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  1. Julie A. Nelson, Sociology, Economics, and Gender: Can Knowledge of the Past Contribute to a Better Future?
    This essay explores the profoundly gendered nature of the split between the disciplines of economics and sociology which took place in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, emphasizing implications for the relatively new field of economic sociology. Drawing on historical documents and feminist studies of science, it investigates the gendered processes underlying the divergence of the disciplines in definition, method, and degree of engagement with social problems. Economic sociology has the potential to heal this disciplinary split, but only if (...)
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  2. Julie A. Nelson, Economists, Value Judgments, and Climate Change: A View From Feminist Economics.
    A number of recent discussions about ethical issues in climate change, as engaged in by economists, have focused on the value of the parameter representing the rate of time preference within models of optimal growth. This essay examines many economists' antipathy to serious discussion of ethical matters, and suggests that the avoidance of questions of intergenerational equity is related to another set of value judgments concerning the quality and objectivity of economic practice. Using insights from feminist philosophy of science and (...)
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  3. Keith D. Farnsworth, John Nelson & Carlos Gershenson (forthcoming). Living is Information Processing: From Molecules to Global Systems. Acta Biotheoretica.
    We extend the concept that life is an informational phenomenon, at every level of organisation, from molecules to the global ecological system. According to this thesis: (a) living is information processing, in which memory is maintained by both molecular states and ecological states as well as the more obvious nucleic acid coding; (b) this information processing has one overall function—to perpetuate itself; and (c) the processing method is filtration (cognition) of, and synthesis of, information at lower levels to appear at (...)
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  4. Donald W. Light & James Lindemann Nelson (forthcoming). Moral Teachings From the Social Sciences. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  5. Jackie A. Nelson & Nicole B. Perry (forthcoming). Emotional Reactivity, Self-Control and Children's Hostile Attributions Over Middle Childhood. Cognition and Emotion:1-12.
  6. James Lindemann Nelson (forthcoming). Another Voice: Love's Burdens. Hastings Center Report.
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  7. John Nelson (forthcoming). Household Altars in Contemporary Japan: Rectifying Buddhist" Ancestor Worship" with Home Décor and Consumer Choice. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.
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  8. John K. Nelson (forthcoming). Freedom of Expression: The Very Modern Practice of Visiting a Shinto Shrine. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.
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  9. Julie A. Nelson (forthcoming). A Picture of Gender. Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy.
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  10. Richard E. Sparks, John C. Nelson & Yao Yin (forthcoming). Naturalization of the Flood Regime in Regulated Rivers. BioScience.
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  11. Hilde Lindemann & James Lindemann Nelson (2014). The Surrogate's Authority. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):161-168.
    The authority of surrogates—often close family members—to make treatment decisions for previously capacitated patients is said to come from their knowledge of the patient, which they are to draw on as they exercise substituted judgment on the patient’s behalf. However, proxy accuracy studies call this authority into question, hence the Patient Preference Predictor (PPP). We identify two problems with contemporary understandings of the surrogate’s role. The first is with the assumption that knowledge of the patient entails knowledge of what the (...)
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  12. James Lindemann Nelson (2014). Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on turning (...)
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  13. Jonathan D. Nelson, Bojana Divjak, Gudny Gudmundsdottir, Laura F. Martignon & Björn Meder (2014). Children's Sequential Information Search is Sensitive to Environmental Probabilities. Cognition 130 (1):74-80.
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  14. Julie A. Nelson (2014). The Power of Stereotyping and Confirmation Bias to Overwhelm Accurate Assessment: The Case of Economics, Gender, and Risk Aversion. Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (3):211-231.
    Behavioral research has revealed how normal human cognitive processes can tend to lead us astray. But do these affect economic researchers, ourselves? This article explores the consequences of stereotyping and confirmation bias using a sample of published articles from the economics literature on gender and risk aversion. The results demonstrate that the supposedly ?robust? claim that ?women are more risk averse than men? is far less empirically supported than has been claimed. The questions of how these cognitive biases arise and (...)
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  15. J. Benjamin Hinnant, Jackie A. Nelson, Marion O'Brien, Susan P. Keane & Susan D. Calkins (2013). The Interactive Roles of Parenting, Emotion Regulation and Executive Functioning in Moral Reasoning During Middle Childhood. Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1460-1468.
  16. James Lindemann Nelson (2013). Just Caring for the Elderly: A Utopian Fantasy? Thoughts Prompted by Martha Holstein. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):36-40.
    Midway in Martha Holstein’s article, these words occur: “[P]eople [should] get the help they need, when they need it, in the way that they would like to receive it, without exploiting family members or imperiling their dignity or self-respect” (24). In an essay that brims over with worrisome news, that this seemingly anodyne sentence appears in the section devoted to utopian thinking is perhaps the most dispiriting thought it conveys. Not that there isn’t keen competition for the role. Holstein reminds (...)
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  17. James Lindemann Nelson (2013). “Yet the Body Is His Book”: Plastinated Bodies and the Book of Common Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 43 (3):46-47.
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  18. James Lindemann Nelson (2012). Quality of Care: A Preface. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):237-242.
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  19. James Lindemann Nelson (2012). Still Quiet After All These Years. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (3):249-259.
    Some 14 years ago, I published an article in which I identified a prime site for bioethicists to ply their trade: medical responses to requests for hormonal and surgical interventions aimed at facilitating transgendered people’s transition to their desired genders. Deep issues about the impact of biotechnologies and health care practices on central aspects of our conceptual system, I argued, were raised by how doctors understood and responded to people seeking medical assistance in changing their gender, and there were obviously (...)
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  20. Terrie Epstein, Edwin Mayorga & Joseph Nelson (2011). Teaching About Race in an Urban History Class: The Effects of Culturally Responsive Teaching. Journal of Social Studies Research 35 (1):2-21.
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  21. Donna Jeffery & Jennifer Nelson (2011). 'What Are We To Do About Difference?': Race, Culture and the Ethical Encounter. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (3):247-265.
    This paper is based on the findings from a study in which social workers in healthcare settings were asked for their perspectives on cultural and racial difference as these apply to their practice with racialized clients. In examining the varied practice philosophies and approaches they employ, we find that older practice models based on problematized knowledge about racialized Others are being, alternately, reinstated and contested. In grappling with how to practise, participants describe approaches that, in many cases, effectively individualize clients (...)
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  22. James B. Nelson & Donald Scherer (2011). A Theology for Radical Politics, Michael Novak. World Futures 11 (sup1):47-58.
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  23. James Lindemann Nelson (2011). Hurts, Insults and Stigmas: A Comment on Murphy. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):66-67.
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  24. James Lindemann Nelson (2011). Internal Organs, Integral Selves, and Good Communities: Opt-Out Organ Procurement Policies and the 'Separateness of Persons'. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (5):289-300.
    Most people accept that if they can save someone from death at very little cost to themselves, they must do so; call this the ‘duty of easy rescue.’ At least for many such people, an instance of this duty is to allow their vital organs to be used for transplantation. Accordingly, ‘opt-out’ organ procurement policies, based on a powerfully motivated responsibility to render costless or very low-cost lifesaving aid, would seem presumptively permissible. Counterarguments abound. Here I consider, in particular, objections (...)
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  25. James Lindemann Nelson (2011). Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy, and Politics (Review). International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):237-241.
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  26. James Lindemann Nelson (2011). Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy, and Politics. Edited by Jonathan D. Moreno and Sam Berger. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):237-241.
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  27. Marion O'Brien, Jennifer Miner Weaver, Jackie A. Nelson, Susan D. Calkins, Esther M. Leerkes & Stuart Marcovitch (2011). Longitudinal Associations Between Children's Understanding of Emotions and Theory of Mind. Cognition and Emotion 25 (6):1074-1086.
  28. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). Book Reviews: Morality and Our Complicated Form of Life: Feminist Wittgensteinian Metaethics. By Peg O'Connor. [REVIEW] Hypatia 25 (1):242-244.
  29. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). Donation by Default? Examining Feminist Reservations About Opt-Out Organ Procurement. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1):23-42.
    During 2006, a total of 130,527 Americans spent time on organ waiting lists; 7,191 of them died waiting. According to the U.S. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, 104,778 people are awaiting organs as this is being written (www.optn.org/data/; accessed November 4, 2009); every ninety minutes or so, one of them will die.In Spain, however, waiting list time is much shorter, and accordingly, very few die for the want of an organ; roughly thirty-five people per million provide organs in Spain upon (...)
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  30. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). How Catherine Does Go On: Northanger Abbey and Moral Thought. Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 188-200.
    A certain pupil with the vaguely Kafkaesque name B has mastered the series of natural numbers. B's new task is to learn how to write down other series of cardinal numbers and right now, we're working on the series "+2." After a bit, B seems to catch on, but we are unusually thorough teachers and keep him at it. Things are going just fine until he reaches 1000. Then, quite confounding us, he writes 1004, 1008, 1012."We say to him: 'Look (...)
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  31. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). Semantic Externalism: A Rough Sketch and a Gesture at Motivation The 1960s and 70s Saw the Development of a Picture of Reference in Which the Link Between the Speaker and the Spoken of Was Provided Not, or Not Solely, by Beliefs Entertained by the Speaker but by Causal, Historical, and Social Relationships Extending Among the Speaker and Other Members Of. [REVIEW] In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  32. James Lindemann Nelson (2010). Trusting Families: Responding to Mary Ann Meeker," Responsive Care Management: Family Decision Makers in Advanced Cancer". Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (2):123-127.
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  33. Julie A. Nelson (2010). Economic Writing on the Pressing Problems of the Day: The Roles of Moral Intuition and Methodological Confusion. Revue de Philosophie Économique 11 (2):37.
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  34. Jeff Broome & John O. Nelson (2009). Hume's 'New Scene of Thought' and the Several Faces of David Hume in the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. University Press of America.
     
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  35. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Alzheimer's Disease and Socially Extended Mentation. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):462-474.
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  36. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Beyond Moral Judgment. By Alice Crary. Hypatia 24 (1):181-185.
  37. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Berger on Burdens. Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (2):162.
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  38. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Dealing Death and Retrieving Organs. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):285-291.
    It has recently been argued by Miller and Truog (2008) that, while procuring vital organs from transplant donors is typically the cause of their deaths, this violation of the requirement that donors be dead prior to the removal of their organs is not a cause for moral concern. In general terms, I endorse this heterodox conclusion, but for different and, as I think, more powerful reasons. I end by arguing that, even if it is agreed that retrieval of vital organs (...)
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  39. James Lindemann Nelson (2009). Hypotheticals, Analogies, Death's Harms, and Organ Procurement. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):14-16.
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  40. Jonathan D. Nelson (2009). Naïve Optimality: Subjects' Heuristics Can Be Better Motivated Than Experimenters' Optimal Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):94-95.
    Is human cognition best described by optimal models, or by adaptive but suboptimal heuristic strategies? It is frequently hard to identify which theoretical model is normatively best justified. In the context of information search, naoptimal” models.
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  41. Julie A. Nelson (2009). A Response to Bruni and Sugden. Economics and Philosophy 25 (2):187-193.
    An article by Luigino Bruni and Robert Sugden published in this journal argues that market relations contain elements of what they call . This Response demonstrates that my own views on interpersonal relations and markets are far closer to Bruni and Sugden's than they acknowledge in their article, and goes on to discuss additional important dimensions of sociality that they neglect.
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  42. Julie A. Nelson (2009). Ethics, Evidence and International Debt. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):175-189.
    The assumption that contracts are largely impersonal, rational, voluntary agreements drawn up between self-interested individual agents is a convenient fiction, necessary for analysis using conventional economic methods. Papers prepared for a recent conference on ethics and international debt were shaped by just such an assumption. The adequacy of this approach is, however, challenged by evidence about who is affected by international debt, how contracts are actually made and followed, the behavior of actors in financial markets, and the motivations of scholars (...)
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  43. Lynn Hankinson Nelson & Jack Nelson (2009). How Knowers Emerge and Why This is Important to Future Work in Naturalized Epistemology. In John R. Shook & Paul Kurtz (eds.), The Future of Naturalism. Humanity Books.
     
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  44. Jennifer Yardley, Melanie Domenech Rodríguez, Scott C. Bates & Johnathan Nelson (2009). True Confessions?: Alumni's Retrospective Reports on Undergraduate Cheating Behaviors. Ethics and Behavior 19 (1):1-14.
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  45. Kathleen Thiede Call, Gestur Davidson, Michael Davern, E. Richard Brown, Jennifer Kincheloe & Justine G. Nelson (2008). Accuracy in Self-Reported Health Insurance Coverage Among Medicaid Enrollees. Inquiry 45 (4):438-456.
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  46. F. Stuart Chapin Iii, Sarah F. Trainor, Orville Huntington, Amy L. Lovecraft, Erika Zavaleta, David C. Natcher, A. David McGuire, Joanna L. Nelson, Lily Ray & Monika Calef (2008). Increasing Wildfire in Alaska's Boreal Forest: Pathways to Potential Solutions of a Wicked Problem. BioScience 58 (6):531-540.
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  47. F. Stuart Chapin, Sarah F. Trainor, Orville Huntington, Amy L. Lovecraft, Erika Zavaleta, David C. Natcher, A. David McGuire, Joanna L. Nelson, Lily Ray, Monika Calef, Nancy Fresco, Henry Huntington, T. Scott Rupp, La'ona DeWilde & Rosamond L. Naylor (2008). Increasing Wildfire in Alaska's Boreal Forest: Pathways to Potential Solutions of a Wicked Problem. BioScience 58 (6):531.
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  48. Hilde Lindemann & James Lindemann Nelson (2008). The Romance of the Family. Hastings Center Report 38 (4):19-21.
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  49. J. L. Nelson (2008). Medicine and the Market: Equity Vs. Choice by Daniel Callahan and Angela A. Wasunna. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):474.
     
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  50. James Lindemann Nelson (2008). Respecting Boundaries, Disparaging Values. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):33 – 34.
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