Search results for 'Natural Method' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  16
    Sara T. Scharf (2009). Identification Keys, the "Natural Method," and the Development of Plant Identification Manuals. Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):73 - 117.
    The origins of field guides and other plant identification manuals have been poorly understood until now because little attention has been paid to 18th century botanical identification guides. Identification manuals came to have the format we continue to use today when botanical instructors in post-Revolutionary France combined identification keys (step-wise analyses focusing on distinctions between plants) with the "natural method" (clustering of similar plants, allowing for identification by gestalt) and alphabetical indexes. Botanical works featuring multiple but (...)
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  2.  47
    Kenneth J. Sufka & Derek D. Turner (2005). An Evolutionary Account of Chronic Pain: Integrating the Natural Method in Evolutionary Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):243-257.
    This paper offers an evolutionary account of chronic pain. Chronic pain is a maladaptive by-product of pain mechanisms and neural plasticity, both of which are highly adaptive. This account shows how evolutionary psychology can be integrated with Flanagan's natural method, and in a way that avoids the usual charges of panglossian adaptationism and an uncritical commitment to a modular picture of the mind. Evolutionary psychology is most promising when it adopts a bottom-up research (...)
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  3.  32
    Owen J. Flanagan (1995). Consciousness and the Natural Method. Neuropsychologia 33:1103-15.
  4. Rebecca Copenhaver & Brian P. A. Copenhaver (2012). 9. A Natural Method. In Rebecca Copenhaver & Brian P. A. Copenhaver (eds.), From Kant to Croce: Modern Philosophy in Italy 1800-1950. University of Toronto Press 45-47.
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  5.  3
    Henry Wingate (2013). The Natural Method of Teaching Latin: Its Origins, Rationale, and Prospects. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 106 (3):493-504.
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  6. Sara T. Scharf (2009). Identification Keys, the “Natural Method,” and the Development of Plant Identification Manuals. Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):73-117.
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  7.  68
    Martha I. Gibson (2011). A Revolution in Method, Kant's “Copernican Hypothesis”, and the Necessity of Natural Laws. Kant-Studien 102 (1):1-21.
    In an effort to account for our a priori knowledge of synthetic necessary truths, Kant proposes to extend the successful method used in mathematics and the natural sciences to metaphysics. In this paper, a uniform account of that method is proposed and the particular contribution of the ‘Copernican hypothesis’ to our knowledge of necessary truths is explained. It is argued that, though the necessity of the truths is in a way owing to the object's relation to our (...)
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  8.  22
    Richard W. Miller (1987). Fact and Method: Explanation, Confirmation and Reality in the Natural and the Social Sciences. Princeton University Press.
    In this bold work of broad scope and rich erudition, Richard W. Miller sets out to reorient the philosophy of science.
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  9.  3
    Gideon Freudenthal (1981). Adam Smith's Analytic-Synthetic Method and the ‘System of Natural Liberty’. History of European Ideas 2 (2):135-154.
    In the present paper I shall deal with Adam Smith's application of the analytic-synthetic method, which he considered to be the scientific method par excellence. I shall concentrate on some shortcomings in Smith's arguments and endeavour to explain them as resulting from a particular interpretation of the aforesaid method. The peculiarity of Smith's interpretation was that he omitted the analysis and that he thought the synthesis reflects the composition of an object out of pre-existing (...)
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  10. Peter R. Anstey (2003). Locke on Method in Natural Philosophy. In The Philosophy of John Locke: New Perspectives. Routledge 26--42.
  11.  10
    Wm Forbes Cooley (1924). Scientific Method: An Inquiry Into the Character and Validity of Natural Laws. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 21 (13):352-357.
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  12.  9
    Michael Ruse (1974). The Triumph of the Darwinian Method by M. T, Ghiselin; Charles Darwin: The Years of Controversy by P. Vorzimmer; Wallace and Natural Selection by H. Lewis McKinney. [REVIEW] History of Science 12:43-58.
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  13.  4
    Douglas Jesseph (1996). Hobbes and the Method of Natural Science. In Tom Sorell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hobbes. Cambridge University Press 86--107.
  14.  53
    Joseph Becker (1993). The Essential Nature of the Method of the Natural Sciences: Response to A. T. Nuyen's "Truth, Method, and Objectivity: Husserl and Gadamer on Scientific Method". Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):73-76.
  15.  1
    A. D. Ritchie (2001). Scientific Method: An Inquiry Into the Character and Validity of Natural Laws. Routledge.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  16.  9
    F. Rapp (1972). Weltanschauung and Method. Philosophical Essays on the Unity of the Natural and Social Sciences. Philosophy and History 5 (1):23-24.
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  17.  1
    K. D. Knorr-Cetina (1981). Social and Scientific Method or What Do We Make of the Distinction Between the Natural and the Social Sciences? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 11 (3):335-359.
  18.  1
    Peter Machamer (2000). The Concept of the Individual an D the Idea (L) of Method in Seventeenth-Century Natural Philosophy. In Peter K. Machamer, Marcello Pera & Aristeidēs Baltas (eds.), Scientific Controversies: Philosophical and Historical Perspectives. Oxford University Press 81.
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  19.  4
    C. Joachim Classen (1976). Science and Method. On Aristotle's Theory of Natural Science. Philosophy and History 9 (2):155-157.
  20.  5
    Niccolò Guicciardini (2013). Harper and Ducheyne on Newton William L. Harper,Isaac Newton's Scientific Method, Turning Data Into Evidence About Gravity & Cosmology, Oxford University Press, 2011 Steffen Ducheyne,The Main Business of Natural Philosophy, Isaac Newton's Natural-Philosophical Methodology, Springer, 2102. Perspectives on Science 21 (4):463-481.
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  21.  4
    Louis A. Perrott (1979). Lived Aspects of Natural Scientific Method. Duquesne Studies in Phenomenological Psychology 3:97-110.
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  22.  10
    Richmond Campbell (1990). Book Review:Fact and Method: Explanation, Confirmation, and Reality in the Natural and Social Sciences. Richard W. Miller. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (4):897-.
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  23.  1
    Abner Shimony (1995). Search for a Naturalistic Worldview. Vol. 1, Scientific Method and Epistemology; Vol. 2, Natural Science and Metaphysics. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 104 (2):311-314.
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  24.  1
    Gert H. Muller (1960). Review: Karel Louis de Bouvere, A Method in Proofs of Undefinability, with Applications to Functions in the Arithmetic of Natural Numbers. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 25 (3):271-273.
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  25.  1
    Sandra B. Rosenthal (1997). Scientific Method and Natural Attunement: The Illuminating Alliance of Dewey and Buddhism. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 11 (4):239 - 246.
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  26. G. Ambrosetti (1971). Christian Natural Law the Spirit and Method Of. American Journal of Jurisprudence 16 (1):290-301.
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  27. Ronald Curtis (1993). The Essential Nature of the Method of the Natural Sciences: Response to A T Nuyen's Truth, Method, and Objectivity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):73-76.
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  28. Ae Miller & Mg Miller (1994). Metaphysical Construction: The Central Method of the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 159:62-97.
     
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  29. A. D. Ritchie (2010). Scientific Method: An Inquiry Into the Character and Validity of Natural Laws. Routledge.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  30. A. D. Ritchie (2014). Scientific Method: An Inquiry Into the Character and Validity of Natural Laws. Routledge.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  31. Joseph Rouse (1989). RICHARD W. MILLER, "Fact and Method: Explanation, Confirmation and Reality in the Natural and the Social Sciences". [REVIEW] History and Theory 28 (1):125.
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  32. Warren Schmaus (1988). Fact and Method: Explanation, Confirmation, and Reality in the Natural and Social Sciences by Richard W. Miller. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 79:492-493.
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  33. S. Shah (2014). Natural Environmental Responsibility in Indian Corporations: A Mixed-Method Study. Journal of Human Values 20 (2):129-151.
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  34. Hyman Stock (1931). The Method of Descartes in the Natural Sciences. Jamaica, the Marion Press.
     
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  35. Y. C. Zark (1996). Hobbes and the Method of Natural Science. In Tom Sorell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hobbes. Cambridge University Press
     
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  36.  47
    Aspasia S. Moue, Kyriakos A. Masavetas & Haido Karayianni (2006). Tracing the Development of Thought Experiments in the Philosophy of Natural Sciences. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 37 (1):61 - 75.
    An overview is provided of how the concept of the thought experiment has developed and changed for the natural sciences in the course of the 20th century. First, we discuss the existing definitions of the term 'thought experiment' and the origin of the thought experimentation method, identifying it in Greek Presocratics epoch. Second, only in the end of the 19th century showed up the first systematic enquiry on thought experiments by Ernst Mach's work. After the Mach's (...)
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  37.  5
    Daniel Schwartz (2014). Is Baconian Natural History Theory-Laden? Journal of Early Modern Studies 3 (1).
    The recent surge of interest in Bacon's own attempts at natural history has revealed a complex interplay with his speculative ideas in natural philosophy. This research has given rise to the concern that his natural histories are theory-laden in a way that Bacon ought to find unacceptable, given his prescription in the Parasceve for a reliable body of factual instances that can be used as a storehouse for induction. This paper aims to resolve this tension (...)
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  38.  6
    Maria Paula Diogo, Ana Carneiro & Ana Simões (2001). The Portuguese Naturalist Correia da Serra (1751-1823) and His Impact on Early Nineteenth-Century Botany. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (2):353 - 393.
    This paper focuses on the contributions to natural history, particularly in methods of plant classification of the Portuguese botanist, man of letters, diplomat, and Freemason Abbé José Correia da Serra (1751-1823), placing them in their national and international political and social contexts. Correia da Serra adopted the natural method of classification championed by the Frenchman Antoine-Laurent de Jussieu, and introduced refinements of his own that owe much to parallel developments in zoology. He endorsed the (...)
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  39. Nicholas Maxwell (forthcoming). Popper's Paradoxical Pursuit of Natural Philosophy. In J. Shearmur & G. Stokes (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Popper. Cambridge University Press
    Philosophy of science is seen by most as a meta-discipline – one that takes science as its subject matter, and seeks to acquire knowledge and understanding about science without in any way affecting, or contributing to, science itself. Karl Popper’s approach is very different. His first love is natural philosophy or, as he would put it, cosmology. This intermingles cosmology and the rest of natural science with epistemology, methodology and metaphysics. Paradoxically, however, one of his best (...)
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  40.  23
    Eileen Crist (1998). The Ethological Constitution of Animals as Natural Objects: The Technical Writings of Konrad Lorenz and Nikolaas Tinbergen. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 13 (1):61-102.
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  41.  4
    Franco Todescan (2007). 'Sequuntur Dogmatica De Iure Praedae' Law and Theology in Grotius's Use of Sources in De Iure Praedae. Grotiana 26 (1):281-309.
    This contribution aims at reconstructing the system of legal sources as it can be recognised in all its clarity in the De iure praedae. After pointing out that Grotius applied in this work the mathematical method, it is observed that the law has a clear voluntaristic character: 'voluntas universorum ad universos directa lex dicitur'. Even the 'first notion', quoted in Regula I, that is the lex aeterna, has this specific character: 'Quod Deus se velle significarit, id ius est'. (...)
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  42.  56
    René Jagnow (2015). Can We See Natural Kind Properties? Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 44 (2):183-205.
    Which properties can we visually experience? Some authors hold that we can experience only low-level properties such as color, illumination, shape, spatial location, and motion. Others believe that we can also experience high-level properties, such as being a dog or being a pine tree. On the basis of her method of phenomenal contrast, Susanna Siegel has recently defended the latter view. One of her central claims is that we can best account for certain phenomenal contrasts if we assume (...)
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  43.  21
    Jonathan Y. Tsou (forthcoming). Natural Kinds, Psychiatric Classification, and the History of the DSM. History of Psychiatry.
    This paper addresses philosophical issues concerning whether mental disorders are natural kinds and how the DSM should classify mental disorders. I argue that some mental disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, depression) are natural kinds in the sense that they are natural classes constituted by a set of stable biological mechanisms. I subsequently argue that a theoretical and causal approach to classification would provide a superior method for classifying natural kinds than the purely descriptive approach (...)
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  44.  48
    Joachim Horvath (2016). Conceptual Analysis and Natural Kinds: The Case of Knowledge. Synthese 193 (1):167-184.
    There is a line of reasoning in metaepistemology that is congenial to naturalism and hard to resist, yet ultimately misguided: that knowledge might be a natural kind, and that this would undermine the use of conceptual analysis in the theory of knowledge. In this paper, I first bring out various problems with Hilary Kornblith’s argument from the causal–explanatory indispensability of knowledge to the natural kindhood of knowledge. I then criticize the argument from the natural kindhood of knowledge (...)
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  45.  18
    Nissim Francez (2014). Harmony in Multiple-Conclusion Natural-Deduction. Logica Universalis 8 (2):215-259.
    The paper studies the extension of harmony and stability, major themes in proof-theoretic semantics, from single-conclusion natural-deduction systems to multiple-conclusions natural-deduction, independently of classical logic. An extension of the method of obtaining harmoniously-induced general elimination rules from given introduction rules is suggested, taking into account sub-structurality. Finally, the reductions and expansions of the multiple-conclusions natural-deduction representation of classical logic are formulated.
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  46.  53
    Marion Godman (2013). Psychiatric Disorders Qua Natural Kinds: The Case of the “Apathetic Children”. Biological Theory 7 (2):144-152.
    In this article I examine some of the issues involved in taking psychiatric disorders as natural kinds. I begin by introducing a permissive model of natural kind-hood that at least prima facie seems to allow psychiatric disorders to be natural kinds. The model, however, hinges on there in principle being some grounding that is shared by all members of a kind, which explain all or most of the additional shared projectible properties. This leads us (...)
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  47.  9
    Lea Frermann & Mirella Lapata (2015). Incremental Bayesian Category Learning From Natural Language. Cognitive Science 40 (3):n/a-n/a.
    Models of category learning have been extensively studied in cognitive science and primarily tested on perceptual abstractions or artificial stimuli. In this paper, we focus on categories acquired from natural language stimuli, that is, words. We present a Bayesian model that, unlike previous work, learns both categories and their features in a single process. We model category induction as two interrelated subproblems: the acquisition of features that discriminate among categories, and the grouping of concepts into categories based on (...)
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  48.  20
    Peter Anstey & Michael Hunter (2008). Robert Boyle's 'Designe About Natural History'. Early Science and Medicine 13 (2):83-126.
    This paper provides an analysis of Robert Boyle's most detailed discussion of the Baconian method of natural history. In a long letter to Henry Oldenburg dated 13 June 1666 and in ancillary manuscript material, Boyle spells out the method or 'Designe' by which he believes experimental programs in natural philosophy should be written up. The 'Designe' is enormously important in giving a clear statement of the precise contours of Boyle's Baconian methodology and (...)
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  49.  62
    Helen Thornton (2005). State of Nature or Eden?: Thomas Hobbes and His Contemporaries on the Natural Condition of Human Beings. University of Rochester Press.
    State of nature or Eden? -- Hobbes' state of nature as an account of the fall? -- Hobbes' own belief or unbelief -- The contemporary reaction to Leviathan -- Hobbes and commentaries on Genesis -- A note on method and chapter order -- Good and evil -- Hobbes on good and evil -- The 'seditious doctrines' of the schoolmen -- The contemporary reaction -- The scriptural account -- The state of nature as an account of the fall? -- (...)
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  50.  29
    Celina A. Lértora Mendoza (2007). Averroes y Tomás de Aquino sobre el concepto de ciencia natural. Veritas: Revista de Filosofia da PUCRS 52 (3).
    At the beginning of the Book 1 of the Physica, Aristotle sets the question on the matter and subject of natural science. This issue refers to the concept of the science, which he starts bringing up. Natural Science (philosophia naturalis) has, since then, been especially enquired into, above all in terms of the original Aristotle’s commentary. Averroes dedicates a concise and, at the same time comprehensive Proem on the subject. Thomas Aquinas, on the contrary, and in (...)
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