Search results for 'Neoplatonism History' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Paul Ernest Walker (1993). Early Philosophical Shiism: The Ismaili Neoplatonism of Abū Yaʻqūb Al-Sijistānī. Cambridge University Press.score: 78.0
    The Ismailis, among whom are the followers of the Aga Khan, rose to prominence during the 4th Islamic/10th Christian century. They developed a remarkably successful intellectual programme to sustain and support their political activities, promoting demands of Islamic doctrine together with the then newly imported sciences from abroad. The high watermark of this intellectual movement is best illustrated in the writings of the Ismaili theoretician Abu Ya´qub al-Sijistani. Using both published and manuscript writings of al-Sijistani that have hitherto been largely (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Édouard Jeauneau & Haijo Jan Westra (eds.) (1992). From Athens to Chartres: Neoplatonism and Medieval Thought: Studies in Honour of Edouard Jeauneau. E.J. Brill.score: 78.0
    "Philosophy -- The Later Middle Ages: Zenon Kaluza.Conceived as an hommage for Edouard Jeauneau -- "mantre par excellence -- the volume is introduced by a ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jaap Mansfeld (1998). Prolegomena Mathematica: From Apollonius of Perga to the Late Neoplatonism. With an Appendix on Pappus and the History of Platonism. Brill.score: 78.0
    This is the first study to deal with Greek mathematics from the viewpoint of cultural history.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alexander Treiger (2007). Andrei Iakovlevic Borisov (1903–1942) and His Studies of Medieval Arabic Philosophy. •A.Ia. Borisov, Materialy I Issledovaniia Po Istorii Neoplatonizma Na Srednevekovom Vostoke [=Materials and Studies on the History of Neoplatonism in the Medieval East], Ed. By K. B. Starkova, Pravoslavnyi Palestinskii Sbornik, Issue 99 (36), St. Petersburg, 2002, 256pp., ISBN 5-86007-216-. [REVIEW] Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 17 (1):159-195.score: 72.0
  5. James Wilberding & Christoph Horn (eds.) (2012). Neoplatonism and the Philosophy of Nature. Oxford UP.score: 72.0
    This volume dispels the idea that Platonism was an otherworldly enterprise which neglected the study of the natural world. Leading scholars examine how the Platonists of late antiquity sought to understand and explain natural phenomena: their essays offer a new understanding of the metaphysics of Platonism, and its place in the history of science.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Sara Ahbel-Rappe (1999). Reading Neoplatonism: Non-Discursive Thinking in the Texts of Plotinus, Proclus, and Damascius. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    Neoplatonism is a term used to designate the form of Platonic philosophy that developed in the Roman Empire from the third to the fifth century AD and that based itself on the corpus of Plato's dialogues. Sara Rappe's challenging and innovative study is the first book to analyse Neoplatonic texts themselves using contemporary philosophy of language. It covers the whole tradition of Neoplatonic writing from Plotinus through Proclus to Damascius. Addressing the strain of mysticism in these works from a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Vincent Lloyd (2009). Levinas and the Greek Heritage. By Jean-Marc Narbonne and One Hundred Years of Neoplatonism in France: A Brief Philosophical History. By Wayne J. Hankey. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 50 (6):1068-1069.score: 72.0
  8. John F. Finamore (1998). Gregory Shaw, Theurgy and the Soul: The Neoplatonism of Iamblichus. (Hermeneutics: Studies in the History of Religions.) University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1995. Pp. Xi, 268; Diagrams and Black-and-White Figures. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (3):894-896.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Wayne Hankey (1998). From Metaphysics to History, From Exodus to Neoplatonism, From Scholasticism to Pluralism: The Fate of Gilsonian Thomism in English-Speaking North America. Dionysius 16:157.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.) (1981). Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications.score: 66.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Stephen Gersh (1978). From Iamblichus to Eriugena: An Investigation of the Prehistory and Evolution of the Pseudo-Dionysian Tradition. Brill.score: 60.0
    INTRODUCTION The subtitle of this book indicates that it may be understood to some extent as a study of that mysterious figure who for centuries passed ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. A. H. Armstrong (1957/1981). An Introduction to Ancient Philosophy. Littlefield Adams.score: 60.0
    Covers the period from the beginning of Greek Philosophy to St. Augustine.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Glucker (1978). Antiochus and the Late Academy. Vandenhoeck Und Ruprecht.score: 60.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. John N. Martin (2004). Themes in Neoplatonic and Aristotelian Logic: Order, Negotiation, and Abstraction. Ashgate.score: 54.0
    This book shows otherwise. John Martin rehabilitates Neoplatonism, founded by Plotinus and brought into Christianity by St. Augustine.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Andrew Smith (2004). Philosophy in Late Antiquity. Routledge.score: 54.0
    One of the most significant cultural achievements of Late Antiquity lies in the domains of philosophy and religion, more particularly in the establishment and development of Neoplatonism as one of the chief vehicles of thought and subsequent channel for the transmission of ancient philosophy to the medieval and renaissance worlds. Important, too, is the emergence of a distinctive Christian philosophy and theology based on a foundation of Greek pagan thought. This book provides an introduction to the main ideas of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Algis Uždavinys (2008). Philosophy and Theurgy in Late Antiquity. Sophi Perennis.score: 54.0
    The origins and meaning of philosophy -- Voices of the fire : ancient theurgy and its tools -- Sacred images and animated statues in antiquity -- Metaphysical symbols and their function in theurgy -- Divine rites and philosophy in neoplatonism.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Aaron W. Hughes (2010). Maimonides and the Pre-Maimonidean Jewish Philosophical Tradition According to Hermann Cohen. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 18 (1):1-26.score: 48.0
    This paper examines Hermann Cohen's idiosyncratic construction of a medieval Jewish philosophical tradition, focusing primarily, though not exclusively, on his Charakteristik der Ethik Maimunis . This construction, not unlike modern accounts, is filtered through the central place of Maimonides. For Cohen, however, Maimonides' centrality is defined not by his systematization of Aristotelianism, but by his elevation of ethics over metaphysics. The ethical and pantheistic concerns of Maimonides' precursors, according to this reading, anticipate his uniqueness. Whereas Shlomo ibn Gabirol's pantheistic doctrine (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Verena Olejniczak Lobsien & Claudia Olk (eds.) (2007). Neuplatonismus Und Ästhetik: Zur Transformationsgeschichte des Schönen. De Gruyter.score: 48.0
    The volume enquires into the relationship between philosophy and aesthetics in Late Antiquity. Is the sensuous beauty of art a medium for the highest thinkable truth?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Riccardo Chiaradonna (ed.) (2012). Il Platonismo E le Scienze. Roma Tre Università Degli Studi.score: 48.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Patricia Cruzalegui Sotelo (2006). The Platonic Experience in Nineteenth-Century England. Pontificia Universidad Católica Del Perú, Fondo Editorial.score: 48.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Donald F. Duclow (2006). Masters of Learned Ignorance: Eriugena, Eckhart, Cusanus. Ashgate.score: 48.0
  22. Ivan Khristov (ed.) (2004). Neoplatonizŭm I Khristii͡anstvo. Izdatelska Kŭshta "Lik".score: 48.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Hans Joachim Krämer (1963/1964). Der Ursprung Der Geistmetaphysik. Amsterdam, Schippers.score: 48.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Christine Noille-Clauzade (2004). L'éloquence du Sage: Platonisme Et Rhétorique Dans la Seconde Moitié du Xviie Siècle. Honoré Champion Éditeur.score: 48.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Rabouin (2009). Mathesis Universalis: L'Idée de Mathématique Universelle d'Aristote à Descartes. Presses Universitaires de France.score: 48.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Christian Schäfer (2006). Philosophy of Dionysius the Areopagite: An Introduction to the Structure and the Content of the Treatise on the Divine Names. Brill.score: 48.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Andrei Timotin (2012). La Démonologie Platonicienne: Histoire de la Notion de Daimōn de Platon aux Derniers Néoplatoniciens. Brill.score: 48.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Giovanna Varani (2008). Pensiero "Alato" E Modernità: Il Neoplatonismo Nella Storiografia Filosofica in Germania, 1559-1807. Cleup.score: 48.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Ilsetraut Hadot (2004). Studies on the Neoplatonist Hierocles. American Philosophical Society.score: 42.0
    Preface The Neoplatonist Hierocles, who lived in the fifth century ad and taught at Alexandria, has not yet received his due place in the history of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John Michael Corrigan (2010). The Metempsychotic Mind: Emerson and Consciousness. Journal of the History of Ideas 71 (3):433-455.score: 42.0
    This article argues that Ralph Waldo Emerson employs metempsychosis (reincarnation or the transmigration of the soul into successive bodies) as a figurative template for human consciousness. Mapping various traditions from Hinduism, Pythagoreanism, Platonism, and Neoplatonism onto the vastness of the geological and biological records, Emerson translates metaphysics for modernity: he depicts the soul's journey through the chronological sequence of history as a poetic process that culminates in a tenuous form of self-knowledge.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stefania Bonfiglioli & Costantino Marmo (2007). Symbolism and Linguistic Semantics. Some Questions (and Confusions) From Late Antique Neoplatonism Up to Eriugena. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):238-252.score: 42.0
    The notion of 'symbol' in Eriugena's writing is far from clear. It has an ambiguous semantic connection with other terms such as 'signification', 'figure', 'allegory', 'veil', 'agalma', 'form', 'shadow', 'mystery' and so on. This paper aims to explore into the origins of such a semantic ambiguity, already present in the texts of the pseudo-Dionysian corpus which Eriugena translated and commented upon. In the probable Neoplatonic sources of this corpus, the Greek term symbolon shares some aspects of its meaning with other (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Wayne J. Hankey (2004). Why Heidegger's “History” of Metaphysics is Dead. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):425-443.score: 42.0
    I outline features of the emerging consensus that philosophy has now liberated itself from the horizon of onto-theology with respect to the history of metaphysics. I draw on Jean-Marc Narbonne, Hénologie, Ontologie et Ereignis (Plotin-Proclus-Heidegger), conferences presented at La métaphysique: son histoire, sa critique, ses enjeux held at Laval University in 1998, and other recent work, showingwhy Heidegger’s horizon does not encompass ancient or medieval Platonic or Aristotelian philosophy. Noting that both French Neoplatonic studies after Bréhier and Heidegger in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Karsten Friis Johansen (1999). A History of Ancient Philosophy: From the Beginning to Augustine. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Translated by Henrik Rosenmeier, A History of Ancient Philosophy charts the origins and development of ancient philosophical thought. For easy reference, the book is divided chronologically into six main parts. The sections are further divided into philosophers and philosophical movements: *Pre-Socratic Philosophy, including mythology, the Pythagoreans and Parmenides *The Great Century of Athens, including the Sophists and Socrates *Plato, including The Republic, The Symposium and The Timaeus *Aristotle, including The Physics, The Metaphysics and The Poetics *Hellenistic Philosophy, including the (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Svetla Slaveva-Griffin & Pauliina Remes (eds.) (2014). The Routledge Handbook of Neoplatonism. Routledge.score: 42.0
    The Routledge Handbook of Neoplatonism is an authoritative and comprehensive survey of the most important issues and developments in one of the fastest growing areas of research in ancient philosophy. An international team of scholars situates and re-evaluates Neoplatonism within the history of ancient philosophy and thought, and explore its influence on philosophical and religious schools worldwide. The Routledge Handbook of Neoplatonism is a major reference source for all students and scholars in Neoplatonism and ancient (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Stephen H. Daniel (2001). Berkeley's Christian Neoplatonism, Archetypes, and Divine Ideas. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):239-258.score: 36.0
    Berkeley's doctrine of archetypes explains how God perceives and can have the same ideas as finite minds. His appeal of Christian neo-Platonism opens up a way to understand how the relation of mind, ideas, and their union is modeled on the Cappadocian church fathers' account of the persons of the trinity. This way of understanding Berkeley indicates why he, in contrast to Descartes or Locke, thinks that mind (spiritual substance) and ideas (the object of mind) cannot exist or be thought (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. William Franke (2006). Apophasis and the Turn of Philosophy to Religion: From Neoplatonic Negative Theology to Postmodern Negation of Theology. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):61 - 76.score: 36.0
    This essay represents part of an effort to rewrite the history metaphysics in terms of what philosophy never said, nor could say. It works from the Neoplatonic commentary tradition on Plato's Parmenides as the matrix for a distinctively apophatic thinking that takes the truth of metaphysical doctrines as something other than anything that can be logically articulated. It focuses on Damascius in the 5—6th century AD as the culmination of this tradition in the ancient world and emphasizes that (...) represents the crisis of Greek metaphysics on account of the inability to give a rational account of foundations for knowing and of the ultimate principle of beings. Neoplatonism discovered how all such ultimate principles were necessarily beyond the reach of reason and speech. This apophatic insight is drawn out with the help of contemporary criticism of Neoplatonic philosophy, defining also some points of divergence. The essay then discusses the motives for thinking the unsayable in postmodern times on the basis of this parallel with Neoplatonic thought. Discourse's becoming critical of itself to the point of self-subversion animates them both. However, the tendency in postmodern thought to totally reject theology, including negative theology, is a betrayal of its own deepest motivations. This tendency is debated through an examination of the thought of Jean-Luc Nancy. While any traditional discourse can be negated, the negating and self-negating capacity of discourse itself is infinite, and this is where a perennial negative theological philosophy of the unsayable is to be located. Language, eminently the language of philosophy, as infinitely open, points in a direction which becomes equally and ineluctably theological. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Abraham Akkerman (2006). Femininity and Masculinity in City-Form: Philosophical Urbanism as a History of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):229 - 256.score: 36.0
    Mutual feedback between human-made environments and facets of thought throughout history has yielded two myths: the Garden and the Citadel. Both myths correspond to Jung’s feminine and masculine collective subconscious, as well as to Nietzsche’s premise of Apollonian and Dionysian impulses in art. Nietzsche’s premise suggests, furthermore, that the feminine myth of the Garden is time-bound whereas the masculine myth of the Citadel, or the Ideal City, constitutes a spatial deportment. Throughout history the two myths have continually molded (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Simo Knuuttila (2004). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    Emotions are the focus of intense debate both in contemporary philosophy and psychology, and increasingly also in the history of ideas. Simo Knuuttila presents a comprehensive survey of philosophical theories of emotion from Plato to Renaissance times, combining rigorous philosophical analysis with careful historical reconstruction. The first part of the book covers the conceptions of Plato and Aristotle and later ancient views from Stoicism to Neoplatonism and, in addition, their reception and transformation by early Christian thinkers from Clement (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Luc Brisson (2004). How Philosophers Saved Myths: Allegorical Interpretation and Classical Mythology. University of Chicago Press.score: 36.0
    This study explains how the myths of Greece and Rome were transmitted from antiquity to the Renaissance. Luc Brisson argues that philosophy was ironically responsible for saving myth from historical annihilation. Although philosophy was initially critical of myth because it could not be declared true or false and because it was inferior to argumentation, mythology was progressively reincorporated into philosophy through allegorical exegesis. Brisson shows to what degree allegory was employed among philosophers and how it enabled myth to take on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Peter van Nuffelen (2011). Rethinking the Gods: Philosophical Readings of Religion in the Post-Hellenistic Period. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Ancient philosophers had always been fascinated by religion. From the first century BC onwards the traditionally hostile attitude of Greek and Roman philosophy was abandoned in favour of the view that religion was a source of philosophical knowledge. This book studies that change, not from the usual perspective of the history of religion, but as part of the wider tendency of Post-Hellenistic philosophy to open up to external, non-philosophical sources of knowledge and authority. It situates two key themes, ancient (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Matthias Lutz-Bachmann, Alexander Fidora & Andreas Niederberger (eds.) (2004). Metaphysics in the Twelfth Century: On the Relationship Among Philosophy, Science, and Theology. Brepols.score: 36.0
    Although metaphysics as a discipline can hardly be separated from Aristotle and his works, the questions it raises were certainly known to authors even before the reception of Aristotle in the thirteenth century. Even without the explicit use of this term the twelfth century manifested a strong interest in metaphysical questions under the guise of «natural philosophy» or «divine science», leading M.-D. Chenu to coin the expression of a twelfth century «éveil métaphysique». In their commentaries on Boethius and under the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Frans A. J. de Haas (1997). John Philoponus' New Definition of Prime Matter: Aspects of its Background in Neoplatonism and the Ancient Commentary Tradition. E.J. Brill.score: 30.0
    This is the first full discussion of Philoponus' account of matter.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. R. E. Witt (1937/1971). Albinus and the History of Middle Platonism. Amsterdam,Hakkert.score: 30.0
    Originally published in 1937, this book examines the subject of the Didaskalikos and its often overlooked author Albinus.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. H. J. Blumenthal (1996). Aristotle and Neoplatonism in Late Antiquity: Interpretations of the De Anima. Cornell University Press.score: 30.0
    Introduction: why the De anima commentaries? This book will concentrate on interpretations of the De anima in late antiquity, and what we can learn from ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Aphrodite Alexandrakis & Nicholas J. Moutafakis (eds.) (2001). Neoplatonism and Western Aesthetics. State University of New York Press.score: 30.0
    Shows how the aesthetic views of Plotinus and later Neoplatonists have played a role in the history of Western art.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Sarah Pessin (2013). Ibn Gabirol's Theology of Desire: Matter and Method in Jewish Medieval Neoplatonism. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. Text in context; 3. From human being to discourse on matter?: the three-fold quest for wisdom, goodness, and God - and the root of life in desire; 4. Root desire and the Empedoclean grounding element as love; 5. From Divine Will to Divine Irada : on the mistaken scholarly rejection of Ibn Gabirol's emanation; 6. Iradic Unfoldings: Ibn Gabirol's Hylomorphic Emanationism and the Neoplatonic Tripart Analysis; 7. Matter revisited; 8. Neoplatonic cosmo-ontology as apophatic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Inglis (ed.) (2003). Medieval Philosophy and the Classical Tradition in Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Routledgecurzon.score: 24.0
    The Islamic philosophical tradition was the privileged site for the study and continuation of the Classical philosophical tradition in the Middle Ages. An initial chapter on the history of Islamic philosophy sets the stage for sixteen articles on issues across the Islamic, Jewish and Christian traditions. The goal is to see the Islamic tradition in its own richness and complexity as the context of much Jewish intellectual work. Taken together, these two traditions provide the wider context to which Latin (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Russell Goodman, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    An American essayist, poet, and popular philosopher, Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–82) began his career as a Unitarian minister in Boston, but achieved worldwide fame as a lecturer and the author of such essays as “Self-Reliance,” “History,” “The Over-Soul,” and “Fate.” Drawing on English and German Romanticism, Neoplatonism, Kantianism, and Hinduism, Emerson developed a metaphysics of process, an epistemology of moods, and an “existentialist” ethics of self-improvement. He influenced generations of Americans, from his friend Henry David Thoreau to John (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Shmuel Sambursky (1977). Place and Space in Late Neoplatonism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 8 (3):173-187.score: 24.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. R. F. Hathaway (1969). The neoPlatonist Interpretation of Plato: Remarks on its Decisive Characteristics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 7 (1):19-26.score: 24.0
1 — 50 / 1000