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Neil Pickering [17]Neil John Pickering [1]
  1. Neil Pickering & Hugh Upton (forthcoming). David Greaves, Martyn Evans, Derek Morgan. Regional Developments in Bioethics.
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  2. Neil Pickering (2014). A Random Blend: The Self in Philip Larkin's Poems “Ambulances” and “The Building”. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):163-170.
    In two of his great poems, “Ambulances” and “The Building,” Philip Larkin considers a deep fear about human individuality. The fear is that the human self is contingent and disjunctive, lacking any integrity or unity. The arrival of an ambulance on an urban curb and a visit to the hospital are the occasion of reflection on this form of human fragility. But more significant, the ambulance and the hospital are imagined as contexts in which the contingency of the human individual (...)
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  3. Neil Pickering (2014). Coercive Care Rights, Law and Policy Ed. By Bernadette McSherry, Ian Freckleton. Asian Bioethics Review 6 (3):320-324.
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  4. Neil Pickering (2013). Conclusion. Asian Bioethics Review 5 (3):222-223.
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  5. Neil Pickering (2013). Covert Treatment of Violent Patients. Asian Bioethics Review 5 (3):198-202.
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  6. Neil Pickering (2013). Ethics Commentary. Asian Bioethics Review 5 (3):245-249.
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  7. Neil Pickering (2013). Extending Disorder: Essentialism, Family Resemblance and Secondary Sense. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):185-195.
    It is commonly thought that mental disorder is a valid concept only in so far as it is an extension of or continuous with the concept of physical disorder. A valid extension has to meet two criteria: determination and coherence. Essentialists meet these criteria through necessary and sufficient conditions for being a disorder. Two Wittgensteinian alternatives to essentialism are considered and assessed against the two criteria. These are the family resemblance approach and the secondary sense approach. Where the focus is (...)
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  8. Neil John Pickering (2013). Doubting Thomas. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):658-659.
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  9. Neil Pickering (2010). Who's a Quack? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (1):43-52.
    Are there any characteristics by which we can reliably identify and distinguish quackery from genuine medicine? A commonly offered criterion for the distinction between medicine and quackery is science: genuine medicine is scientific; quackery is non-scientific. But it proves to be the case that at the boundary of science and non-science, there is an entanglement of considerations. Two cases are considered: that of homoeopathy and that of the Quantum Booster. In the first case, the degree to which reported phenomena that (...)
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  10. Neil Pickering (2009). Take Your Pick. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):349-351.
  11. Neil Pickering (2006). The Metaphor of Mental Illness. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : the existence of mental illness -- The likeness argument -- The categorical argument -- Metaphor -- Two metaphors from physical medicine -- The metaphor of mental illness -- Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, social construction, and metaphor -- Metaphors and models.
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  12. Douglas McConnell & Neil Pickering (2005). Clinical Practice, Science, and the Unconscious. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (1):1-7.
  13. Neil Pickering (2005). Call for Responses. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (3):183-183.
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  14. Neil Pickering (2003). The Likeness Argument and the Reality of Mental Illness. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (3):243-254.
  15. Neil Pickering (2003). The Likeness Argument: Reminders, Roles, and Reasons for Use. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (3):273-275.
  16. Neil Pickering, Ken Daniels, Andrew Moore, Warren Brookbanks, John Adams, Shayne Grice, David B. Menkes, Alan A. Woodall & David Woolner (2000). A/Ew Zealand Bioethics Journal. New Zealand Bioethics Journal 1:1.
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  17. Neil Pickering (1999). Metaphors and Models in Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (4):361-375.
    This paper aims to show how medical scientists may use metaphor in ways closely parallel to poets. Those who believe metaphor has any role at all in science may describe its use in various ways. Associationists think metaphors are based upon likenesses, and collapse the notions of model and metaphor together. But, as an example from the work of Louis Pasteur suggests, metaphor need not be based upon likenesses. Rather it may play a role in making possible a model'sexplanatory significance. (...)
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  18. Neil Pickering & Paul Billings (1993). Not My Problem. Hastings Center Report 23 (1):45-46.
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