18 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Neil Sinhababu (National University of Singapore)
  1. Neil Sinhababu, Ethical Reductionism.
    I argue that ethical reductionism is better than nonreductionism at fitting moral properties into successful scientific explanations and doesn't face the kind of multiple realizability that threatens reductionism in philosophy of mind.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Neil Sinhababu, Fine-Tuning and Psychophysical Laws.
    I present a novel objection to fine-tuning arguments for God's existence: the metaphysical possibility of different psychophysical laws allows any values of the physical constants to support intelligent life forms, like protons and electrons in love.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Neil Sinhababu, The Epistemic Argument for Hedonism.
    I defend hedonism about moral value by first presenting an argument for moral skepticism, and then showing that phenomenal introspection gives us a unique way to defeat the skeptical argument and establish pleasure's goodness.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Neil Sinhababu, Zarathustra's Metaethics.
    Focusing mainly on Thus Spoke Zarathustra, I argue that Nietzsche is an error theorist about existing moral discourse who encourages us to pursue a kind of subjective nonmoral value arising from our passions.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Neil Sinhababu (forthcoming). Advantages of Propositionalism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    Propositionalism is the view that the contents of intentional attitudes have a propositional structure. Objectualism opposes propositionalism in allowing the contents of these attitudes to be ordinary objects or properties. Philosophers including Talbot Brewer, Paul Thagard, Michelle Montague, and Alex Grzankowski attack propositionalism about such attitudes as desire, liking, and fearing. This paper defends propositionalism, mainly on grounds that it better supports psychological explanations.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Neil Sinhababu (2014). Janaway , Christopher , and Robertson , Simon , Eds. Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Normativity . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. 280. $75.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (3):617-622.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Neil Sinhababu (2013). Distinguishing Belief and Imagination. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):152-165.
    Some philosophers (including Urmson, Humberstone, Shah, and Velleman) hold that believing that p distinctively involves applying a norm according to which the truth of p is a criterion for the success or correctness of the attitude. On this view, imagining and assuming differ from believing in that no such norm is applied. I argue against this view with counterexamples showing that applying the norm of truth is neither necessary nor sufficient for distinguishing believing from imagining and assuming. Then I argue (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Neil Sinhababu (2013). The Desire‐Belief Account of Intention Explains Everything. Noûs 47 (4):680-696.
    I argue that one intends that ϕ if one has a desire that ϕ and an appropriately related means-end belief. Opponents, including Setiya and Bratman, charge that this view can't explain three things. First, intentional action is accompanied by knowledge of what we are doing. Second, we can choose our reasons for action. Third, forming an intention settles a deliberative question about what to do, disposing us to cease deliberating about it. I show how the desire-belief view can explain why (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Neil Sinhababu (2013). Unequal Vividness and Double Effect. Utilitas 25 (3):291-315.
    I argue that the Doctrine of Double Effect is accepted because of unreliable processes of belief-formation, making it unacceptably likely to be mistaken. We accept the doctrine because we more vividly imagine intended consequences of our actions than merely foreseen ones, making our aversions to the intended harms more violent, and making us judge that producing the intended harms is morally worse. This explanation fits psychological evidence from Schnall and others, and recent neuroscientific research from Greene, Klein, Kahane, and Schaich (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Neil Sinhababu (2012). Sneddon , Andrew . Like-Minded: Externalism and Moral Psychology . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2011. Pp. 282. [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (4):824-829.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Neil Sinhababu (2011). The Humean Theory of Practical Irrationality. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 6 (1):1-13.
    Christine Korsgaard has argued that Humean views about action and practical rationality jointly imply the impossibility of irrational action. According to the Humean theory of action, agents do what maximizes expected desire-satisfaction. According to the Humean theory of rationality, it is rational for agents to do what maximizes expected desire-satisfaction. Thus Humeans are committed to the impossibility of practical irrationality – an unacceptable consequence. -/- I respond by developing Humean views to explain how we can act irrationally. Humeans about action (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Neil Sinhababu (2010). Review of Robert Pippin, Nietzsche, Psychology, and First Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (9).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Neil Sinhababu (2009). Review of James Luchte (Ed.), Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra: Before Sunrise. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Neil Sinhababu (2009). The Humean Theory of Motivation Reformulated and Defended. Philosophical Review 118 (4):465-500.
    This essay defends a strong version of the Humean theory of motivation on which desire is necessary both for motivation and for reasoning that changes our desires. Those who hold that moral judgments are beliefs with intrinsic motivational force need to oppose this view, and many of them have proposed counterexamples to it. Using a novel account of desire, this essay handles the proposed counterexamples in a way that shows the superiority of the Humean theory. The essay addresses the classic (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Neil Sinhababu (2008). Possible Girls. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (2):254–260.
    I argue that if David Lewis’ modal realism is true, modal realists from different possible worlds can fall in love with each other. I offer a method for uniquely picking out possible people who are in love with us and not with our counterparts. Impossible lovers and trans-world love letters are considered. Anticipating objections, I argue that we can stand in the right kinds of relations to merely possible people to be in love with them and that ending a trans-world (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (2007). Introduction. In Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.), Nietzsche and Morality. Oxford University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.) (2007). Nietzsche and Morality. Oxford University Press.
    This volume capitalizes on a growth of interest in Nietzsche's work on morality from two sides -- from scholars of the history of philosophy and from ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Neil Sinhababu (2007). Vengeful Thinking and Moral Epistemology. In Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.), Nietzsche and Morality. Oxford University Press. 262.