You are accessing PhilPapers from Open University (UK), an institution that is not subscribed to PhilPapers. Starting on July 1, 2014, we ask institutions that grant philosophy degrees and are based in high-GDP countries to contribute to PhilPapers' maintenance and development through a subscription. See this page for details. Please show your support by contacting your librarian.

Search results for 'Neo-Fregean theory of reference' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Mark Balaguer (2011). Is There a Fact of the Matter Between Direct Reference Theory and (Neo-)Fregeanism? Philosophical Studies 154 (1):53-78.score: 1152.0
    It is argued here that there is no fact of the matter between direct reference theory and neo-Fregeanism. To get a more precise idea of the central thesis of this paper, consider the following two claims: (i) While direct reference theory and neo-Fregeanism can be developed in numerous ways, they can be developed in essentially parallel ways; that is, for any (plausible) way of developing direct reference theory, there is an essentially parallel way of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Pieranna Garavaso (2001). Why the New Theorist May Still Need to Explain Cognitive Significance but Not Mind Doing It. Philosophia 28 (1-4):455-465.score: 952.0
    In "Has Semantics Rested on a Mistake?", Howard Wettstein denies that semantics must account for cognitive significance. He thus rejects Frege's condition of adequacy for semantics and rids the new theorists from seemingly intractable puzzles. In a more recent article, Wettstein claims that not only reference but even cognitive significance is not a matter of how the referent is presented to the mind of the speaker. In this paper, I submit that the crucial element in the debate between new (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Christian Beyer (2001). A Neo-Husserlian Theory of Speaker's Reference. Erkenntnis 54 (3):277-297.score: 794.4
    It is not well known that in his Göttingen period (1900–1916) Edmund Husserl developed a kind of direct reference theory, anticipating,among other things, the distinction between referential and attributive use of adefinite description, which was rediscovered by Keith Donnellan in 1966 and further analysed by Saul Kripke in 1977. This paper defends the claim that Husserl''s idea of the mental act given voice to in an utterance sheds new light on that distinction and particularly on cases where semantic (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Daniel Kolak (2008). Room for a View: On the Metaphysical Subject of Personal Identity. Synthese 162 (3):341 - 372.score: 546.0
    Sydney Shoemaker leads today’s “neo-Lockean” liberation of persons from the conservative animalist charge of “neo-Aristotelians” such as Eric Olson, according to whom persons are biological entities and who challenge all neo-Lockean views on grounds that abstracting from strictly physical, or bodily, criteria plays fast and loose with our identities. There is a fundamental mistake on both sides: a false dichotomy between bodily continuity versus psychological continuity theories of personal identity. Neo-Lockeans, like everyone else today who relies on Locke’s analysis of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Kirk Ludwig (1992). Brains in a Vat, Subjectivity, and the Causal Theory of Reference. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:313-345.score: 527.4
    This paper evaluates Putnam’s argument in the first chapter of Reason, Truth and History, for the claim that we can know that we are not brains in a vat (of a certain sort). A widespread response to Putnam’s argument has been that if it were successful not only the world but the meanings of our words (and consequently our thoughts) would be beyond the pale of knowledge, because a causal theory of reference is not compatible with our having (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jussi Jylkkä (2008). Concepts and Reference: Defending a Dual Theory of Natural Kind Concepts. Dissertation, University of Turkuscore: 511.2
    In this thesis I argue that the psychological study of concepts and categorisation, and the philosophical study of reference are deeply intertwined. I propose that semantic intuitions are a variety of categorisation judgements, determined by concepts, and that because of this, concepts determine reference. I defend a dual theory of natural kind concepts, according to which natural kind concepts have distinct semantic cores and non-semantic identification procedures. Drawing on psychological essentialism, I suggest that the cores consist of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Steffen Lewitzka (2009). $\in_I$ : An Intuitionistic Logic Without Fregean Axiom and with Predicates for Truth and Falsity. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 50 (3):275-301.score: 470.4
    We present $\in_I$-Logic (Epsilon-I-Logic), a non-Fregean intuitionistic logic with a truth predicate and a falsity predicate as intuitionistic negation. $\in_I$ is an extension and intuitionistic generalization of the classical logic $\in_T$ (without quantifiers) designed by Sträter as a theory of truth with propositional self-reference. The intensional semantics of $\in_T$ offers a new solution to semantic paradoxes. In the present paper we introduce an intuitionistic semantics and study some semantic notions in this broader context. Also we enrich the quantifier-free (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. P. Schlenker (2007). The Elimination of Self-Reference: Generalized Yablo-Series and the Theory of Truth. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (3):251 - 307.score: 468.0
    Although it was traditionally thought that self-reference is a crucial ingredient of semantic paradoxes, Yablo (1993, 2004) showed that this was not so by displaying an infinite series of sentences none of which is self-referential but which, taken together, are paradoxical. Yablo's paradox consists of a countable series of linearly ordered sentences s(0), s(1), s(2),... , where each s(i) says: For each k > i, s(k) is false (or equivalently: For no k > i is s(k) true). We generalize (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. John Michael & Miles Macleod (2013). Applying the Causal Theory of Reference to Intentional Concepts. Philosophy of Science 80 (2):212-230.score: 441.0
  10. Brendan Lalor (1997). Rethinking Kaplan's ''Afterthoughts'' About 'That': An Exorcism of Semantical Demons. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 47 (1):67-87.score: 432.0
    Kaplan (1977) proposes a neo-Fregean theory of demonstratives which, despite its departure from a certain problematic Fregean thesis, I argue, ultimately founders on account of its failure to give up the Fregean desideratum of a semantic theory that it provide an account of cognitive significance. I explain why Kaplan's (1989) afterthoughts don't remedy this defect. Finally, I sketch an alternative nonsolipsistic picture of demonstrative reference which idealizes away from an agent's narrowly characterizable psychological state, and instead (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Bob Hale (ed.) (2001). The Reason's Proper Study: Essays Towards a Neo-Fregean Philosophy of Mathematics. Oxford University Press.score: 420.0
    Here, Bob Hale and Crispin Wright assemble the key writings that lead to their distinctive neo-Fregean approach to the philosophy of mathematics. In addition to fourteen previously published papers, the volume features a new paper on the Julius Caesar problem; a substantial new introduction mapping out the program and the contributions made to it by the various papers; a section explaining which issues most require further attention; and bibliographies of references and further useful sources. It will be recognized as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jussi Jylkkä (2008). Theories of Natural Kind Term Reference and Empirical Psychology. Philosophical Studies 139 (2):153-169.score: 414.0
    In this paper, I argue that the causal and description theories of natural kind term reference involve certain psychological elements. My main goal is to refine these theories with the help of empirical psychology of concepts, and to argue that the refinement process ultimately leads to the dissolution of boundaries between the two kinds of theories. However, neither the refined theories nor any other existing theories provide an adequate answer to the question of what makes natural kind terms rigid. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Saul A. Kripke (2008). Frege's Theory of Sense and Reference: Some Exegetical Notes. Theoria 74 (3):181-218.score: 410.4
    Frege's theory of indirect contexts and the shift of sense and reference in these contexts has puzzled many. What can the hierarchy of indirect senses, doubly indirect senses, and so on, be? Donald Davidson gave a well-known 'unlearnability' argument against Frege's theory. The present paper argues that the key to Frege's theory lies in the fact that whenever a reference is specified (even though many senses determine a single reference), it is specified in a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Bob Hale (2005). Real Numbers and Set Theory – Extending the Neo-Fregean Programme Beyond Arithmetic. Synthese 147 (1):21 - 41.score: 386.4
    It is known that Hume’s Principle, adjoined to a suitable formulation of second-order logic, gives a theory which is almost certainly consistent4 and suffices for arithmetic in the sense that it yields the Dedekind-Peano axioms as theorems. While Hume’s Principle cannot be taken as a definition in any strict sense requiring that it provide for the eliminative paraphrase of its definiendum in every admissible type of occurrence, we hold that it can be viewed as an implicit definition of a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Arvid Båve (2009). A Deflationary Theory of Reference. Synthese 169 (1):51 - 73.score: 381.6
    The article first rehearses three deflationary theories of reference, (1) disquotationalism, (2) propositionalism (Horwich), and (3) the anaphoric theory (Brandom), and raises a number of objections against them. It turns out that each corresponds to a closely related theory of truth, and that these are subject to analogous criticisms to a surprisingly high extent. I then present a theory of my own, according to which the schema “That S(t) is about t” and the biconditional “S refers (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Matti Eklund (2009). Bad Company and Neo-Fregean Philosophy. Synthese 170 (3):393 - 414.score: 381.6
    A central element in neo-Fregean philosophy of mathematics is the focus on abstraction principles, and the use of abstraction principles to ground various areas of mathematics. But as is well known, not all abstraction principles are in good standing. Various proposals for singling out the acceptable abstraction principles have been presented. Here I investigate what philosophical underpinnings can be provided for these proposals; specifically, underpinnings that fit the neo-Fregean's general outlook. Among the philosophical ideas I consider are: general (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2009). Focus Restored: Comments on John MacFarlane. Synthese 170 (3):457 - 482.score: 381.0
    In “Double Vision Two Questions about the Neo-Fregean Programme”, John MacFarlane’s raises two main questions: (1) Why is it so important to neo-Fregeans to treat expressions of the form ‘the number of Fs’ as a species of singular term? What would be lost, if anything, if they were analysed instead as a type of quantifier-phrase, as on Russell’s Theory of Definite Descriptions? and (2) Granting—at least for the sake of argument—that Hume’s Principle may be used as a means (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Michael Salter (1999). Neo-Fascist Legal Theory on Trial: An Interpretation of Carl Schmitt's Defence at Nuremberg From the Perspective of Franz Neumann's Critical Theory of Law. Res Publica 5 (2):161-193.score: 372.6
    This article addresses, from a Frankfurt School perspective on law identified with Franz Neumann and more recently Habermas, the attack upon the principles of war criminality formulated at the Nuremberg trials by the increasingly influential legal and political theory of Carl Schmitt. It also considers the contradictions within certain of the defence arguments that Schmitt himself resorted to when interrogated as a possible war crimes defendant at Nuremberg. The overall argument is that a distinctly internal, or “immanent”, form of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Wim Dubbink & Luc van Liedekerke (2009). A Neo-Kantian Foundation of Corporate Social Responsibility. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):117 - 136.score: 370.8
    ‘Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is conceptualized in many ways. We argue that one cannot be indifferent about the issue of its conceptualization. In terms of methodology, our position is that any conceptual discussion must embed CSR in political theory. With regard to substance, we link up with the discussion on whether CSR must be defined on the basis of a tripartite or a quadripartite division of business responsibilities. We share A.B. Carroll’s intuition that a quadripartite division is called for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Crispin Wright (2000). Neo-Fregean Foundations for Real Analysis: Some Reflections on Frege's Constraint. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 41 (4):317--334.score: 369.6
    We now know of a number of ways of developing real analysis on a basis of abstraction principles and second-order logic. One, outlined by Shapiro in his contribution to this volume, mimics Dedekind in identifying the reals with cuts in the series of rationals under their natural order. The result is an essentially structuralist conception of the reals. An earlier approach, developed by Hale in his "Reals byion" program differs by placing additional emphasis upon what I here term Frege's Constraint, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Barry Smith (1994). Husserl’s Theory of Meaning and Reference. In L. Haaparanta (ed.), Mind, Meaning and Mathematics. Essays on the Philosophy of Husserl and Frege. Kluwer.score: 365.4
    This paper is a contribution to the historical roots of the analytical tradition. As Michael Dummett points out in his Origins of Analytic Philosophy, many tendencies in Central European thought contributed to the early development of analytic philosophy. Dummett himself concentrates on just one aspect of this historical complex, namely on the relationship between the theories of meaning and reference developed by Frege and by Husserl in the years around the turn of the century. It is to this specific (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Nick Boreham (2004). A Theory of Collective Competence: Challenging the Neo-Liberal Individualisation of Performance at Work. British Journal of Educational Studies 52 (1):5 - 17.score: 365.4
    Contemporary work-related education and training policy represents occupational competence as the outcome of individual performance at work. This paper presents a critique of this neo-liberal assumption, arguing that in many cases competence should be regarded as an attribute of groups, teams and communities. It proposes a theory of collective competence in terms of (1) making collective sense of events in the workplace, (2) developing and using a collective knowledge base and (3) developing a sense of interdependency. It suggests that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. François Recanati (2012). Mental Files. Oxford University Press.score: 359.0
    Over the past fifty years the philosophy of language and mind has been dominated by a nondescriptivist approach to content and reference. This book attempts to recast and systematize that approach by offering an indexical model in terms of mental files. According to Recanati, we refer through mental files, the function of which is to store information derived through certain types of contextual relation the subject bears to objects in his or her environment. The reference of a file (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Wolfgang Carl (1994). Frege's Theory of Sense and Reference: Its Origins and Scope. Cambridge University Press.score: 356.4
    Gottlob Frege has exerted an enormous influence on the evolution of twentieth-century philosophy, yet the real significance of that influence is still very much a matter of debate. This book provides a completely new and systematic account of Frege's philosophy by focusing on its cornerstone: the theory of sense and reference. Two features distinguish this study from other books on Frege. First, sense and reference are placed absolutely at the core of Frege's work; the author shows that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Alik Pelman (2007). Reference and Modality: A Theory of Intensions. Dissertation, University of London, UCLscore: 356.4
    The study of reference often leads to addressing fundamental issues in semantics, metaphysics and epistemology; this suggests that reference is closely linked to the three realms. The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the structure of some of these links, through a close examination of the “mechanism” of reference. As in many other enquiries, considering the possible (i.e., the modal,) in addition to the actual proves very helpful in clarifying and explicating insights. The reference (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Amanda Seidl (2001). Minimal Indirect Reference: A Theory of the Syntax-Phonology Interface. Routledge.score: 356.4
    This book investigates the nature of the relationship between phonology and syntax and proposes a theory of Minimal Indirect Reference that solves many classic problems relating to the topic. Seidl shows that all variation across languages in phonological domain size is due to syntactic differences and a single domain parameter specific to phonology.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Kevin C. Klement (2014). The Paradoxes and Russell's Theory of Incomplete Symbols. Philosophical Studies 169 (2):183-207.score: 355.2
    Russell claims in his autobiography and elsewhere that he discovered his 1905 theory of descriptions while attempting to solve the logical and semantic paradoxes plaguing his work on the foundations of mathematics. In this paper, I hope to make the connection between his work on the paradoxes and the theory of descriptions and his theory of incomplete symbols generally clearer. In particular, I argue that the theory of descriptions arose from the realization that not only can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Johannes Brandl (1989). What is Wrong with the Building Block Theory of Language? Grazer Philosophische Studien 36:79-95.score: 355.2
    It is argued that Davidson's basic objection to the Building Block Method in semantics is neither that it gives the wrong explanation of how a first language is learned nor that it assigns a meaning to Single words prior to interpreting a whole language. The arguments against Fregean concepts and truth-values as the references of predicates and sentences are found to be equally superficial as the arguments against a primitive notion reference defmed in causal terms.Davidson's basic objection turns out (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Frederick Kroon (2011). Theory-Dependence, Warranted Reference, and the Epistemic Dimensions of Realism. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (2):173-191.score: 354.6
    The question of the role of theory in the determination of reference of theoretical terms continues to be a controversial one. In the present paper I assess a number of responses to this question (including variations on David Lewis’s appeal to Ramsification), before describing an alternative, epistemically oriented account of the reference-determination of such terms. The paper concludes by discussing some implications of the account for our understanding of both realism and such competitors of realism as constructive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Ingo Brigandt (2004). Biological Kinds and the Causal Theory of Reference. In J. C. Marek & M. E. Reicher (eds.), Experience and Analysis: Papers of the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.score: 354.6
    This paper uses an example from biology, the homology concept, to argue that current versions of the causal theory of reference give an incomplete account of reference determination. It is suggested that in addition to samples and stereotypical properties, the scientific use of concepts and the epistemic interests pursued with concepts are important factors in determining the reference of natural kind terms.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen (2010). Kuhn on Essentialism and the Causal Theory of Reference. Philosophy of Science 77 (4):544-564.score: 354.6
    The causal theory of reference is often taken to provide a solution to the problems, such as incomparability and referential discontinuity, that the meaning-change thesis raised. I show that Kuhn successfully questioned the causal theory and Putnam's idea that reference is determined via the sameness relation of essences that holds between a sample and other members of a kind in all possible worlds. Putnam's single ‘essential' properties may be necessary but not sufficient to determine membership in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jc Beall (2001). The New Theory of Reference: Kripke, Marcus, and its Origins. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (2):308 – 309.score: 354.6
    Book Information The New Theory of Reference: Kripke, Marcus, and Its Origins. Edited by Paul Humphreys and James Fetzer. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Boston. Pp. xiii + 290. Hardback, US$105.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Robert Rynasiewicz (1992). Why the New Theory of Reference Does Not Entail Absolute Time and Space. Philosophy of Science 59 (3):508-509.score: 354.6
    I explain why the New Theory of Reference of Marcus, Kripke, Kaplan, Putnam and others does not entail absolute time and space, contrary to what Quentin Smith has recently claimed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Quentin Smith (1991). The New Theory of Reference Entails Absolute Time and Space. Philosophy of Science 58 (3):411-416.score: 354.6
    The New Theory of Reference (NTR) of Marcus, Kripke, Kaplan, Putnam and others is a theory in the philosophy of language and there has been much debate about whether it entails the metaphysical theory of essentialism. But there has been no discussion about whether the NTR entails another metaphysical theory, the absolutist theory of time and space. It is argued in this paper that the NTR carries this entailment; the theory of time is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Howard Sankey (1991). Feyerabend and the Description Theory of Reference. Journal of Philosophical Research 16:223-232.score: 354.6
    In his early work Feyerabend argues that certain theories are incommensurable due to semantic variance. In this paper it is argued that Feyerabend relies on a description theory of reference in the course of his argument for incommensurability and in his analysis of the relevant kind of semantic variance. Against this it is objected that such reliance on the description theory eliminates ostensive reference determination and obscures the presence of theoretical conflict.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Robert Burch (1979). James and the 'New' Theory of Reference. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 15 (4):283 - 297.score: 354.6
    This paper argues that several important tenets of the so-called "new theory of reference"--also known as the "historical-explanation theory" and as the "causal theory" of reference--were developed by william james as early as 1885 and that by 1895 they were elaborated by him in no less detail than contemporary theorists have so far done. these tenets include the central doctrine that reference is dependent on a causal or historical-explanatory chain connecting the act of referring (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ernianno Bencivenga (1983). An Epistemic Theory of Reference. Journal of Philosophy 80 (12):785-805.score: 354.6
    THIS ARTICLE PRESENTS A THEORY OF REFERENCE AS AN INTENTIONAL ACT, INDEPENDENT OF THE METAPHYSICAL ASSUMPTION OF THE EXISTENCE OF A REAL (AND COMMON) WORLD. ACCORDING TO THE THEORY, SPEAKERS REFER TO ENTITIES IN THEIR COGNITIVE SPACES. DIFFERENT SPEAKERS HAVE DIFFERENT SPACES, WHICH AT ANY GIVEN TIME MIRROR THEIR BELIEF-SYSTEMS AT THAT TIME. OBJECTS IN COGNITIVE SPACES ARE DISTINGUISHED FROM IDEAS, "SINNE", AND MEINONGIAN NON-EXISTENTS, AND SEVERAL DIFFICULTIES OF THE THEORY ARE DISCUSSED: AMONG THEM, HOW TO (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Brian O'Connor (2012). The Neo‐Hegelian Theory of Freedom and the Limits of Emancipation. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 352.8
    This paper critically evaluates what it identifies as ‘the institutional theory of freedom’ developed within recent neo-Hegelian philosophy (by Robert Pippin and, in a different way, Axel Honneth). While acknowledging the gains made against the Kantian theory of autonomy as detachment it is argued that the institutional theory ultimately undermines the very meaning of practical agency. By tying agency to institutionally sustained recognition it effectively excludes the exercise of practical reason geared toward emancipation from a settled normative (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jaakko Hintikka & Gabriel Sandu (1995). The Fallacies of the New Theory of Reference. Synthese 104 (2):245 - 283.score: 345.6
    The so-called New Theory of Reference (Marcus, Kripke etc.) is inspired by the insight that in modal and intensional contexts quantifiers presuppose nondescriptive unanalyzable identity criteria which do not reduce to any descriptive conditions. From this valid insight the New Theorists fallaciously move to the idea that free singular terms can exhibit a built-in direct reference and that there is even a special class of singular terms (proper names) necessarily exhibiting direct reference. This fallacious move has (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Quentin Smith (1995). Marcus, Kripke, and the Origin of the New Theory of Reference. Synthese 104 (2):179 - 189.score: 345.6
    In this paper, presented at an APA colloquium in Boston on December 28, 1994, it is argued that Ruth Barcan Marcus' 1961 article on Modalities and Intensional Languages originated many of the key ideas of the New Theory of Reference that have often been attributed to Saul Kripke and others. For example, Marcus argued that names are directly referential and are not equivalent to contingent descriptions, that names are rigid designators, and that identity sentences with co-referring names are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Quentin Smith (1995). Marcus and the New Theory of Reference: A Reply to Scott Soames. Synthese 104 (2):217 - 244.score: 345.6
    This paper is a reply to some of Scott Soames' comments on my colloquium paper Marcus, Kripke, and the Origin of the New Theory of Reference. Except for the indicated parts added in May, 1995, this paper was written on December 16th–25th, 1994 as my reply to Soames for the APA colloquium in Boston, December 28, 1994. In this paper, I argue that Soames' contention that Marcus is not one of the primary founders of contemporary (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David B. Boersema (1988). Is the Descriptivist / Cluster Theory of Reference “Wrong From the Fundamentals”? Philosophy Research Archives 14:517-538.score: 345.6
    In this paper I suggest that Searle’s theory of reference is immune to the specific criticisms that have been levelled against it. I first present an overview of Searle’s “cluster” theory, followed by an overview of the Kripkean critique. I then examine in detail Kripke’s objections and suggest that they are not sufficient for a rejection of Searle’s theory. Finally, I consider several general objections to the cluster theory and argue that they, too, do not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jaakko Hintikka (1998). The Pragmatic Fallacies of the New Theory of Reference. Pragmatics and Cognition 6 (1):9-20.score: 345.6
    The so-called New Theory of Reference (Marcus, Kripke etc.) is inspired by the insight that in modal and intensional contexts quantifiers presuppose nondescriptive unanalyzable identity criteria which do not reduce to any descriptive conditions. From this valid insight the New Theorists fallaciously move to the idea that free singular terms can exhibit a built-in direct reference and that there is even a special class of singular terms (proper names) necessarily exhibiting direct reference. This fallacious move has (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Gary H. Merrill (1979). Marginal Notes on the Theory of Reference. Grazer Philosophische Studien 9:35-50.score: 345.6
    In 'Notes on the Theory of Reference' Quine offers a brief argument, based on Tarski's Convention T and semantic definition of truth, that the theory of meaning is 'in a worse state' than is the theory of reference and that the concepts of the theory of meaning are inherently more 'foggy and mysterious' than those of thetheory of reference. A careful reconstruction of Quine's argument, however, is sufficient to show both that he covertly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Quentin Smith (1998). A More Comprehensive History of the New Theory of Reference. In P. W. Humphreys & J. H. Fetzer (eds.), The New Theory of Reference: Kripke, Marcus and its Origins. Kluwer.score: 345.6
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Charles Nussbaum (2001). Troubles with the Causal Homeostasis Theory of Reference. Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):155 – 178.score: 344.4
    While purely causal theories of reference have provided a plausible account of the meanings of names and natural kind terms, they cannot handle vacuous theoretical terms. The causal homeostasis theory can but incurs other difficulties. Theories of reference that are intensional and not purely causal tend to be molecularist or holist. Holist theories threaten transtheoretic reference, whereas molecularist theories must supply a principled basis for selecting privileged meaning-determining relations between terms. The causal homeostasis theory is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. William Demopoulos (2003). Book Symposium: The Reason's Proper Study: Essays Towards a Neo-Fregean Philosophy of Mathematics by Bob Hale and Crispin Wright: On the Philosophical Interest of Frege Arithmetic. Philosophical Books 44 (3):220-228.score: 343.8
    The paper considers Fregean and neo-Fregean strategies for securing the apriority of arithmetic. The Fregean strategy recovers the apriority of arithmetic from that of logic and a family of explicit definitions. The neo-Fregean strategy relies on a principle which, though not an explicit definition, is given the status of a stipulation; unlike the Fregean strategy it relies on an extension of second order logic which is not merely a definitional extension. The paper argues that this methodological difference is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Henry McDonald (2004). Language and Being: Crossroads of Modern Literary Theory and Classical Ontology. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (2):187-220.score: 340.8
    My argument is that poststructuralist and postmodernist theory carries on and intensifies the main lines of a characteristically modern tradition of aesthetics whose most important point of reference is not French structuralism – as the term, ‘poststructuralism’, implies – but the tradition of 18th-century German romanticism and idealism that culminated in the work of Heidegger during the Weimar period in Germany between the world wars and afterward. What characterizes this modernist tradition of aesthetics is its valorization of language (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Peter Simons (1995). Meinong's Theory of Sense and Reference. Grazer Philosophische Studien 50:171-186.score: 338.4
    Gilbert Ryle wrote that "Meaning-theory expanded just when and just in so far as it was released from that 'Fido'-Fido box, the lid of which was never even lifted by Meinong". This paper sets out to relieve Ryle's oversimplification about Meinong and the role of meaning theory in his thought. One step away from canine simplicity about meaning is the recognition of a distinction between sense and reference, such as we find in Frege, Husserl, and the early (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Joseph Agassi, Fundamenta Scientiae, 9, 1988, 189-202 (Slightly Revised) Neo-Classical Economics as 18th Century Theory Of.score: 338.4
    1. The Real Claim of the Chicago School If anything dramatic has happened in economic theory over the last one hundred years – namely, since the advent of marginalism – then, everyone agrees, it was not the rise of the Chicago neo -classical school which, after all, only synthesized the various versions of marginalism, but the Keynesian Revolution. Assessments of this revolution were repeatedly invited, particularly by opponent, chiefly from Chicago. F. A. von Hayek has explicitly and bitterly blames (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000