Search results for 'Nature Effect of human beings on' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Helen Thornton (2005). State of Nature or Eden?: Thomas Hobbes and His Contemporaries on the Natural Condition of Human Beings. University of Rochester Press.score: 2176.7
    State of nature or Eden? -- Hobbes' state of nature as an account of the fall? -- Hobbes' own belief or unbelief -- The contemporary reaction to Leviathan -- Hobbes and commentaries on Genesis -- A note on method and chapter order -- Good and evil -- Hobbes on good and evil -- The 'seditious doctrines' of the schoolmen -- The contemporary reaction -- The scriptural account -- The state of nature as an account of the fall? (...)
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  2. Jason T. Eberl (2004). Aquinas on the Nature of Human Beings. Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):333 - 365.score: 1927.5
  3. Eric W. Sanderson, Malanding Jaiteh, Marc A. Levy, Kent H. Redford, Antoinette V. Wannebo & Gillian Woolmer (2002). The Human Footprint and the Last of the Wild The Human Footprint is a Global Map of Human Influence on the Land Surface, Which Suggests That Human Beings Are Stewards of Nature, Whether We Like It or Not. BioScience 52 (10):891-904.score: 1912.5
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  4. James S. Trefil (2004). Human Nature: A Blueprint for Managing the Earth--By People, for People. Times Books/Henry Holt.score: 1872.0
    A radical approach to the environment which argues that by harnessing the power of science for human benefit, we can have a healthier planet As a prizewinning theoretical physicist and an outspoken advocate for scientific literacy, James Trefil has long been the public's guide to a better understanding of the world. In this provocative book, Trefil looks squarely at our environmental future and finds-contrary to popular wisdom-reason to celebrate. For too long, Trefil argues, humans have treated nature as (...)
     
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  5. Carolyn Merchant (2003). Reinventing Eden: The Fate of Nature in Western Culture. Routledge.score: 1854.0
    Visionary quests to return to the Garden of Eden have shaped Western culture from Columbus' voyages to today's tropical island retreats. Few narratives are so powerful - and, as Carolyn Merchant shows, so misguided and destructive - as the dream of recapturing a lost paradise. A sweeping account of these quixotic endeavors by one of America's leading environmentalists, Reinventing Eden traces the idea of rebuilding the primeval garden from its origins to its latest incarnations in shopping malls, theme parks and (...)
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  6. Robert B. Louden (2011). Kant's Human Being: Essays on His Theory of Human Nature. OUP USA.score: 1832.5
    In Kant's Human Being, Robert B. Louden continues and deepens avenues of research first initiated in his highly acclaimed book, Kant's Impure Ethics. Drawing on a wide variety of both published and unpublished works spanning all periods of Kant's extensive writing career, Louden here focuses on Kant's under-appreciated empirical work on human nature, with particular attention to the connections between this body of work and his much-discussed ethical theory. Kant repeatedly claimed that the question, "What is the (...)
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  7. William Leiss (1972/1974). The Domination of Nature. Boston,Beacon Press.score: 1764.0
    In Part One Leiss traces the idea of the domination of nature from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century.
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  8. Gregory E. Kaebnick (ed.) (2011). The Ideal of Nature: Debates About Biotechnology and the Environment. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 1764.0
    This volume probes whether "nature" and "the natural" are capable of guiding moral deliberations in policy making.
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  9. R. F. Ellen & Katsuyoshi Fukui (eds.) (1996). Redefining Nature: Ecology, Culture, and Domestication. Berg.score: 1764.0
    - How can anthropology improve our understanding of the interrelationship between nature and culture? - What can anthropology contribute to practical debates which depend on particular definitions of nature, such as that concerning sustainable development? Humankind has evolved over several million years by living in and utilizing 'nature' and by assimilating it into 'culture'. Indeed, the technological and cultural advancement of the species has been widely acknowledged to rest upon human domination and control of nature. (...)
     
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  10. Martinus Antonius Maria Drenthen, Jozef Keulartz & James D. Proctor (eds.) (2009). New Visions of Nature: Complexity and Authenticity. Springer.score: 1728.0
    The contributions to this volume explore perceptual and conceptual boundaries between the human and the natural, or between an 'out there' and 'in here.
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  11. Philip W. Sutton (2004). Nature, Environment, and Society. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 1626.0
    How have sociologists responded to the emergence of environmentalism? What has sociology to offer the study of environmental problems? This uniquely comprehensive guide traces the origins and development of environmental movements and environmental issues, providing a critical review of the most significant debates in the new field of environmental sociology. It covers environmental ideas, environmental movements, social constructionism, critical realism, "ecocentric" theory, environmental identities, risk society theory, sustainable development, Green consumerism, ecological modernization and debates around modernity and post- modernity. Philip (...)
     
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  12. Hans-Peter Krüger (2009). The Public Nature of Human Beings. Parallels Between Classical Pragmatisms and Helmuth Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology. Iris 1 (1):195-204.score: 1617.5
    Though Helmuth Plessner (1892-1985) elaborated his philosophical anthropology independently of the classical pragmatisms, there are many parallels with them. He combined a phenomenology of living beings (a parallel with William James) with a semiotic reconstruction (a parallel with Charles Sanders Peirce) of what we are already using whenever we specify living beings, among them ourselves as human living beings in nature, culture, and society. In Plessner’s distinction between having a body (Körperhaben) and being (or living) (...)
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  13. James V. Kohl (2012). Human Pheromones and Food Odors: Epigenetic Influences on the Socioaffective Nature of Evolved Behaviors. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.score: 1610.0
    Background: Olfactory cues directly link the environment to gene expression. Two types of olfactory cues, food odors and social odors, alter genetically predisposed hormone-mediated activity in the mammalian brain. Methods: The honeybee is a model organism for understanding the epigenetic link from food odors and social odors to neural networks of the mammalian brain, which ultimately determine human behavior. Results: Pertinent aspects that extend the honeybee model to human behavior include bottom-up followed by top-down gene, cell, tissue, organ, (...)
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  14. Laurie Zoloth (2002). Reasonable Magic and the Nature of Alchemy: Jewish Reflections on Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (1):65-93.score: 1595.0
    : The controversy about research on human embryonic stem cells both divides and defines us, raising fundamental ethical and religious questions about the nature of the self and the limits of science. This article uses Jewish sources to articulate fundamental concerns about the forbiddenness of knowledge in general and of knowledge thought of as magical creation. Alchemy, and the turning of elements into gold and into substances for longevity, and magic used for the creation of living beings (...)
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  15. Niklas Luhmann (1989). Ecological Communication. Polity Press.score: 1542.0
    Niklas Luhmann is widely recognized as one of the most original thinkers in the social sciences today. This major new work further develops the theories of the author by offering a challenging analysis of the relationship between society and the environment. Luhmann extends the concept of "ecology" to refer to any analysis that looks at connections between social systems and the surrounding environment. He traces the development of the notion of "environment" from the medieval idea--which encompasses both human and (...)
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  16. William James (1902/2002). The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature: Being the Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion Delivered at Edinburgh in 1901-1902. Dover Publications.score: 1535.7
    After completing his monumental work, The Principles of Psychology, William James turned his attention to serious consideration of such important religious and philosophical questions as the nature and existence of God, immortality of the soul, and free will and determinism. His interest in these questions found expression in various works, including The Varieties of Religious Experience, his classic study of spirituality. Based on the prestigious Gifford Lectures on Natural Religion he gave at the University of Edinburgh in 1901 and (...)
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  17. Derrick Jensen (2008). How Shall I Live My Life?: On Liberating the Earth From Civilization. Pm Press.score: 1524.0
    In this collection of interviews, Derrick Jensen discusses the destructive dominant culture with ten people who have devoted their lives to undermining it. Whether it is Carolyn Raffensperger and her radical approach to public health, or Thomas Berry on perceiving the sacred; be it Kathleen Dean Moore reminding us that our bodies are made of mountains, rivers, and sunlight; or Vine Deloria asserting that our dreams tell us more about the world than science ever can, the activists and philosophers interviewed (...)
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  18. Gilles Lamoureux (2004). Towards the Death of Humanity: Dehumanization: The Affliction Destroying Mankind and Modern Society, Immunologist and Emeritus Professor. Authorhouse.score: 1522.0
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  19. S. J. Samartha & Lynn De Silva (eds.) (1979). Man in Nature: Guest or Engineer?: A Preliminary Enquiry by Christians and Buddhists Into the Religious Dimensions in Humanity's Relation to Nature. Ecumenical Institute for Study and Dialogue in Co-Operation with the World Council of Churches.score: 1512.0
     
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  20. E. Cioflec (2012). On Hannah Arendt: The Worldly In-Between of Human Beings and its Ethical Consequences. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):646-663.score: 1500.0
    In this paper, I show how a concept of ethics can be derived from Hannah Arendt’s theory of action in The Human Condition , which contains from her call for action. When she looks at the ‘political actor’, as well as at the concept of ‘political situation’, her ethical claim is first of all the need to take initiative, to act. Hence, ‘political situations’ as she defines them are discussed as common responsibilities. But common responsibility is rooted in the (...)
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  21. Stephen Duguid (2010). Nature in Modernity: Servant, Citizen, Queen or Comrade. Peter Lang.score: 1494.0
    This is explored in a series of chapters that focus on our hunter-gatherer heritage, the shift to a more sedentary and agricultural life and the subsequent ...
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  22. Giovanni Felice Azzone (2003). The Dual Biological Identity of Human Beings and the Naturalization of Morality. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (2):211 - 241.score: 1460.0
    The last two centuries have been the centuries of the discovery of the cell evolution: in the XIX century of the germinal cells and in the XX century of two groups of somatic cells, namely those of the brain-mind and of the immune systems. Since most cells do not behave in this way, the evolutionary character of the brain-mind and of the immune systems renders human beings formed by two different groups of somatic cells, one with a deterministic (...)
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  23. Brian Clegg (2010). Armageddon Science: The Science of Mass Destruction. St. Martin's Press.score: 1458.0
    Mad scientists -- Big bangs and black holes -- Atomic devastation -- Climate catastrophe -- Extreme biohazard -- Gray goo -- Information meltdown -- No longer human -- Future fears and natural pitfalls -- Cautious optimism.
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  24. Shu-hsien Liu & Kwong-loi Shun (1996). Some Reflections on Mencius' Views of Mind-Heart and Human Nature. Philosophy East and West 46 (2):143-164.score: 1445.8
    The origin, content, argumentative basis, practical implication, and influence of Mencius' views of mind-heart and human nature are discussed. While the differences between Confucius and Mencius are acknowledged, it is argued that Mencius' view that human nature is good is consistent with and is a further development of basic ideas in Confucius' thinking. The basis of Mencius' view is not empirical generalization but inner reflection and personal experience, which reveal a shared natural endowment in human (...)
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  25. Tamara Giles-Vernick (2002). Cutting the Vines of the Past: Environmental Histories of the Central African Rain Forest. University Press of Virginia.score: 1440.0
    Cutting the Vines of the Past offers a novel argument: African ways of seeing and interpreting their environments and past are not only critical to how ...
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  26. John Elder (2006). Pilgrimage to Vallombrosa: From Vermont to Italy in the Footsteps of George Perkins Marsh. University of Virginia Press.score: 1440.0
    Marrying the map -- Headwaters -- Compatriots -- Saint Beech -- After olive picking -- Hunter in the sky -- Gifts of prophecy -- The broken sheepfold -- Mowing -- Dust of snow -- Inheriting Mount Tom -- Forever wild again -- Into the wind -- Maggie Brook.
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  27. David Hume (2000). A Treatise of Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning Into Moral Subjects. OUP Oxford.score: 1428.0
    A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40), David Hume's comprehensive attempt to base philosophy on a new, observationally grounded study of human nature, is one of the most important texts in Western philosophy. It is also the focal point of current attempts to understand 18th-century philosophy. -/- The Treatise first explains how we form such concepts as cause and effect, external existence, and personal identity, and to form compelling but unconfirmable beliefs in the entities represented by (...)
     
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  28. P. C. W. Davies & Jill Gready (eds.) (1995). God, Cosmos, Nature, and Creativity. Scottish Academic Press.score: 1422.0
     
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  29. Moṭi Yardeni (2007). Ḳofim ʻim Shigaʻon Gadlut: O, Zeh Pashuṭ Yoter Mi-Mah She-Ḥashavtem. Shalhevet.score: 1422.0
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  30. Fabrice Jotterand (2008). Beyond Therapy and Enhancement: The Alteration of Human Nature. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 2 (1):15-23.score: 1362.5
    With the rapid progress and considerable promise of nanobiotechnology/neurosciences there is the potential of transforming the very nature of human beings and of how humans can conceive of themselves as rational animals through technological innovations. The interface between humans and machines (neuro-digital interface), can potentially alter what it means to be human, i.e., the very idea of human nature and of normal functioning will be changed. In this paper, I argue that we are potentially (...)
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  31. Angus Nicholls (2010). Review Symposium: The Fremdling of Teleology, Or: On Roger Smith's Being Human Roger Smith, Being Human: Historical Knowledge and the Creation of Human Nature. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2007. Viii + 288 Pp. ISBN 978-0-7190-7498-1. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):194-201.score: 1338.7
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  32. Abraham P. Bos (2010). Aristotle on the Difference Between Plants, Animals, and Human Beings and on the Elements as Instruments of the Soul (De Anima 2.4.415b18). [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 63 (4):821-841.score: 1332.0
    Why do all animals possess sense perception while plants don’t? And should the difference in quality of life between human beings and wolves be explained by supposing that wolves have degenerated souls? This paper argues that for Aristotle differences in quality of life among living beings are based on differences in the quality of their soul-principle together with the body that receives the soul. The paper proposes a new interpretation of On the Soul 2.4.415b18: “For all the (...)
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  33. Antonella Corradini (2003). On the Normativity of Human Nature: Some Epistemological Remarks. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (2):239 – 254.score: 1332.0
    This paper examines the role played by the concept of human nature in ethical theory. The focus is on the epistemological problems that arise from application of this notion to the foundation of ethics. From this viewpoint, two theories, the neoscholastic and the neoclassical ones, are expounded, analyzed and compared. The aim is to highlight their opposite ways of relating the "ought-to-be" (of norms) to the "is" (of human nature). The conclusion is drawn that an adequate (...)
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  34. Yonghe Cui (ed.) (2011). Zou Xiang Hou Xian Dai de Huan Jing Lun Li. Ren Min Chu Ban She.score: 1332.0
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  35. Margherita D'Amico (2007). La Pelle Dell'orso: Noi E Gli Altri Animali. Mondadori.score: 1332.0
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  36. Warwick Fox (1990). Toward a Transpersonal Ecology: Developing New Foundations for Environmentalism. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.score: 1332.0
  37. Xiaocheng Han (2005). Ke Xue Mian Lin Wei Ji: Xian Dai Ke Ji de Ren Wen Fan Si. Zhongguo She Hui Chu Ban She.score: 1332.0
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  38. Nicodème Sako (2009). Comment Rendre Une Nation Puissante: Stratégies Pour le Pouvoir des Nations. Books on Demand Gmbh.score: 1332.0
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  39. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2011). On the Elusive Nature of the Human Self: Divining the Ontological Dynamics of Animate Being. In J. Wentzel Van Huyssteen & Erik P. Wiebe (eds.), In Search of Self: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Personhood. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co.. 198.score: 1325.3
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  40. Gregor Schiemann (2009). Hermann von Helmholtz's Mechanism: The Loss of Certainty. A Study on the Transition From Classical to Modern Philosophy of Nature. Springer.score: 1322.0
    Two seemingly contradictory tendencies have accompanied the development of the natural sciences in the past 150 years. On the one hand, the natural sciences have been instrumental in effecting a thoroughgoing transformation of social structures and have made a permanent impact on the conceptual world of human beings. This histori¬cal period has, on the other hand, also brought to light the merely hypothetical validity of scientific knowledge. As late as the middle of the 19th century the truth-pathos in (...)
     
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  41. Rita Astuti & Maurice Bloch (2010). Why a Theory of Human Nature Cannot Be Based on the Distinction Between Universality and Variability: Lessons From Anthropology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):83-84.score: 1299.7
    We welcome the critical appraisal of the database used by the behavioral sciences, but we suggest that the authors' differentiation between variable and universal features is ill conceived and that their categorization of non-WEIRD populations is misleading. We propose a different approach to comparative research, which takes population variability seriously and recognizes the methodological difficulties it engenders.
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  42. Howard Williams (2013). Review: Louden, Kant's Human Being: Essays on His Theory of Human Nature. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 18 (1):154-157.score: 1286.7
    Book Reviews Howard Williams, Kantian Review , FirstView Article.
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  43. Pablo Muchnik (2013). Reflections on Robert Louden's Kant's Human Being: Essays on His Theory of Human Nature. Kantian Review 18 (3):461-471.score: 1286.7
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  44. H. Svobodova (1991). Nature-Landscape-Human-Being (Chapters on Sociological-Theory of Landscape). Filosoficky Casopis 39 (6):944-954.score: 1273.3
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  45. David Hume (1739/2000). A Treatise of Human Nature. Oxford University Press.score: 1250.0
    A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-40), David Hume's comprehensive attempt to base philosophy on a new, observationally grounded study of human nature, is one of the most important texts in Western philosophy. It is also the focal point of current attempts to understand 18th-century philosophy. -/- The Treatise first explains how we form such concepts as cause and effect, external existence, and personal identity, and to form compelling but unconfirmable beliefs in the entities represented by (...)
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  46. Peter Langford (1986). Modern Philosophies of Human Nature: Their Emergence From Christian Thought. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic.score: 1220.0
    Chapter 1 : Introduction General Argument My aim is to survey some of the most influential philosophical writers on human nature from the time that ...
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  47. Patrick L. Taylor (2005). The Gap Between Law and Ethics in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Overcoming the Effect of U.S. Federal Policy on Research Advances and Public Benefit. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):589-616.score: 1218.0
    Key ethical issues arise in association with the conduct of stem cell research by research institutions in the United States. These ethical issues, summarized in detail, receive no adequate translation into federal laws or regulations, also described in this article. U.S. Federal policy takes a passive approach to these ethical issues, translating them simply into limitations on taxpayer funding, and foregoes scientific and ethical leadership while protecting intellectual property interests through a laissez faire approach to stem cell patents and licenses. (...)
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  48. Colleen McCluskey (2008). Bernard of Clairvaux on the Nature of Human Agency. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 64 (1):297 - 317.score: 1218.0
    There has been a great deal of interest in medieval action theory in recent years. Nonetheless, relatively little work has been done on figures prior to the so-called High Middle Ages, and much of what has been done has focused on better-known thinkers, such as Augustine and Anselm. By comparison, Bernard of Clairvaux's treatise, De gratia et libero arbitrio has been neglected. Yet his treatise is quoted widely by such important scholars as Philip the Chancellor, Alexander of Hales, and Albertus (...)
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  49. Paul Formosa (2007). Kant on the Radical Evil of Human Nature. Philosophical Forum 38 (3):221–245.score: 1213.7
    In ‘Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason’ Kant presents his thesis that human nature is ‘radically evil’. To be radically evil is to have a propensity toward moral frailty, impurity and even perversity. Kant claims that all humans are ‘by nature’ radically evil. By presenting counter-examples of moral saints, I argue that not all humans are morally corrupt, even if most are. Even so, the possibility of moral failure is central to what makes us human.
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