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Profile: Ned Hall (Harvard University)
  1. Ned Hall & Alan Hájek, Induction and Probability.
    Arguably, Hume's greatest single contribution to contemporary philosophy of science has been the problem of induction (1739). Before attempting its statement, we need to spend a few words identifying the subject matter of this corner of epistemology. At a first pass, induction concerns ampliative inferences drawn on the basis of evidence (presumably, evidence acquired more or less directly from experience)—that is, inferences whose conclusions are not (validly) entailed by the premises. Philosophers have historically drawn further distinctions, often appropriating the term (...)
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  2. Ned Hall, Humean Reductionism About Laws of Nature.
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  3. Ned Hall (2014). Writing the Book of the World by Theodore Sider. Journal of Philosophy 111 (4):219-224.
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  4. Ned Hall & L. A. Paul (2013). Metaphysically Reductive Causation. Erkenntnis 78 (1):9-41.
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  5. L. A. Paul & Ned Hall (2013). Causation: A User's Guide. Oxford.
    Causation is at once familiar and mysterious--we can detect its presence in the world, but we cannot agree on the metaphysics of the causal relation. L. A. Paul and Ned Hall guide the reader through the most important philosophical treatments of causation, and develop a broad and sophisticated understanding of the issues under debate.
     
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  6. Ned Hall (2012). Comments on Michael Strevens's Depth. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (2):474-482.
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  7. Ned Hall (2011). Causation and the Sciences. In Steven French & Juha Saatsi (eds.), Continuum Companion to the Philosophy of Science. Continuum. 96--119.
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  8. Ned Hall, David Lewis's Metaphysics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  9. Ned Hall (2007). Review of Wesley C. Salmon, Phil Dowe (Ed.), Merrilee H. Salmon (Ed.), Reality and Rationality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (1).
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  10. Branden Fitelson, Alan Hajek & Ned Hall (2006). Probability. In Jessica Pfeifer & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), The Philosophy of Science: An Encyclopedia. Routledge.
    There are two central questions concerning probability. First, what are its formal features? That is a mathematical question, to which there is a standard, widely (though not universally) agreed upon answer. This answer is reviewed in the next section. Second, what sorts of things are probabilities---what, that is, is the subject matter of probability theory? This is a philosophical question, and while the mathematical theory of probability certainly bears on it, the answer must come from elsewhere. To see why, observe (...)
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  11. Ned Hall (2006). Comments on Woodward, "Making Things Happen". [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (4):611 - 624.
  12. Ned Hall (2006). Philosophy of Causation: Blind Alleys Exposed; Promising Directions Highlighted. Philosophy Compass 1 (1):86–94.
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  13. Ned Hall (2005). Causation. In Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  14. Ned Hall (2005). Causation and Ceteris Paribus Laws. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (1):80-99.
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  15. John Collins, Ned Hall & L. A. Paul (2004). Counterfactuals and Causation: History, Problems, and Prospects. In John Collins, Ned Hall & Laurie Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. The Mit Press. 1--57.
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  16. John Collins, Ned Hall & Laurie Paul (eds.) (2004). Causation and Counterfactuals. The Mit Press.
    Thirty years after Lewis's paper, this book brings together some of the most important recent work connecting—or, in some cases, disputing the connection ...
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  17. Ned Hall (2004). Rescued From the Rubbish Bin: Lewis on Causation. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1107-1114.
    Lewis's work on causation was governed by a familiar methodological approach: the aim was to come up with an account of causation that would recover, in as elegant a fashion as possible, all of our firm “pre‐theoretic” intuitions about hypothetical cases. That methodology faces an obvious challenge, in that it is not clear why anyone not interested in the semantics of the English word “cause” should care about its results. Better to take a different approach, one which treats our intuitions (...)
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  18. Ned Hall (2004). Two Concepts of Causation. In John Collins, Ned Hall & Laurie Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. The Mit Press. 225-276.
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  19. Ned Hall (2004). The Intrinsic Character of Causation. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 1:255-300.
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  20. Ned Hall (2004). Two Mistakes About Credence and Chance. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):93 – 111.
    David Lewis's influential work on the epistemology and metaphysics of objective chance has convinced many philosophers of the central importance of the following two claims: First, it is a serious cost of reductionist positions about chance (such as that occupied by Lewis) that they are, apparently, forced to modify the Principal Principle--the central principle relating objective chance to rational subjective probability--in order to avoid contradiction. Second, it is a perhaps more serious cost of the rival non-reductionist position that, unlike reductionism, (...)
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  21. Ned Hall, L. A. Paul & John Collins (eds.) (2004). Causation and Counterfactuals. Cambridge, Mass.: Mit Press.
    A collection of important recent work on the counterfactual analysis of causation.
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  22. Frank Arntzenius & Ned Hall (2003). On What We Know About Chance. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):171-179.
    The ‘Principal Principle’ states, roughly, that one's subjective probability for a proposition should conform to one's beliefs about that proposition's objective chance of coming true. David Lewis has argued (i) that this principle provides the defining role for chance; (ii) that it conflicts with his reductionist thesis of Humean supervenience, and so must be replaced by an amended version that avoids the conflict; hence (iii) that nothing perfectly deserves the name ‘chance’, although something can come close enough by playing the (...)
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  23. Ned Hall & Laurie Ann Paul (2003). Causation and Preemption. In Peter Clark & Katherine Hawley (eds.), Philosophy of Science Today. Oxford University Press.
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  24. Ned Hall (2002). David Lewis. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 10 (1):81-84.
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  25. Ned Hall (2002). Non-Locality on the Cheap? A New Problem for Counterfactual Analyses of Causation. Noûs 36 (2):276–294.
  26. Ned Hall (2001). Ontology of Mind. Helen Steward. Mind 110 (440):1123-1127.
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  27. Ned Hall (2000). Causation and the Price of Transitivity. Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):198-222.
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  28. Ned Hall (1999). George Greenstein and Arthur G. Zajonc The Quantum Challenge. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50:313-315.
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  29. Ned Hall (1999). How to Set a Surprise Exam. Mind 108 (432):647-703.
    The professor announces a surprise exam for the upcoming week; her clever student purports to demonstrate by reductio that she cannot possibly give such an exam. Diagnosing his puzzling argument reveals a deeper puzzle: Is the student justified in believing the announcement? It would seem so, particularly if the upcoming 'week' is long enough. On the other hand, a plausible principle states that if, at the outset, the student is justified in believing some proposition, then he is also justified in (...)
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  30. Ned Hall (1999). Book Review:Causality and Explanation Wesley C. Salmon. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 66 (3):497-.
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  31. Alex Byrne & Ned Hall (1998). Against the PCA-Analysis. Analysis 58 (1):38–44.
    Jonardon Ganeri, Paul Noordhof, and Murali Ramachandran (1996) have proposed a new counterfactual analysis of causation. We argue that this – the PCA-analysis – is incorrect. In section 1, we explain David Lewis’s first counterfactual analysis of causation, and a problem that led him to propose a second. In section 2 we explain the PCA-analysis, advertised as an improvement on Lewis’s later account. We then give counterexamples to the necessity (section 3) and sufficiency (section 4) of the PCA-analysis.
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  32. Ned Hall (1994). Correcting the Guide to Objective Chance. Mind 103 (412):505-518.