Search results for 'Neoliberalism' (try it on Scholar)

384 found
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  1.  7
    Johanna Oksala (2016). Foucault, Husserl and the Philosophical Roots of German Neoliberalism. Continental Philosophy Review 49 (1):115-126.
    The article investigates and vindicates the surprising claim Foucault makes in his lecture series The Birth of Biopolitics that the philosophical roots of post-war German neoliberalism lie in Husserl’s phenomenology. I study the similarities between Husserl’s phenomenology and Walter Eucken’s economic theory and examine the way that Husserl’s idea of the historical a priori assumes a determinate role in Eucken’s economic thinking. I also return to Foucault’s lectures in order to show how a version of the historical a priori (...)
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  2.  3
    David Newheiser (forthcoming). Foucault, Gary Becker and the Critique of Neoliberalism. Theory, Culture and Society.
    Although Foucault’s 1979 lectures on The Birth of Biopolitics promised to treat the theme of biopolitics, the course deals at length with neoliberalism while mentioning biopolitics hardly at all. Some scholars account for this elision by claiming that Foucault sympathized with neoliberalism; I argue on the contrary that Foucault develops a penetrating critique of the neoliberal claim to preserve individual liberty. Following Foucault, I show that the Chicago economist Gary Becker exemplifies what Foucault describes elsewhere as biopolitics: a (...)
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  3.  15
    Matthew Sharpe (2009). Is Neoliberalism a Liberalism, or a Strange Kind of Bird? On Hayek and Our Discontents. Critical Horizons 10 (1):76-98.
    This paper examines the theoretical ideas of Friedrich von Hayek, arguably the key progenitor of the global economic orthodoxy of the past two decades. It assesses Hayek's thought as he presents it: namely as a form of liberalism. Section I argues that Hayek's thought, if liberal, is hostile to participatory democracy. Section II then argues the more radical thesis that neoliberalism is also in truth an illiberal doctrine. Founded not in any social contract doctrine, but a form of constructivism, (...)
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  4.  9
    Zahra Meghani (2014). Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Food and Neoliberalism: An Argument for Democratizing the Regulatory Review Protocol of the Food and Drug Administration. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (6):967-989.
    The primary responsibility of the US Food and Drug Administration is to protect public health by ensuring the safety of the food supply. To that end, it sometimes conducts risk assessments of novel food products, such as genetically modified food. The FDA describes its regulatory review of GM food as a purely scientific activity, untainted by any normative considerations. This paper provides evidence that the regulatory agency is not justified in making that claim. It is argued that the (...)
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  5.  3
    Andrew Wilkins (2012). Commodifying Diversity: Education and Governance in the Era of Neoliberalism. Human Affairs 22 (2):122-130.
    In this paper I explore the pedagogical and political shift marked by the meaning and practice of diversity offered through New Labour education policy texts, specifically, the policy and practice of personalized learning . The aim of this paper is to map the ways in which diversity relays and mobilizes a set of neoliberal positions and relationships in the field of education and seeks to govern education institutions and education users through politically circulating norms and values. These norms and values, (...)
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  6. Rosalind Gill & Christina Scharff (eds.) (2011). New Femininities: Postfeminism, Neoliberalism, and Subjectivity. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- Preface; A.McRobbie -- Notes on Contributors -- Introduction; C.Scharff & R.Gill -- PART I: SEXUAL SUBJECTIVITY AND THE MAKEOVER PARADIGM -- Pregnant Beauty: Maternal Femininities under Neoliberalism; I.Tyler -- The Right to Be Beautiful: Postfeminist Identity and Consumer Beauty Advertising; M.M.Lazar -- Spicing It Up: Sexual Entrepreneurs and The Sex Inspectors; L.Harvey & R.Gill -- '(M)Other-in-Chief: Michelle Obama and the Ideal of Republican Womanhood'; L.Guerrero -- Scourging the Abject Body: Ten Years Younger (...)
     
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  7. Mark Olssen (2010). Liberalism, Neoliberalism, Social Democracy: Thin Communitarian Perspectives on Political Philosophy and Education. Routledge.
    Introduction: Beyond neoliberalism -- Friedrich A. Hayek : markets, planning, and the rule of law -- The politics of utopia and the liberal theory of totalitarianism : Karl Popper and Michael Foucault -- Pluralism and positive freedom : toward a critique of Isaiah Berlin -- From the Crick report to the Parekh report : multiculturalism, cultural difference and democracy -- Foucault, liberal education and the issue of autonomy -- Saving Martha Nussbaum from herself : help from friends she didn't (...)
     
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  8.  15
    Mariano Féliz (2012). Neo-Developmentalism: Beyond Neoliberalism? Capitalist Crisis and Argentina's Development Since the 1990s. Historical Materialism 20 (2):105-123.
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  9.  43
    Peter Roberts (2009). A New Patriotism? Neoliberalism, Citizenship and Tertiary Education in New Zealand. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (4):410-423.
    This paper argues that a new patriotism has emerged in New Zealand over recent years. This has been promoted in tandem with the notion of advancing New Zealand as a knowledge economy and society. The new patriotism encourages New Zealanders to accept, indeed embrace, a single, shared vision of the future: one structured by a neoliberal ontology and the demands of global capitalism. This constructs a narrow view of citizenship and reduces the possibility of economic and social alternatives being considered (...)
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  10.  6
    Eren Duzgun (2012). Islam's Marriage with Neoliberalism: State Transformation in Turkey, Yıldız Atasoy, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. Historical Materialism 20 (3):181-200.
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  11.  11
    Richard Westra (2009). Firing Back: Against the Tyranny of the Market 2: Global Turbulence: Social Activists' and State Responses to Globalization: Globalization and Inequality: Neoliberalism's Downward Spiral: Anti-Capitalism: A Marxist Introduction. Historical Materialism 17 (2):253-260.
  12.  1
    Seongjin Jeong (2009). The Korean Developmental State: From Dirigisme to Neoliberalism. Historical Materialism 17 (3):244-257.
  13.  11
    David Harvey (2007). A Brief History of Neoliberalism. OUP Oxford.
    Writing for a wide audience, Harvey here tells the political-economic story of where neoliberalization came from and how it proliferated on the world stage. He constructs a framework, not only for analyzing the political and economic dangers that now surround us, but also for assessing the prospects for more socially just alternatives.
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  14. Richard Collier (2014). 'Love Law, Love Life': Neoliberalism, Wellbeing and Gender in the Legal Profession—The Case of Law School. Legal Ethics 17 (2):202-230.
    In recent years the issue of wellbeing has moved centre stage across jurisdictions within a wide range of debates relating to economic, cultural and political changes associated with neoliberalism. This is the backdrop against which the legal profession has itself begun to pay increasing attention to the issue of wellbeing in law. This article explores an aspect of this debate that has tended to be neglected thus far, namely the relationship between the neoliberal corporatisation of universities, gender and questions (...)
     
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  15.  16
    M. Lazzarato (2009). Neoliberalism in Action: Inequality, Insecurity and the Reconstitution of the Social. Theory, Culture and Society 26 (6):109-133.
    This paper draws from Foucault’s analysis of liberalism and neoliberalism to reconstruct the mechanisms and the means whereby neoliberalism has transformed society into an ‘enterprise society’ based on the market, competition, inequality, and the privilege of the individual. It highlights the role of financialization, neglected by Foucault, as a key apparatus in achieving this transformation. It elaborates the strategies of individualization, insecuritization and depoliticization used as part of neoliberal social policy to undermine the principles and practices of mutualization (...)
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  16.  17
    Jason Read (2009). A Genealogy of Homo-Economicus: Neoliberalism and the Production of Subjectivity. Foucault Studies 6:25-36.
    This article examines Michel Foucault’s critical investigation of neoliberalism in the course published as Naissance de la biopolitique: Cours au Collège de France, 1978-1979. Foucault’s lectures are interrogated along two axes. First, examining the way in which neoliberalism can be viewed as a particular production of subjectivity, as a way in which individuals are constituted as subjects of “human capital.” Secondly, Foucault’s analyses is augmented and critically examined in light of other critical work on neoliberalism by Wendy (...)
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  17.  7
    Hugh Campbell, Anne Murcott & Angela MacKenzie (2011). Kosher in New York City, Halal in Aquitaine: Challenging the Relationship Between Neoliberalism and Food Auditing. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):67-79.
    Previous work in the agri-food tradition has framed food auditing as a novelty characteristic of a shift to neoliberal governance in agri-food systems and has tackled the analysis of food “quality” in the same light. This article argues that agri-food scholars’ recent interest in the contested qualities of food needs to be situated alongside a much longer history of contested cultural attributions of trust in food relations. It builds on an earlier discussion suggesting that, although neoliberalism has undoubtedly opened (...)
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  18.  60
    Dustin Avent-Holt (2012). The Political Dynamics of Market Organization: Cultural Framing, Neoliberalism, and the Case of Airline Deregulation. Sociological Theory 30 (4):283 - 302.
    Sociologists have argued that markets are politically constituted, yet we lack an understanding of the causal mechanisms through which political mobilization organizes and reorganizes markets over time. In this article I show how the concept of cultural framing—already widely used by economic sociologists—can be further developed to explain how mobilization reproduces markets in some moments while reorganizing them in others. Specifically, I link the concept of cultural framing to rent-seeking mobilization within markets to better explain when political contestation will lead (...)
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  19.  38
    George DeMartino (2000). Global Economy, Global Justice: Theoretical Objections and Policy Alternatives to Neoliberalism. Routledge.
    Global Economy, Global Justice explores a vital question that is suppressed in most economics texts: "what makes for a good economic outcome?" Neoclassical theory embraces the normative perspective of "welfarism" to assess economic outcomes. This volume demonstrates the fatal flaws of this perspective--flaws that stem from objectionable assumptions about human nature, society and science. Exposing these failures, the book obliterates the ethical foundations of global neoliberalism. George DeMartino probes heterodox economic traditions and philosophy in search of an ethically viable (...)
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  20.  68
    Wendy Brown (2006). American Nightmare: Neoliberalism, Neoconservatism, and De-Democratization. Political Theory 34 (6):690 - 714.
    Neoliberalism and neoconservatism are two distinct political rationalities in the contemporary United States. They have few overlapping formal characteristics, and even appear contradictory in many respects. Yet they converge not only in the current presidential administration but also in their de-democratizing effects. Their respective devaluation of political liberty, equality, substantive citizenship, and the rule of law in favor of governance according to market criteria on the one side, and valorization of state power for putatively moral ends on the other, (...)
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  21.  6
    Edward Nik-Khah & Robert Van Horn (2012). Inland Empire: Economics Imperialism as an Imperative of Chicago Neoliberalism. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):259-282.
    Recent work such as Steven Levitt's Freakonomics has prompted economic methodologists to reevaluate the state of relations between economics and its neighboring disciplines. Although this emerging literature on ?economics imperialism? has its merits, the positions advanced within it have been remarkably divergent: some have argued that economics imperialism is a fiction; others that it is a fact attributable to the triumph of neoclassical economics; and yet others that the era of economics imperialism is over. We believe the confusion results in (...)
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  22.  10
    Josée Johnston & Kate Cairns (2015). Choosing Health: Embodied Neoliberalism, Postfeminism, and the “Do-Diet”. Theory and Society 44 (2):153-175.
    Feminist scholars have long demonstrated how women are constrained through dieting discourse. Today’s scholars wrestle with similar themes, but confront a thornier question: how do we make sense of a food discourse that frames food choices through a lens of empowerment and health, rather than vanity and restriction? This article addresses this question, drawing from interviews and focus groups with women, as well as health-focused food writing. These data allow us to document a postfeminist food discourse that we term the (...)
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  23.  35
    Nanette Funk (2013). Contra Fraser on Feminism and Neoliberalism. Hypatia 28 (1):179-196.
    This article is a critical examination of Nancy Fraser's contrast of early second-wave feminism and contemporary global feminism in “Feminism, Capitalism and the Cunning of History,” (Fraser ). Fraser contrasts emancipatory early second-wave feminism, strongly critical of capitalism, with feminism in the age of neoliberalism as being in a “dangerous liaison” with neoliberalism. I argue that Fraser's historical account of 1970s mainstream second-wave feminism is inaccurate, that it was not generally anti-capitalist, critical of the welfare system, or challenging (...)
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  24.  4
    Peter Wehling (2015). Luigi Pellizzoni and Marja Ylönen , Neoliberalism and Technoscience: Critical Assessments. Minerva 53 (2):193-198.
    Since the 1980s the concepts of “neoliberalism” and “technoscience,” although both of them were coined earlier, have almost simultaneously become rather prominent conceptual tools in various fields of social science research. The starting point of Neoliberalism and Technoscience: Critical Assessments, edited by Luigi Pellizzoni and Marja Ylönen, is the assumption that this temporal overlap is not just a coincidence and that it would be “quite surprising, then, to find no or merely casual connections between neoliberalization processes and technoscience” (...)
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  25.  11
    David J. Hess (2013). Neoliberalism and the History of STS Theory: Toward a Reflexive Sociology. Social Epistemology 27 (2):177 - 193.
    In the sociology of science and sociology of scientific knowledge, the decline of functionalism during the 1970s opened the field to a wide range of theoretical possibilities. However, a Marxist-influenced alternative to functionalism, interests analysis, quickly disappeared, and feminist-multicultural frameworks failed to achieved a dominant position in the field. Instead, functionalism was replaced by a variety of agency-based frameworks that focused on constructive or performative processes. The shift in the sociology of science from Mertonian functionalism to the poststrong program, agency-based (...)
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  26.  7
    Olivia Bako (2011). Neoliberalism and its Effect on Women in Poverty. The Lyceum 1 (1):32-40.
    There is a negative influence of neoliberalism on poverty in Canada, specifically its impact on women in the lower socioeconomic sectors; the relationship between the government and women; and the importance of addressing women‟s issues in the context of welfare.
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  27.  6
    Edwige Kacenelenbogen (2009). Epistemological Modesty Within Contemporary Political Thought A Link Between Hayek's Neoliberalism and Pettit's Republicanism. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (4):449-471.
    In this paper, I expound Philip Pettit’s political thought as an example of a ‘spontaneous and naturalistic’ view of politics and place his account within a liberal tradition of epistemological modesty which Pettit imagines he has transcended. To this end, I highlight the affinities between Pettit’s theory of freedom and a paradigmatically ‘modest’ social theory, namely, Hayek’s theory of the spontaneous social order. In light of the comparison with Hayek, I show that Pettit’s distinction between liberal and republican thought is (...)
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  28.  8
    Gordon Hull (2013). Biopolitics Is Not (Primarily) About Life: On Biopolitics, Neoliberalism, and Families. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (3):322-335.
    The emergence of topics such as reprogenetics and genetic testing for hereditary diseases attests to the continued salience of Foucault's analyses of biopolitics. His various discussions pose at least two problems for contemporary appropriation of the work. First, it is unclear what the "life" on which biopolitics operates actually refers to.1 Second, it is unclear how biopolitics relates to the economy, either in the classical form of the family/household (oikos) or in the current form of neoliberalism.2 In what follows, (...)
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  29.  5
    Charles S. Brown (2013). Can Neoliberalism Become the Ideology for a New World Order? Dialogue and Universalism 19 (3/5):35-39.
    The paper is a response to Adam Daniel Rotfeld’s essay, “Shaping a New International System for the Twenty First Century”. Rotfeld’s essay offers provocative insights to current world affairs while asking timely questions. In the following pages I respond to a few of the large and important ideas Rotfeld raises. I do not attempt to engage in a direct dialogue with the details or justifications of Rotfeld’s analysis but rather explore some of his insights in new directions. I do argue (...)
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  30.  5
    Kevin Young (2005). How Neoliberalism Reproduces Itself. Philosophy of Management 5 (2):79-88.
    This paper explicates a Marxian theory of management that suggests that the social relation to be managed in capitalism is the separation of the political from the economic. While it is commonly understood that this must be an active process of management taken up on behalf of modern capitalist states, this paper suggests that the market mechanism itself also assumes this role without the active intervention of any managerial direction. The intensive expansion of the market facilitates a management function of (...)
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  31. Tony Smith, Neoliberalism and the Limits of Global Reforms: Some Recent Books on Globalization.
    The main argument in favor of neoliberalism is simple enough: individuals will freely exchange whenever mutual gains result. It follows that restricting trade and investment across borders both infringes liberty and prevents people from enjoying benefits. At this point an appeal is made to historical evidence: previously poor regions have lifted more people out of poverty at a faster rate than ever before in human history by opening up to trade and investment. Neoliberal theorists and policy makers conclude..
     
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  32.  3
    Antonia Darder (2012). Neoliberalism in the Academic Borderlands: An On-Going Struggle for Equality and Human Rights. Educational Studies 48 (5):412-426.
    The article examines the negative impact of neoliberal policies upon the work of border intellectuals within the university, whose scholarship seeks to explicitly challenge longstanding structural inequalities and social exclusions. More specifically, the notion of neoliberal multiculturalism is defined and discussed with respect to the phenomenon of economic Darwinism and the whitewashing of contemporary academic labor, despite a tradition of progressive struggle within the academy. In response to the current counter-egalitarian climate of neoliberalism, a call is issued for a (...)
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  33.  3
    Dongwoo Kim (2013). Modernization or Betrayal: Neoliberalism in Mexico. Constellations 4 (1).
    This paper examines the effects of neoliberalism in Mexico undertaken during the administration of Carlos Salinas leading to the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1994. The effects of neolibralist policy on common people as well as resistance to the administration’s policies are examined in depth.
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  34.  7
    Ladelle McWhorter (2010). Darwin's Invisible Hand: Feminism, Reprogenetics, and Foucault's Analysis of Neoliberalism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):43-63.
    In his 1979 lecture series now translated as The Birth of Biopolitics, Michel Foucault suggests that there is an important relationship between neoliberalism and the cluster of phenomena he had previously named “biopower.” The relationship between these two apparently very different forms of governmentality is not obvious, however, and Foucault does not explicate it. The question has become a pressing one for feminists because it underlies a set of issues surrounding the emerging field of “reprogenetics.” Feminists have been highly (...)
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  35. Anita Chari (2015). A Political Economy of the Senses: Neoliberalism, Reification, Critique. Cup.
    Anita Chari revives the concept of reification from Marx and the Frankfurt School to spotlight the resistance to neoliberal capitalism now forming at the level of political economy and at the more sensate, experiential level of subjective transformation. Reading art by Oliver Ressler, Zanny Begg, Claire Fontaine, Jason Lazarus, and Mika Rottenberg, as well as the politics of Occupy Wall Street, Chari identifies practices through which artists and activists have challenged neoliberalism's social and political logics, exposing its inherent tensions (...)
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  36. Todd May (2012). Friendship in an Age of Economics: Resisting the Forces of Neoliberalism. Lexington Books.
    This is the first book not only to detail the relationships neoliberalism encourages us to have but also to see how friendship can provide a bulwark of resistance to it. Written in an engaging style, it will be understandable to political theorists, philosophers, social scientists, and cultural theorists.
     
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  37. Todd May (2014). Friendship in an Age of Economics: Resisting the Forces of Neoliberalism. Lexington Books.
    Friendship in an Age of Economics is the first book not only to detail the relationships neoliberalism encourages us to have, but also to see how friendship can provide a bulwark of resistance to them. Written in an engaging style, it will be understandable to political theorists, philosophers, social scientists, and cultural theorists.
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  38. Adrian Parr (2012). The Wrath of Capital: Neoliberalism and Climate Change Politics. Columbia University Press.
    Adrian Parr calls attention to the problematic socioeconomic conditions of neoliberal capitalism underpinning the world's current environmental challenges, and she argues that, until we grasp the implications of neoliberalism's interference ...
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  39. Adrian Parr (2014). The Wrath of Capital: Neoliberalism and Climate Change Politics. Cup.
    Although climate change has become the dominant concern of the twenty-first century, global powers refuse to implement the changes necessary to reverse these trends. Instead, they have neoliberalized nature and climate change politics and discourse, and there are indications of a more virulent strain of capital accumulation on the horizon. Adrian Parr calls attention to the problematic socioeconomic conditions of neoliberal capitalism underpinning the world's environmental challenges, and she argues that, until we grasp the implications of neoliberalism's interference in (...)
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  40.  13
    K. Lynch (2014). New Managerialism, Neoliberalism and Ranking. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 13 (2):141-153.
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  41.  4
    Raewyn Connell & Nour Dados (2014). Where in the World Does Neoliberalism Come From? Theory and Society 43 (2):117-138.
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  42. Bob Brecher (2012). The Family and Neoliberalism: Time to Revive a Critique. Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):157-167.
    I argue that the family remains integral to neoliberal capitalism. First, I identify two tensions in the neoliberals' advocacy of the traditional family: that the ?family values? advocated run directly counter to the homo economicus of the ?free market?; and the fact that the increasingly strident rhetoric of the family belies its decreasing popularity. The implications of these tensions for how we might think of the family, I then propose, suggest that earlier critiques are worth revisiting for what they have (...)
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  43.  79
    Ilja Srubar (1996). Neoliberalism, Transformation and Civil Society. Thesis Eleven 47 (1):33-47.
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  44.  16
    John McMahon (2015). Behavioral Economics as Neoliberalism: Producing and Governing Homo Economicus. Contemporary Political Theory 14 (2):137.
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  45.  2
    Bronwyn Parry (2015). Narratives of Neoliberalism: ‘Clinical Labour’ in Context. Medical Humanities 41 (1):32-37.
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  46.  41
    Chris Lorenz (2012). If You 'Re So Smart, Why Are You Under Surveillance? Universities, Neoliberalism, and New Public Management'. Critical Inquiry 38 (3):599-629.
    Although universities have undergone changes since the dawn of their existence, the speed of change started to accelerate remarkably in the 1960s. Spectacular growth in the number of students and faculty was immediately followed by administrative reforms aimed at managing this growth and managing the demands of students for democratic reform and societal relevance. Since the 1980s, however, an entirely different wind has been blowing along the academic corridors. The fiscal crisis of the welfare states and the neoliberal course of (...)
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  47.  33
    Robert Frodeman, Adam Briggle & J. Britt Holbrook (2012). Philosophy in the Age of Neoliberalism. Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):311-330.
    This essay argues that political, economic, and cultural developments have made the twentieth century disciplinary approach to philosophy unsustainable. It (a) discusses the reasons behind this unsustainability, which also affect the academy at large, (b) describes applied philosophy as an inadequate theoretical reaction to contemporary societal pressures, and (c) proposes a dedisciplined and interstitial approach??field philosophy??as a better response to the challenges facing the twenty-first century philosophy.
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  48.  6
    Trent H. Hamann (2009). Neoliberalism, Governmentality, and Ethics. Foucault Studies 6:37-59.
    This paper illustrates the relevance of Foucault’s analysis of neoliberal governance for a critical understanding of recent transformations in individual and social life in the United States, particularly in terms of how the realms of the public and the private and the personal and the political are understood and practiced. The central aim of neoliberal governmentality (“the conduct of conduct”) is the strategic creation of social conditions that encourage and necessitate the production of Homo economicus, a historically specific form of (...)
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  49.  7
    Kristen Smith (2012). The Problematization of Medical Tourism: A Critique of Neoliberalism. Developing World Bioethics 12 (1):1-8.
    The past two decades have seen the extensive privatisation and marketisation of health care in an ever reaching number of developing countries. Within this milieu, medical tourism is being promoted as a rational economic development strategy for some developing nations, and a makeshift solution to the escalating waiting lists and exorbitant costs of health care in developed nations. This paper explores the need to problematize medical tourism in order to move beyond one dimensional neoliberal discourses that have, to date, dominated (...)
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  50.  13
    N. Gane (2014). The Emergence of Neoliberalism: Thinking Through and Beyond Michel Foucault's Lectures on Biopolitics. Theory, Culture and Society 31 (4):3-27.
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