Search results for 'Natural theology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  19
    Avoidance of Natural Theology (2013). A Perspective on Natural Theology From Continental Philosophy. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up
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  2.  13
    of Natural Theology (2013). Postmodernism and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up
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  3.  10
    Guy Bennett-Hunter (2013). Natural Theology and Literature. In Russell Re Manning John Hedley Brooke & Fraser Watts (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford University Press
    In this chapter, I hope to show, by referring to two specific literary examples, that works of literature can demonstrate the possibility of Natural Theology and can prompt their readers’ thinking along Natural Theological lines by allowing them to have experiences which mirror the structure of those dealt with by Natural Theology.
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  4. Helen De Cruz & Johan De Smedt (2015). A Natural History of Natural Theology. The Cognitive Science of Theology and Philosophy of Religion. MIT Press.
    [from the publisher's website] Questions about the existence and attributes of God form the subject matter of natural theology, which seeks to gain knowledge of the divine by relying on reason and experience of the world. Arguments in natural theology rely largely on intuitions and inferences that seem natural to us, occurring spontaneously—at the sight of a beautiful landscape, perhaps, or in wonderment at the complexity of the cosmos—even to a nonphilosopher. In this book, Helen (...)
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  5. Norman Kretzmann (1999). The Metaphysics of Creation: Aquinas's Natural Theology in Summa Contra Gentiles Ii. Clarendon Press.
    Norman Kretzmann expounds and criticizes Aquinas's theology of creation, which is `natural' in that Aquinas developed it without depending on the data of Scripture. Because of the special importance of intellective creatures like us, Aquinas's account of the divine origin and organization of the universe includes essential ingredients of his philosophy of mind. The Metaphysics of Creation is a continuation of the project Kretzmann began in The Metaphysics of Theism; as before, he not only explains Aquinas's natural (...)
     
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  6.  4
    Brandon L. Rickabaugh & Derek L. McAllister (forthcoming). Who You Could Have Known: Divine Hiddenness, Epistemic Counterfactuals, and the Recalcitrant Nature of Natural Theology. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-12.
    We argue there is a deep conflict in Paul Moser’s work on divine hiddenness. Moser’s treatment of DH adopts a thesis we call SEEK: DH often results from failing to seek God on His terms. One way in which people err, according to Moser, is by trusting arguments of traditional natural theology to lead to filial knowledge of God. We argue that Moser’s SEEK thesis commits him to the counterfactual ACCESS: had the atheist sought after God in harmony (...)
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  7.  15
    John Angus Campbell (1994). Of Orchids, Insects, and Natural Theology: Timing, Tactics, and Cultural Critique in Darwin's Post-?Origin? Strategy. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (1):63-80.
    This essay examines the relation of Darwin's orchids book to a central persuasive flaw in theOrigin: Its inability to give variation sufficient “presence” to break the hold of “design” in the mind of the reader. Darwin characterized the orchids book as “a flank movement on the enemy”; this essay identifies the “enemy” as Paley's natural theology and the “flank” as thetopoi, maxims, and habits of perception that led Darwin's colleagues and contemporaries to see design in nature. Moreover, this (...)
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  8.  96
    Owen Anderson (2008). The Presuppositions of Religious Pluralism and the Need for Natural Theology. Sophia 47 (2):201-222.
    In ‘The Presuppositions of Religious Pluralism and the Need for Natural Theology’ I argue that there are four important presuppositions behind John Hick’s form of religious pluralism that successfully support it against what I call fideistic exclusivism. These are i) the ought/can principle, ii) the universality of religious experience, iii) the universality of redemptive change, and iv) a view of how God (the Eternal) would do things. I then argue that if these are more fully developed they support (...)
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  9.  45
    Lloyd P. Gerson (1990). God and Greek Philosophy: Studies in the Early History of Natural Theology. Routledge.
    THE PRE-SOCRATIC ORIGINS OF NATURAL THEOLOGY § INTRODUCTION St Augustine informs us that pagan philosophers divided theology into three parts: () civic ...
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  10.  4
    Michael M. Waddell (2004). Natural Theology in St. Thomas's Early Doctrine of Truth. Sapientia 59 (215):5-21.
    The role of natural theology in St. Thomas Aquinas's early doctrine of (transcendental) trut, especially in question one of Aquinas's "Disputed Questions on Truth (De veritate).
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  11.  24
    Glenn Branch (2009). Review of William Paley, Natural Theology , Edited with an Introduction and Notes by Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (1):99-101.
    Matthew D. Eddy and David Knight’s new edition of William Paley’s Natural Theology deserves to become the standard scholarly edition of what is a historically, theologically, and philosophically important work, despite a certain neglect of philosophical issues on the part of the editors.
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  12.  4
    Graham Oppy (2007). Natural Theology. In Deane-Peter Baker (ed.), Alvin Plantinga. Cambridge University Press 15-47.
    This paper is a careful examination of the various approaches that Alvin Plantinga has taken towards natural theology over the course of his academic career (from *God and Other Minds* to *Warranted Christian Belief*).
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  13.  4
    Stephen M. Contakes & Christopher Kyle (2011). Josiah Parsons Cooke Jr.: Epistemology in the Service of Science, Pedagogy, and Natural Theology. Hyle 17 (1):1 - 23.
    Josiah Parsons Cooke established chemistry education at Harvard University, initiated an atomic weight research program, and broadly impacted American chemical education through his students, the introduction of laboratory instruction, textbooks, and influence on Harvard's admissions requirements. The devoutly Unitarian Cooke also articulated and defended a biogeochemical natural theology, which he defended by arguing for commonalities between the epistemologies of science and religion. Cooke's pre-Mendeleev classification scheme for the elements and atomic weight research were motivated by his interest in (...)
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  14. Courtney Fugate, John Hymers, Johann August Eberhard & Immanuel Kant (2016). Preparation for Natural Theology: With Kant’s Notes and the Danzig Rational Theology Transcript. Bloomsbury.
    Designed as a textbook for use in courses on natural theology and used by Immanuel Kant as the basis for his Lectures on The Philosophical Doctrine of Religion, Johan August Eberhard's Preparation for Natural Theology (1781) is now available in English for the first time. -/- With a strong focus on the various intellectual debates and historically significant texts in late renaissance and early modern theology, Preparation for Natural Theology influenced the way Kant (...)
     
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  15. Philippe Gagnon (2012). Raymond Ruyer, la Biologie Et la Théologie Naturelle [Raymond Ruyer, Biology, and Natural Theology]. In Ronny Desmet & Michel Weber (eds.), Chromatikon VIII: Annales de la philosophie en procès — Yearbook of Philosophy in Process. Éditions Chromatika
    This is the outline: Introduction : le praticien d’une science-philosophie; Épiphénoménisme retourné et subjectivité délocalisée; Dieu est-il jamais inféré par la science ?; La question du panthéisme; Le pilotage axiologique et la parabole mécaniste; L'unité domaniale comme ce qui reste en dehors de la science.
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  16. Yingjin Xu (2011). What Does Fodor's “Anti-Darwinism” Mean to Natural Theology? Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (3):465-479.
    In the current dialogue of “science and religion,” it is widely assumed that the thoughts of Darwinists and that of atheists overlap. However, Jerry Fodor, a full-fledged atheist, recently announced a war against Darwinism with his atheistic campaign. Prima facie, this “civil war” might offer a chance for theists: If Fodor is right, Darwinistic atheism will lose the cover of Darwinism and become less tenable. This paper provides a more pessimistic evaluation of the situation by explaining the following: Fodor’s criticism (...)
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  17.  59
    Massimiliano Badino, Physical Order Vs. Divine Designer: Celestial Mechanics and Natural Theology Struggling for the System of the World.
  18.  28
    Alberto Frigo (2011). The Evidence of the Hidden God. Pascal's Critique of Natural Theology. Rivista di Filosofia 102 (2):193-216.
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  19. John B. [from old catalog] Cobb (1966). A Christian Natural Theology. London, Lutterworth P..
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  20. John B. Cobb (1965). A Christian Natural Theology, Based on the Thought of Alfred North Whitehead. Philadelphia, Westminster Press.
     
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  21.  11
    David Ray Griffin (2013). Process Thought and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up
    Process thought refers to the mode of thinking rooted in the philosophies of Alfred North Whitehead and Charles Hartshorne. Drawing heavily on Whitehead and Hartshorne, this chapter presents an account of process natural theology. The discussions cover the decline of natural theology's reputation in modern times; process theology in the broad sense; panexperientialism's avoidance of materialism's mind–body problems; sensationism's knowledge problems; how prehensive perception solves sensationism's knowledge problems; and process theology in the narrow sense.
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  22.  10
    Michael Ruse (2013). Natural Theology: The Biological Sciences. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 397.
    This chapter demonstrates the significance of the biological sciences in natural theology. It does so by considering three major topics: the argument from design, the problem of evil, and the place of humans in the cosmic scheme of things. In the light of modern biology, specifically modern Darwinian evolutionary theory, there is little support for definitive proofs of the nature and existence of the Christian God. However, notwithstanding arguments to the contrary, there is nothing in modern Darwinian evolutionary (...)
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  23.  8
    Mark Wynn (2013). Religious Experience and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 325.
    This chapter begins with a review of recent philosophical literature on religious experience, which has generally been concerned with experiences that focus on God or some other supernatural ‘thing’, and then considers other kinds of religious experience which should be of some interest for natural theology. It suggests that these kinds of religious experience invite a certain conception of God, namely, as an overarching meaning, rather than as a supernatural ‘object’, and also a correlative epistemology, one which gives (...)
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  24.  8
    Russell Re Manning (2013). Protestant Perspectives on Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up
    This chapter examines the simultaneous rejection and endorsement of natural theology within Protestantism, focusing on two contentious issues representing the tensions within Protestant perspectives on natural theology. Firstly, it considers the historical theological question of the attitude to natural theology amongst the Reformers and the post-Reformation Protestant Orthodoxy. The chapter engages with the established consensus that the increasingly positive evaluation of the possibility and value of natural theology within Protestant Orthodoxy represents a (...)
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  25.  7
    Robert G. Morrison (2013). Islamic Perspectives on Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 151.
    This chapter examines various Islamic perspectives on natural theology, and briefly outlines the reasons why the philosophy of Ibn Rusdh does not represent a definition of natural theology in Islam. It then discusses varieties of natural theology and Islam; Kalām texts and revelation; al-Ghazālī's criticism of philosophers; Nizām al-Dīn al-Nīsābūrī's views on the reasoned study of nature; natural theology and religious obligations; Sharī'a and natural law; and reactions to Darwin in the (...)
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  26.  7
    Keith M. Parsons (2013). Perspectives on Natural Theology From Analytic Philosophy. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 247.
    This chapter begins by defining natural theology in analytical philosophy, and next considers analytical philosophers's rejection of natural theology and the rise of analytical theism. The focus then turns to one of the most prominent arguments debated in recent discussions of natural theology, the so-called fine-tuning argument. The FTA is a sophisticated version of the traditional argument to design, one that appeals to the apparent ‘fine tuning’ of the fundamental constants of nature, such as (...)
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  27.  6
    Christopher C. Knight (2013). Natural Theology and the Eastern Orthodox Tradition. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 213.
    This chapter examines Eastern Orthodox perspectives on natural theology. The discussions cover the classical roots Orthodox understanding of knowledge of God; worship and eschatology; creation and the limits of natural theology; panentheism and the structure of theophany; and science and theology in Orthodoxy.
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  28.  6
    Alexander W. Hall (2013). Natural Theology in the Middle Ages. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 350--57.
    The development of natural theology in the Middle Ages was driven by the rebirth experienced by Western Europe beginning in the 1000s owing to the emergence of stable monarchies and reconquest of the Iberian Peninsula. This expansion gave scholars access to the vast libraries of scientific and philosophical literature held in Arabic cultural centres – libraries that contained Aristotelian works on natural, ethical, and metaphysical sciences, which had for centuries been lost to the Latin West. The new (...)
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  29.  6
    Andrew Moore (2013). Theological Critiques of Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 227.
    This chapter analyzes what is often regarded as the locus classicus of modern theological disputes about natural theology: the 1934 debate between Karl Barth and Emil Brunner published as Natural Theology: Comprising ‘Nature and Grace’ by Professor Dr Emil Brunner and the reply ‘No!’ by Dr Karl Barth. One of the most striking things about the debate is that, although Barth is rightly regarded as opposing natural theology, Brunner repeatedly draws attention to his agreement (...)
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  30.  6
    Wayne Hankey (2013). Natural Theology in the Patristic Period. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 38.
    This chapter considers the different forms of natural theology in the Patristic Period, first examining the Stoic Middle Platonism of Philo Judaeus and Josephus. In Philo – uniting Plato's and Moses' genesis, and thus connecting God, the cosmos, and the human in the opposite way to the one taken by Lucretius in his De Rerum Natura – we encounter most of the forms natural theology took in the period. We find not only that there is no (...)
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  31.  3
    Matthew D. Eddy (2013). Nineteenth-Century Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 100.
    In the nineteenth century, natural theology was ‘natural’ because the evidence was taken from direct observation of the natural world, or from observations made in the increasingly specialised settings of science. It was ‘theological’ because such evidence was interpreted in light of the attributes of God laid out in the Bible and in Christian doctrine. However, the extent to which the evidence of revelation was augmented or superseded by the facts provided by reason varied between authors. (...)
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  32.  2
    William Wallace & Edward Caird (1900). Lectures and Essays on Natural Theology and Ethics. Philosophical Review 9 (2):188-193.
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  33.  5
    David Knight (2013). Chemical Sciences and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 434.
    This chapter discusses chemistry's connection to natural theology, tracing the history of chemistry from its origins in alchemy to developments in the twentieth century. Alchemists sought to ape and speed up God's creation, but were concerned about whether artificial gold would be the same as natural gold. Modern chemists too, as they sought to improve the world through their syntheses of dyes, vitamins, and textiles, have been taxed with producing poor substitutes for the natural and the (...)
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  34.  5
    Christopher Southgate (2013). Natural Theology and Ecology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 459.
    This chapter discusses the type of natural theology appropriate to the reading of ecosystems, and gives a number of examples of such an approach. It begins by discussing the impact of Darwinism and the possibilities for a natural theology of the biosphere, and then presents the author's own approach to a theological reading the ecological world. The approach involves stressing the integrity of the scientific account, and hence the ambiguity of ecosystems; taking seriously the few scriptural (...)
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  35.  5
    Charles Taliaferro (2013). Philosophical Critique of Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 385.
    This chapter discusses the two kinds of philosophical critiques of natural theology: external and internal critiques. External critiques take aim at the whole project, objecting to the metaphysics, epistemology, or theory of values that make natural theology possible at all. Internal critiques allow that natural theology can succeed but none of its arguments are cogent or meet high philosophical standards. Among external critiques, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason seeks to undermine all metaphysics, as do (...)
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  36.  3
    X. U. Yingjin (2011). What Does Fodor's “Anti-Darwinism” Mean to Natural Theology? Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (3):465-479.
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  37.  4
    William Schweiker (2013). Morality and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 310.
    In many cultures and societies, there has been, at least intuitively, some connection between what is believed to be sacred and divine and the highest ideals of the good, justice, and the right. Moral beliefs and values are often sensed to have ultimate importance, as somehow holy, and thus the examination of those beliefs, values, and sensibilities would be a proper starting point for natural theology. The inverse is also true: reflection on and the experience of evil and (...)
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  38.  2
    Fraser Watts (2013). Natural Theology and the Mind Sciences. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 475.
    This chapter, which discusses how the mind sciences can be used in natural theology, identifies two aspects of human mental functioning to consider from a theological point of view. First, there is the theological significance of the general capacity for advanced mental functioning found in humans. Second, there is the theological significance of particular human capacities such as religion.
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  39.  3
    Paul Ewart (2013). The Physical Sciences and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 419.
    This chapter demonstrates how natural theology is both encouraged and challenged by the findings of the physical sciences. The scientific method is committed to finding naturalistic explanations, yet the vision that it gives suggests there is more to it than meets this particular eye: the universe seems to be permeated with signs of ‘mind’. The mysterious quantum world has shown us that new ways of thinking are required to deal with material ‘reality’. Quantum theory has also revealed new (...)
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  40. James Mccosh (1871). Christianity and Positivism a Series of Lectures to the Times on Natural Theology and Apologetics. R. Carter and Brothers.
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  41.  3
    Neil A. Manson (2013). The Design Argument and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 295.
    In the broadest sense, natural theology is the effort to gain knowledge of God from non-revealed sources – that is, from sources other than scripture and religious experience – but there is also a much narrower sense of natural theology: the construction of arguments for the existence of God from empirical evidence. This narrower sense is most strongly associated with the argument for God's existence from the appearance that the natural world has been constructed for (...)
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  42.  2
    Iohn Polkinghorne (2013). Mathematics and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 449.
    This chapter discusses the significance of mathematics in natural theology. It suggests that the existence of an independent noetic realm of mathematics should encourage an openness to the possibility of further metaphysical riches to be explored. Engagement with mathematics is only a part of our mental experience. In itself it can give just a hint of what might be meant by the spiritual. The realm of the divine is yet more distant still, but just as arithmetic may have (...)
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  43.  2
    Rodney D. Holder (2013). Natural Theology in the Twentieth Century. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 118.
    This chapter examines Karl Barth's denouncement of natural theology and the reactions of the group of theologians following him. These theologians have all engaged with the natural sciences, but also share similar concerns to Barth in terms of prioritising revelation and of maintaining or defending an orthodox theology. Dietrich Bonhoeffer offered opportunities for intellectual engagement with the world through his notion of the penultimate and in other ways. Wolfhart Pannenberg brought scientific rationality to bear directly on (...)
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  44.  1
    Iessica Frazier (2013). Natural Theology in Eastern Religions. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 166.
    This chapter examines natural theology perspectives from Eastern religions. It begins by exploring the possibility of a broader definition of ‘natural theology’ that encompasses the various forms it takes outside the Abrahamic religions. The chapter then considers the ways in which Eastern natural theologies can offer answers to Western questions, by focusing on Hindu approaches to the causal argument. Hindu conceptions of the divine provide a glimpse of what the options would be if the West (...)
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  45. Alfred Barry & Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Britain) (1877). What is Natural Theology? An Attempt to Estimate the Cumulative Evidence of Many Witnesses to God. Christian Evidence Committee of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
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  46. Thomas Gornall (1962). A Philosophy of God, the Elements of Thomist Natural Theology. New York, Sheed and Ward.
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  47. Immanuel Kant (1926). Prize Essay on Natural Theology and Morals.
  48. Stuart Peterfreund (2012). Turning Points in Natural Theology From Bacon to Darwin: The Way of the Argument From Design. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  49. R. Webster (1972). New Dialogue with Anglo-American Philosophy the Problem of Being, Rational Thought and Natural Theology. Officium Libri Catholici.
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  50.  2
    Christopher Rowland (2013). Natural Theology and the Christian Bible. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up 23.
    This chapter first considers what the biblical writers say about nature and God's relationship to it, and then looks at the function of nature and the natural world in the Bible, and their peculiar role in apprehending the divine. It examines the early Christian conviction about the way that God ‘spoke’ through a human being, and is believed to be present in particular patterns of human relating. In the process of interpretation, we can discern the way in which nascent (...)
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