16 found
Sort by:
  1. Neil A. Manson, Cosmic Fine-Tuning, 'Many Universe' Theories, and the Goodness of Life.
    This volume addresses the role value judgments play in science. It is my contention that a particular research programme in modern physical cosmology rests crucially on a value judgment. Before making my case, let me introduce the following abbreviations for the following propositions.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Neil A. Manson (2014). Response to “Animal Interrupted”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (S1):134-139.
    Strong conventionalism goes wrong well before cases of transfiguration even arise. Assuming it is a “rock-bottom” form of conventionalism, it cannot deliver on its promise to resolve the classic transporter case. In the classic transporter case, the transported individual is not specified as being a member of any person-determining community, and so there is no fact of the matter whether the transported individual survives.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Neil A. Manson (2013). The Design Argument and Natural Theology. In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up. 295.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Neil A. Manson (2012). Anthropocentrism, Exoplanets, and the Cosmic Perspective. Environmental Ethics 34 (3):275-290.
    Nonanthropocentric environmental philosophy is a response to two kinds of anthropocentrism: personal anthropocentrism, according to which being human involves the possession of some or all of a set of properties typical of persons, and biological anthropocentrism, according to which being a human involves being a member of the species Homo sapiens. Nonanthropocentric environmental philosophy itself becomes problematic when it is viewed in terms of two arguments that it often seems to imply: the “Planetary Perspective Argument,” which rejects both forms of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Neil A. Manson (2009). The Fine-Tuning Argument. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):271-286.
    The Fine-Tuning Argument (FTA) is a variant of the Design Argument for the existence of God. In this paper the evidence of fine-tuning is explained and the Fine-Tuning Design Argument for God is presented. Then two objections are covered. The first objection is that fine-tuning can be explained in terms of the existence of multiple universes (the 'multiverse') plus the operation of the anthropic principle. The second objection is the 'normalizability problem'– the objection that the Fine-Tuning Argument fails because fine-tuning (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Neil A. Manson (2009). The 'Why Design?' Question. In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan. 68.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Neil A. Manson (2007). Why Shouldn't Insurance Companies Know Your Genetic Information? Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):345-356.
    In this paper I state and reject two of the most commonly given arguments for regulating access by insurance companies to the results of genetic tests. I then argue that since we cannot assume a priori that those genetically predisposed to disease will have worse health outcomes than those not so disposed, we cannot know a priori that genetic discrimination will emerge as a major problem in a free market health insurance system. Finally, I explore the possibility of a free-market (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Neil A. Manson (2005). God and Time. Philosophical Books 46 (1):66-70.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Neil A. Manson (2004). John Leslie Infinite Minds (Clarendon Press: Oxford, 2001). Pp. X+234. £27.50 (Hbk), £14.99 (Pbk). ISBN 0 19 924892 3 (Hbk), 0 19 924893 1 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 40 (4):499-502.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Neil A. Manson (2004). Review of Niall Shanks, God, the Devil, and Darwin: A Critique of Intelligent Design Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (5).
    In this book Niall Shanks aims to debunk thoroughly “intelligent design theory” (henceforth IDT). The aim of proponents of IDT, Shanks warns us (p. xi), “is to insinuate into public consciousness a new version of science – supernatural science – in which the God of Christianity (carefully not directly mentioned for legal and political reasons) is portrayed as the intelligent designer of the universe and its contents.” He thinks the answer to the two basic questions about IDT – “Is intelligent (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Neil A. Manson (ed.) (2003). God and Design: The Teleological Argument and Modern Science. Routledge.
    Recent discoveries in physics, cosmology and biochemistry have captured the public imagination and made the Design Argument - the theory that God created the world according to a specific plan - the object of renewed scientific and philosophical interest. This accessible but serious introduction to the design problem brings together new perspectives from prominent scientists and philosophers including Paul Davies, Richard Swinburne, Sir Martin Rees, Michael Behe, Elliot Sober and Peter van Inwagen.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Neil A. Manson (2003). Universe'theories and the Goodness of Life. In Willem B. Drees (ed.), Is Nature Ever Evil?: Religion, Science, and Value. Routledge. 100--139.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Neil A. Manson (2002). Formulating the Precautionary Principle. Environmental Ethics 24 (3):263-274.
    In part one, I identify the core logical structure of the precautionary principle and distinguish it from the various key concepts that appear in the many different formulations of the principle. I survey these concepts and suggest a program of further conceptual analysis. In part two, I examine a particular version of the precautionary principle dubbed “the catastrophe principle” and criticize it in light of its similarities to the principle at work in Pascal’s Wager. I conclude with some suggestions for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Neil A. Manson (2000). Anthropocentrism and the Design Argument. Religious Studies 36 (2):163-176.
    The design argument for the existence of God is often criticized for resting on anthropocentrism. Some critics maintain that anthropocentrism explains the origin of the design argument. Such critics commit the genetic fallacy. Others say anthropocentrism explains the appeal of the belief that human beings are ends especially worthy of creation. They fail to appreciate that the design argument need not be framed in terms of the fitness of the universe for humanity. Lastly, some say the design argument requires a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Neil A. Manson (2000). There is No Adequate Definition of ?Fine-Tuned for Life? Inquiry 43 (3):341 – 351.
    The discovery that the universe is fine-tuned for life ? a discovery to which the phrase ?the anthropic principle? is often applied ? has prompted much extra-cosmic speculation by philosophers, theologians, and theoretical physicists. Such speculation is referred to as extra-cosmic because an inference is made to the existence either of one unobservable entity that is distinct from the cosmos and any of its parts (God) or of many such entities (multiple universes). In this article a case is mounted for (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation