1988). Natural Language Understanding and Logic Programming, Ii Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Natural Language Understanding and Logic Programming, Vancouver, Canada, 17-19 August, 1987. [REVIEW] Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  7
    Michael Levison (2012). The Semantic Representation of Natural Language. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Introduction -- Basic concepts -- Previous approaches -- Semantic expressions: introduction -- Formal issues -- Semantic expressions: basic features -- Advanced features -- Applications: capture -- Three little pigs -- Applications: creation.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. André Thayse & Jean-Louis Binot (1991). From Natural Language Processing to Logic for Expert Systems a Logic Based Approach to Artificial Intelligence.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Clinton B. Walker, William E. Montague & Alexander J. Wearing (1970). Natural Language Associability in Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):264.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  35
    Hao Tang (2015). A Meeting of the Conceptual and the Natural: Wittgenstein on Learning a Sensation‐Language. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (1):105-135.
    Since the rise of modern natural science there has been deep tension between the conceptual and the natural. Wittgenstein's discussion of how we learn a sensation-language contains important resources that can help us relieve this tension. The key here, I propose, is to focus our attention on animal nature, conceived as partially re-enchanted. To see how nature, so conceived, helps us relieve the tension in question, it is crucial to gain a firm and detailed appreciation of how (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35. Chris Barker & Chung-Chieh Shan (2014). Continuations and Natural Language. OUP Oxford.
    This book takes concepts developed by researchers in theoretical computer science and adapts and applies them to the study of natural language meaning. Summarizing over a decade of research, Chris Barker and Chung-chieh Shan put forward the Continuation Hypothesis: that the meaning of a natural language expression can depend on its own continuation.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36.  37
    Sebastian Löbner (2000). Polarity in Natural Language: Predication, Quantification and Negation in Particular and Characterizing Sentences. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (3):213-308.
    The present paper is an attempt at the investigation of the nature of polarity contrast in natural languages. Truth conditions for natural language sentences are incomplete unless they include a proper definition of the conditions under which they are false. It is argued that the tertium non datur principle of classical bivalent logical systems is empirically invalid for natural languages: falsity cannot be equated with non-truth. Lacking a direct intuition about the conditions under which a sentence (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  37.  13
    Anton Sukhoverkhov (2012). Natural Signs and the Origin of Language. Biosemiotics 5 (2):153-159.
    This article considers natural signs and their role in the origin of language. Natural signs, sometimes called primary signs, are connected with their signified by causal relationships, concomitance, or likeliness. And their acquisition is directed by both objective reality and past experience (memory). The discovery and use of natural signs is a required prerequisite of existence for any living systems because they are indispensable to movement, the search for food, regulation, communication, and many other information-related activities. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  66
    Jaakko Hintikka (2002). Negation in Logic and in Natural Language. Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5-6):585-600.
    In game-theoretical semantics, perfectlyclassical rules yield a strong negation thatviolates tertium non datur when informationalindependence is allowed. Contradictorynegation can be introduced only by a metalogicalstipulation, not by game rules. Accordingly, it mayoccur (without further stipulations) onlysentence-initially. The resulting logic (extendedindependence-friendly logic) explains several regularitiesin natural languages, e.g., why contradictory negation is abarrier to anaphase. In natural language, contradictory negationsometimes occurs nevertheless witin the scope of aquantifier. Such sentences require a secondary interpretationresembling the so-called substitutionalinterpretation of quantifiers.This interpretation (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Friederike Moltmann (2013). Abstract Objects and the Semantics of Natural Language. Oxford University Press.
    This book pursues the question of how and whether natural language allows for reference to abstract objects in a fully systematic way. By making full use of contemporary linguistic semantics, it presents a much greater range of linguistic generalizations than has previously been taken into consideration in philosophical discussions, and it argues for an ontological picture is very different from that generally taken for granted by philosophers and semanticists alike. Reference to abstract objects such as properties, numbers, propositions, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  40.  21
    Michael Mccord & Arendse Bernth (2005). A Metalogical Theory of Natural Language Semantics. Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (1):73 - 116.
    We develop a framework for natural language semantics which handles intensionality via metalogical constructions and deals with degree truth values in an integrated way. We take an axiomatic set theory, ZF, as the foundation for semantic representations, but we make ZF a metalanguage for part of itself by embedding a language ℒ within ZF which is basically a copy of the part of ZF consisting of set expressions. This metalogical set-up is used for handling propositional attitude verbs (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  19
    M. Dolores Jiménez López (2006). A Grammar Systems Approach to Natural Language Grammar. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (4):419 - 454.
    Taking as its starting point significant similarities between a formal language model—Grammar Systems—and a grammatical theory—Autolexical Syntax—in this paper we suggest the application of the former to the topic of the latter. To show the applicability of Grammar Systems Theory to grammatical description, we introduce a formal-language-theoretic framework for the architecture of natural language grammar: Linguistic Grammar Systems. We prove the adequacy of this model by highlighting its features (modularity, parallelism, interaction) and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  49
    Brian Rabern (forthcoming). The History of the Use of ⟦.⟧-Notation in Natural Language Semantics. Semantics and Pragmatics.
    In contemporary natural languages semantics one will often see the use of special brackets to enclose a linguistic expression, e.g. ⟦carrot⟧. These brackets---so-called denotation brackets or semantic evaluation brackets---stand for a function that maps a linguistic expression to its "denotation" or semantic value (perhaps relative to a model or other parameters). Even though this notation has been used in one form or another since the early development of natural language semantics in the 1960s and 1970s, (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Angelika Kratzer, Situations in Natural Language Semantics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Situation semantics was developed as an alternative to possible worlds semantics. In situation semantics, linguistic expressions are evaluated with respect to partial, rather than complete, worlds. There is no consensus about what situations are, just as there is no consensus about what possible worlds or events are. According to some, situations are structured entities consisting of relations and individuals standing in those relations. According to others, situations are particulars. In spite of unresolved foundational issues, the partiality provided by situation semantics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  44.  41
    Jakub Szymanik (2009). Quantifiers in TIME and SPACE. Computational Complexity of Generalized Quantifiers in Natural Language. Dissertation, University of Amsterdam
    In the dissertation we study the complexity of generalized quantifiers in natural language. Our perspective is interdisciplinary: we combine philosophical insights with theoretical computer science, experimental cognitive science and linguistic theories. -/- In Chapter 1 we argue for identifying a part of meaning, the so-called referential meaning (model-checking), with algorithms. Moreover, we discuss the influence of computational complexity theory on cognitive tasks. We give some arguments to treat as cognitively tractable only those problems which can be computed (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  45.  74
    Keith Frankish (1998). Natural Language and Virtual Belief. In Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.), Language and Thought: Interdisciplinary Themes. Cambridge University Press 248.
    This chapter outlines a new argument for the view that language has a cognitive role. I suggest that humans exhibit two distinct kinds of belief state, one passively formed, the other actively formed. I argue that actively formed beliefs (_virtual beliefs_, as I call them) can be identified with _premising policies_, and that forming them typically involves certain linguistic operations. I conclude that natural language has at least a limited cognitive role in the formation and manipulation of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  46. R. Blutner (2000). Some Aspects of Optimality in Natural Language Interpretation. Journal of Semantics 17 (3):189-216.
    In a series of papers, Petra Hendriks, Helen de Hoop, and Henriette de Swart have applied optimality theory (OT) to semantics. These authors argue that there is a fundamental difference between the from of OT as used in syntax on the one hand and its from as used in semantics on the other hand. Whereas in the first case. OT takes the point of view of the speaker, in the second case the point of view of the hearer is taken. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  47.  34
    Eugen Fischer (1997). On the Very Idea of a Theory of Meaning for a Natural Language. Synthese 111 (1):1-8.
    A certain orthodoxy has it that understanding is essentially computational: that information about what a sentence means is something that may be generated by means of a derivational process from information about the significance of the sentences constituent parts and of the ways in which they are put together. And that it is therefore fruitful to study formal theories acceptable as compositional theories of meaning for natural languages: theories that deliver for each sentence of their object-language a theorem (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Friederike Moltmann (2013). Reference to Numbers in Natural Language. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):499 - 536.
    A common view is that natural language treats numbers as abstract objects, with expressions like the number of planets, eight, as well as the number eight acting as referential terms referring to numbers. In this paper I will argue that this view about reference to numbers in natural language is fundamentally mistaken. A more thorough look at natural language reveals a very different view of the ontological status of natural numbers. On this (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  49.  40
    Jakub Szymanik (2010). Computational Complexity of Polyadic Lifts of Generalized Quantifiers in Natural Language. Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (3):215-250.
    We study the computational complexity of polyadic quantifiers in natural language. This type of quantification is widely used in formal semantics to model the meaning of multi-quantifier sentences. First, we show that the standard constructions that turn simple determiners into complex quantifiers, namely Boolean operations, iteration, cumulation, and resumption, are tractable. Then, we provide an insight into branching operation yielding intractable natural language multi-quantifier expressions. Next, we focus on a linguistic case study. We use computational (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  50.  11
    Kiyomi Kusumoto (2005). On the Quantification Over Times in Natural Language. Natural Language Semantics 13 (4):317-357.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000