Search results for 'Nature (Aesthetics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mary A. Vance (1979). Books on Landscape and Nature Aesthetics: A Selected Bibliography. Vance Bibliographies.
     
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  2. Mary A. Vance (1986). Landscape and Nature Aesthetics: Monographs (a Revision of a 56). Vance Bibliographies.
     
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  3. Malcolm Budd (2002). The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature: Essays on the Aesthetics of Nature. Oxford University Press.
    The aesthetics of nature has over the last few decades become an intense focus of philosophical reflection, as it has been ever more widely recognised that it is not a mere appendage to the aesthetics of art. Everyone delights in the beauty of flowers, and some are thrilled by the immensity of mountains or of the night sky. But what is involved in serious aesthetic appreciation of the natural world? Malcolm Budd presents four interlinked studies in the aesthetics of (...)
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  4.  73
    Allen Carlson (2009). Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics. Columbia University Press.
    The development and nature of environmental aesthetics -- Aesthetic appreciation and the natural environment -- The requirements for an adequate aesthetics of nature -- Aesthetic appreciation and the human environment -- Appreciation of the human environment under different conceptions -- Aesthetic appreciation and the agricultural landscape -- What is the correct way to aesthetically appreciate landscapes?
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  5.  2
    Yi-fu Tuan (1993). Passing Strange and Wonderful: Aesthetics, Nature, and Culture. Kodansha International.
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  6.  30
    Nathaniel Barrett (2011). Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (Eds): Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (6):659-668.
    Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (eds): Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9258-2 Authors Nathaniel Barrett, Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion 1711 Massachusetts Ave NW #308 Washington DC 20036 USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  7.  41
    Paul Shepard (1991). Man in the Landscape: A Historic View of the Esthetics of Nature. University of Georgia Press.
    "Man in the Landscape" was among the first books of a new genre that has elucidated the ideas, beliefs, and images that lie behind our modern destruction and ...
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  8.  9
    Lorenzo Bartalesi & Mariagrazia Portera (2015). Beyond the Nature-Culture Dichotomy: A Proposal for Evolutionary Aesthetics. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):101-111.
    Human aesthetic preferences towards a certain landscape type, a certain bodily traits of the opposite sex, a figurative style rather than another, are embedded in what we call “aesthetic experience”, a complex network of instinctive reactions, emotions, feelings, thoughts, and judgements. Are these preferences universal and species-specific, that is to say are they the same for every member of a particular species? Evolutionary psychologists advocate the universality and species-specificity of the aesthetic preferences. Going back to Darwin's writings, in particular to (...)
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  9.  97
    Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (2013). Delighting in Natural Beauty: Joint Attention and the Phenomenology of Nature Aesthetics. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (4):167-186.
    Empirical research in the psychology of nature appreciation suggests that humans across cultures tend to evaluate nature in positive aesthetic terms, including a sense of beauty and awe. They also frequently engage in joint attention with other persons, whereby they are jointly aware of sharing attention to the same event or object. This paper examines how, from a natural theological perspective, delight in natural beauty can be conceptualized as a way of joining attention to creation. Drawing on an (...)
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  10. Asghar Talaye Minai (1993). Aesthetics, Mind, and Nature: A Communication Approach to the Unity of Matter and Consciousness. Praeger.
     
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  11.  19
    Erman Kaplama (2016). Kantian and Nietzschean Aesthetics of Human Nature: A Comparison Between the Beautiful/Sublime and Apollonian/Dionysian Dualities. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):166-217.
    Both for Kant and for Nietzsche, aesthetics must not be considered as a systematic science based merely on logical premises but rather as a set of intuitively attained artistic ideas that constitute or reconstitute the sensible perceptions and supersensible representations into a new whole. Kantian and Nietzschean aesthetics are both aiming to see beyond the forms of objects to provide explanations for the nobility and sublimity of human art and life. We can safely say that Kant and Nietzsche used the (...)
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  12.  16
    Christopher Stevens (2011). Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism. [REVIEW] Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):251 - 257.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 251-257, June 2011.
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  13.  11
    Antony Fredriksson (2011). Environmental Aesthetics Beyond the Dialectics of Interest and Disinterest Deconstructing the Myth of Pristine Nature. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 22 (40-41).
    In this paper I want to scrutinize one of the key ideas within modern Western aesthetics. Beauty is often considered to derive from a virtuous disinterested attitude towards nature. This kind of view has been advocated by thinkers such as Shaftesbury and Kant in the beginning of the so-called aesthetic turn in philosophy. The problem with this view is that it presupposes that nature exists by itself before human intervention in a kind of ideal pristine state. My hypothesis (...)
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  14. Allen Carlson (1999). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art, and Architecture. Routledge.
    Aesthetics and the Environment presents fresh and fascinating insights into our interpretation of the environment. Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, but Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature--in our response to sunsets, mountains or horizons or more mundane surroundings, like gardens or the view from our window. Carlson argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience and (...)
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  15.  18
    Anton Killin (2013). The Arts and Human Nature: Evolutionary Aesthetics and the Evolutionary Status of Art Behaviours. Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):703-718.
    This essay reviews one of the most recent books in a trend of new publications proffering evolutionary theorising about aesthetics and the arts—themes within an increasing literature on aspects of human life and human nature in terms of evolutionary theory. Stephen Davies’ The Artful Species links some of our aesthetic sensibilities with our evolved human nature and critically surveys the interdisciplinary debate regarding the evolutionary status of the arts. Davies’ engaging and accessible writing succeeds in demonstrating the maturity (...)
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  16.  4
    Allen Carlson & Sheila Lintott (eds.) (2008). Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. Columbia University Press.
    The essays in the final section explicitly bring together aesthetics, ethics, and environmentalism to explore the ways in which each might affect the others.
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  17.  22
    Keping Wang (2007). Appreciating Nature in View of Practical Aesthetics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (1):140-149.
    Appreciating nature may at its best feature have three levels of experience according to practical aesthetics. The first level is more sensuous as it largely pleases the ear and eye, the second level is more psychological as it chiefly pleases the mind and mood, and the third level is more sublimate as it mainly pleases the will and spirit. In Chinese culture the affinity between man and nature can be traced back to the traditional conception of tian ren (...)
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  18.  44
    Glenn Parsons (2002). Nature Appreciation, Science, and Positive Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (3):279-295.
    Scientific cognitivism is the idea that nature must be aesthetically appreciated in light of scientific information about it. I defend Carlson's traditional formulation of scientific cognitivism from some recent criticisms. However, I also argue that if we employ this formulation it is difficult to uphold two claims that Carlson makes about scientific cognitivism: (i) it is the correct analysis of the notion of appropriate aesthetic appreciation of nature, and (ii) it justifies the idea that nature, seen aright, (...)
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  19.  52
    Eric S. Nelson (2012). Aesthetics, Ethics and Nature in Adorno. In Jerome / Giles Carroll (ed.), Aesthetics and Modernity from Schiller to the Frankfurt School. Peter Lang
    In response to Jürgen Habermas’s critical assessment of the import of Theodor Adorno’s aesthetics, I revisit Adorno’s aesthetics in the context of the question of whether and to what extent there can be an aesthetics of nature, and the potential ethical and social-political significance of such an aesthetics.
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  20.  20
    R. Paden, L. K. Harmon & C. R. Milling (2012). Ecology, Evolution, and Aesthetics: Towards an Evolutionary Aesthetics of Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (2):123-139.
    Allen Carlson has argued that a proper aesthetics of nature must judge nature for ‘what it is’, and that such judgements must be informed by a scientific understanding of nature, in particular, one shaped by the science of ecology. Carlson uses these claims to support his theory of positive aesthetics. This paper argues that there are problems in this view. First, it misunderstands ecology, thereby adopting a view of the natural world that holds it to be much (...)
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  21.  44
    Glenn Parsons (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Aesthetics of Nature. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1106-1112.
    Traditionally, analytic philosophers writing on aesthetics have given short shrift to nature. The last thirty years, however, have seen a steady growth of interest in this area. The essays and books now available cover central philosophical issues concerning the nature of the aesthetic and the existence of norms for aesthetic judgement. They also intersect with important issues in environmental philosophy. More recent contributions have opened up new topics, such as the relationship between natural sound and music, the beauty (...)
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  22.  16
    Nicolas de Warren (2009). Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism. Environmental Philosophy 6 (1):116-120.
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  23.  13
    Alejandra Mancilla (2011). Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (Eds.): Nature, Aesthetics and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 20 (3):449-452.
  24.  4
    V. Zuska & O. Dadejik (2007). Landscape as a Mask of Nature: The Aesthetics of Subversion Versus the Aesthetics of Conformity. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aestetics; Until 2008: Estetika (Aesthetics) 44 (1-4):28-44.
    The article considers the possibilities of the function and constitution of aesthetic value in the contemporary, ambivalent notion of landscape. It begins with a preliminary analysis of three key concepts central to current discussions – namely, nature, landscape, and environment. It presents one of the dominant models of contemporary ideas about the aesthetics of landscape – the natural environmental model –, and in particular its ambition to accommodate both the true character of today’s relationship between man and his habitat (...)
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  25. Nicolas Fernando de Warren (2009). A. Carlson (Ed.), Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. Of the Idea of Nature. Environmental Philosophy 6 (1):162-166.
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  26.  69
    Nick Zangwill (2013). Clouds of Illusion in the Aesthetics of Nature. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):576-596.
    I defend extreme formalism about the aesthetics of inorganic nature. I outline the general issue over aesthetic formalism as it manifests itself in the visual arts. The main issue is over whether we need to know about the history of artworks in order to appreciate them aesthetically. I then turn to nature and concede that with organic nature we need to know a thing's biological kinds if we are fully to appreciate it. However, with in organic (...) I deny that we need to know the deeper nature of the things we experience. What is important, I argue, are the appearances of those things not their real natures. I consider the beauty of clouds, which depends on an illusion of solidity, and I argue that scientific knowledge does not reveal beauty that is not available to the ignoramous. There is only the beauty of appearances, and it does not matter whether those appearances are accurate or illusory. (shrink)
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  27.  83
    Allen Carlson (1984). Nature and Positive Aesthetics. Environmental Ethics 6 (1):5-34.
    Positive aesthetics holds that the natural environment, insofar as it is unaffected by man, has only positive aesthetic qualities and value-that virgin nature is essentially beautiful. In spite of the initial implausibility of this position, it is nonetheless suggested by many individuals who have given serious thought to the natural environment and to environmental philosophy. Certain attempts to defend theposition involve claiming either that it is not implausible because our appreciation of nature is not genuinely aesthetic, or that (...)
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  28.  66
    Malcom Budd (2000). The Aesthetics of Nature. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):137–157.
    I begin by demonstrating the inadequacy of the idea that the aesthetic appreciation of nature should be understood as the appreciation of nature as if it were art. This leads to a consideration of three theses: (i) from the aesthetic point of view natural items should be appreciated under concepts of the natural things or phenomena they are, (ii) what aesthetic properties a natural item really possesses is determined by the right categories of nature to experience the (...)
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  29.  60
    By Allen Carlson (2005). Budd and Brady on the Aesthetics of Nature. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 55 (218):106–113.
    This essay is a critical notice of Malcolm Budd's _The Aesthetics of Nature (Oxford, 2002) and Emily Brady's _Aesthetics of the Natural Environment (Edinburgh, 2003). I argue that, although each of the volumes makes an important contribution to our understanding of the aesthetic experience of nature, the accounts of aesthetic appreciation of nature that are developed by Budd and Brady are each somewhat defective in that neither grants an adequate role to knowledge in such appreciation, and specifically (...)
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  30.  19
    Allen Carlson (2007). The Requirements for An Adequate Aesthetics of Nature. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1/2):1-13.
    This essay presents a methodological framework for assessing the adequacy of philosophical accounts of the aesthetic appreciation of nature. The framework involves five requirements, each of which is labeled after a philosopher who has defended it. They are called Ziff's Anything Viewed Doctrine, Budd's As Nature Constraint, Berleant's Unified Aesthetics Requirement, Hepburn's Serious Beauty Intuition, and Thompson's Objectivity Desideratum. The conclusion of the essay is that most contemporary treatments of the aesthetics of nature fail to comply with (...)
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  31.  19
    Roger Paden, Laurly K. Harmon & Charles R. Milling (2013). Philosophical Histories of the Aesthetics of Nature. Environmental Ethics 35 (1):57-77.
    Beginning with Ronald Hepburn’s path-breaking essay, “Contemporary Aesthetics and the Neglect of Natural Beauty,” which helped establish the modern discipline of environmental aesthetics, philosophers have provided sketches of what, after Hegel, might be called “philosophical histories of the aesthetics of nature.” These histories are remarkably similar and can easily be blended together to create a “received history” of the discipline. This history has subtly influenced work in the field. Unfortunately, it is not completely accurate and, as a result, has (...)
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  32.  12
    Ian Harris (2007). Landscape Aesthetics and Environmentalism: Some Observations on the Representation of Nature in Buddhist and Western Art1. Contemporary Buddhism 8 (2):149-168.
    (2007). Landscape Aesthetics and Environmentalism: Some Observations on the Representation of Nature in Buddhist and Western Art1. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 8, Buddhism and the environment, pp. 149-168. doi: 10.1080/14639940701636125.
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  33.  22
    Marta Tafalla (2011). Rehabilitating the Aesthetics of Nature. Environmental Ethics 33 (1):45-56.
    At the end of the 1960s, two philosophers who did not know each other, and who came from different traditions and wrote in different languages, published two texts at almost the same time that called for the reinstatement of a philosophical discipline that had been largely abandoned by academia: the aesthetics of nature. One of the philosophers was Ronald Hepburn. His text, entitled “Contemporary Aesthetics and the Neglect of Natural Beauty,” appeared in 1966. The other was Theodor W. Adorno, (...)
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  34.  9
    Noel E. Boulting (1999). The Aesthetics of Nature. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 6 (3/4):21-34.
    Three paradigms for making sense of the aesthetic experience of nature---Specularism, Scientific Exemplarism and Perspectivalism---are found in the literature on the aesthetics of nature. The first focuses on seeing nature as a picture, the second on grasping aesthetic experience through the categories of scientific enquiry and the third emphasizes a more phenomenological relation between the experienced and the experiencer. After the historical development which fashioned Specularism’s approach to aestheticshas been indicated and the ahistorical nature of Scientific (...)
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  35.  11
    Allen Carlson (2005). Review: Budd and Brady on the Aesthetics of Nature. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 55 (218):106 - 113.
    This essay is a critical notice of Malcolm Budd's _The Aesthetics of Nature (Oxford, 2002) and Emily Brady's _Aesthetics of the Natural Environment (Edinburgh, 2003). I argue that, although each of the volumes makes an important contribution to our understanding of the aesthetic experience of nature, the accounts of aesthetic appreciation of nature that are developed by Budd and Brady are each somewhat defective in that neither grants an adequate role to knowledge in such appreciation, and specifically (...)
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  36.  1
    Carlos Bizarro Morais (1992). For an Aesthetics of Nature (in Portuguese). Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 48 (1):77-98.
    We may legitimately say that nature -- in the multiplicity of its objects -- has been considered in his history of aesthetics, as a central ground of aesthetical experience, and also as object of theoretical investigation on the modalities of that experience. On the other hand, a process is at present observed in which, that theme has been slowly considered of secondary importance, mainly after Hegel's aesthetics -- or rather philosophy of art. In this paper we try to show (...)
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  37. Emily Brady (2013). The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature. Cambridge University Press.
    In The Sublime in Modern Philosophy: Aesthetics, Ethics, and Nature, Emily Brady takes a fresh look at the sublime and shows why it endures as a meaningful concept in contemporary philosophy. In a reassessment of historical approaches, the first part of the book identifies the scope and value of the sublime in eighteenth-century philosophy, nineteenth-century philosophy and Romanticism, and early wilderness aesthetics. The second part examines the sublime's contemporary significance through its relationship to the arts; its position with respect (...)
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  38. Allen Carlson (2002). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art and Architecture. Routledge.
    Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature, in our response to sunsets, mountains or horizons or more mundane surroundings, like gardens or the view from our window. He argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience and that scientific understanding of nature can enhance our appreciation of it, rather than denigrate (...)
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  39. Allen Carlson (2002). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art and Architecture. Routledge.
    Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature. He argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience and that scientific understanding of nature can enhance our appreciation of it, rather than denigrate it.
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  40. Allen Carlson (2008). Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics. Cup.
    The roots of environmental aesthetics reach back to the ideas of eighteenth-century thinkers who found nature an ideal source of aesthetic experience. Today, having blossomed into a significant subfield of aesthetics, environmental aesthetics studies and encourages the appreciation of not just natural environments but also human-made and human-modified landscapes. _Nature and Landscape_ is an important introduction to this rapidly growing area of aesthetic understanding and appreciation. Allen Carlson begins by tracing the development of the field's historical background, and then (...)
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  41. Justine Noel (1993). Hume's Science of Aesthetics: Human Nature and the Century of Criticism. Dissertation, Queen's University at Kingston (Canada)
    Although Hume did not produce any major work in aesthetics, several of his essays, as well as numerous passages in A Treatise of Human Nature and in An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, do address central debates in eighteenth-century aesthetics. In this dissertation I show that Hume made some interesting contributions to these debates that in fact changed the course of aesthetic inquiry. He was the first British thinker to apply systematically an empirical method to such aesthetic concepts (...)
     
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  42.  72
    Alexander Rueger (2007). Kant and the Aesthetics of Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):138-155.
    I try to identify the characteristic and distinguishing features of a theory of natural beauty (as opposed to the sublime) that can be found in Kant's Critique of Judgement. Lest this may seem superfluous, I argue first that, contrary to a common view, Kant's theory does not take the experience of beauty in nature as theoretically basic and that he does not deal with beauty in art only as a derivative case of aesthetic experience. I then try to understand (...)
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  43.  75
    Sucharita Gamlath (1969). Indian Aesthetics and the Nature of Dramatic Emotions. British Journal of Aesthetics 9 (4):372-386.
    A short exposition, With comments, Of the philosophical investigations into the nature and aesthetic experience of emotions represented in drama by the mediaeval indian philosophers, Bharata, Bhatt lollata, Shri shankuka, Bhatta nayaka and abhinavagupta. The conclusions reached by these philosophers are contrasted briefly with the position taken up regarding this problem by contemporary english and american aestheticians.
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  44. Wang Keping (2007). Appreciating Nature in View of Practical Aesthetics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (1):140-149.
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  45. Richard S. Moore (1982). That Cunning Alphabet Melville's Aesthetics of Nature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  46. Balram Srivastava (1985). Nature of Indian Aesthetics, with Special Reference to Śilpa. Chaukhambha Orientalia.
     
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  47.  49
    Yuriko Saito (1998). The Aesthetics of Unscenic Nature. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (2):101-111.
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  48.  64
    Mary Carman Rose (1976). Nature as Aesthetic Object: An Essay in Meta-Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (1):3-12.
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  49.  70
    Lars-Olof Åhlberg (1993). The Nature and Limits of Analytic Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (1):5-16.
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  50.  35
    Steve Odin (1991). The Japanese Concept of Nature in Relation to the Environmental Ethics and Conservation Aesthetics of Aldo Leopold. Environmental Ethics 13 (4):345-360.
    I focus on the religio-aesthetic concept of nature in Japanese Buddhism as a valuable complement to environmental philosophy in the West and develop an explicit comparison of the Japanese Buddhist concept of nature and the ecological world view of Aldo Leopold. I discuss the profound current of ecological thought running through the Kegon, Tendai, Shingon, Zen, Pure Land, and Nichiren Buddhist traditions as weIl as modem Japanese philosophy as represented by Nishida Kitarö and Watsuji Tetsurö. In this context, (...)
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