Search results for 'Neural Pathways' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. I. Sukhotinsky, V. Zalkind, J. Lu, D. A. Hopkins, B. Saper & M. Devor (2007). Neural Pathways Associated with Loss of Consciousness Caused by Intracerebral Microinjection of GABA-Sub(A)-Active Anesthetics. European Journal of Neuroscience 25 (5):1417-1436.
     
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  2. Athanassios Raftopoulos (2001). Reentrant Neural Pathways and the Theory-Ladenness of Perception. Philosophy of Science 3 (September):S187-S199.
    In this paper I argue for the cognitive impenetrability of perception by undermining the argument from reentrant pathways. To do that I will adduce psychological and neuropsychological evidence showing that (a) early vision processing is not affected by our knowledge about specific objects and events, and (b) that the role of the descending pathways is to enable the early-vision processing modules to participate in higher-level visual or cognitive functions. My thesis is that a part of observation, which I (...)
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  3. Tjeerd Jellema & Perrett & I. David (2009). Neural Pathways of Social Cognition. In Robin Dunbar & Louise Barrett (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. OUP Oxford
     
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  4. Marc A. Sommer, Peter H. Schiller & Robert M. McPeek (1993). What Neural Pathways Mediate Express Saccades? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):589.
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  5. R. I. Dorsky, D. W. Raible & R. T. Moon (2000). Signaling Pathways and Neural Crest Fate Specification. Bioessays 22:708-716.
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  6. David J. Chalmers (2000). What is a Neural Correlate of Consciousness? In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 17--39.
    The search for neural correlates of consciousness (or NCCs) is arguably the cornerstone in the recent resurgence of the science of consciousness. The search poses many difficult empirical problems, but it seems to be tractable in principle, and some ingenious studies in recent years have led to considerable progress. A number of proposals have been put forward concerning the nature and location of neural correlates of consciousness. A few of these include.
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  7.  70
    Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (2001). Temporal Binding and the Neural Correlates of Sensory Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):16-25.
    Theories of binding have recently come into the focus of the consciousness debate. In this review, we discuss the potential relevance of temporal binding mechanisms for sensory awareness. Specifically, we suggest that neural synchrony with a precision in the millisecond range may be crucial for conscious processing, and may be involved in arousal, perceptual integration, attentional selection and working memory. Recent evidence from both animal and human studies demonstrates that specific changes in neuronal synchrony occur during all of (...)
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  8.  85
    Thomas Metzinger (2000). Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Empirical and Conceptual Questions. MIT Press.
  9.  98
    Gerald M. Edelman & Giulio Srinivasan Tononi (2000). Reentry and the Dynamic Core: Neural Correlates of Conscious Experience. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press
  10.  7
    Vittorio Gallese (2000). The Acting Subject: Toward the Neural Basis of Social Cognition. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 325--333.
  11. Melvyn A. Goodale & K. Murphy (2000). Space in the Brain: Different Neural Substrates for Allocentric and Egocentric Frames of Reference. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press
     
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  12.  1
    Douglas F. Watt & David I. Pincus (2004). Neural Substrates of Consciousness: Implications for Clinical Psychiatry. In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss 75-110.
  13.  8
    D. Schiller & M. R. Delgado (2010). Overlapping Neural Systems Mediating Extinction, Reversal and Regulation of Fear. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (6):268-276.
  14.  14
    Jaak Panksepp (2000). Affective Consciousness and the Instinctual Motor System: The Neural Sources of Sadness and Joy. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization - an Anthology. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins 27-54.
  15.  19
    Olga Pollatos, Klaus Gramann & Rainer Schandry (2007). Neural Systems Connecting Interoceptive Awareness and Feelings. Human Brain Mapping 28 (1):9-18.
  16.  40
    R. C. O'Reilly, R. Busby & R. Soto (2003). Three Forms of Binding and Their Neural Substrates: Alternatives to Temporal Synchrony. In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness. Oxford University Press 168--192.
  17. Andreas K. Engel (2003). Temporal Binding and the Neural Correlates of Consciousness. In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness. Oxford University Press
  18. George I. Viamontes, Bernard D. Beitman, Claudia T. Viamontes & Jorge A. Viamontes (2004). Neural Circuits for Self-Awareness: Evolutionary Origins and Implementation in the Human Brain. In Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (eds.), Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W. Norton & Co 24-111.
  19.  2
    Sven O. E. Ebbesson (1984). Evolution and Ontogeny of Neural Circuits. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (3):321.
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  20.  29
    James R. Hurford (2003). The Neural Basis of Predicate-Argument Structure. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):261-283.
    Neural correlates exist for a basic component of logical formulae, PREDICATE(x). Vision and audition research in primates and humans shows two independent neural pathways; one locates objects in body-centered space, the other attributes properties, such as colour, to objects. In vision these are the dorsal and ventral pathways. In audition, similarly separable “where” and “what” pathways exist. PREDICATE(x) is a schematic representation of the brain's integration of the two processes of delivery by the senses of (...)
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  21. Thomas Metzinger (2000). The Subjectivity of Subjective Experience: A Representationist Analysis of the First-Person Perspective. In Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 285--306.
    This is a brief and accessible English summary of the "Self-model Theory of Subjectivity" (SMT), which is only available as German book in this archive. It introduces two new theoretical entities, the "phenomenal self-model" (PSM) and the "phenomenal model of the intentionality-relation" PMIR. A representationalist analysis of the phenomenal first-person persepctive is offered. This is a revised version, including two pictures.
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  22. Joelle Proust (2000). Awareness of Agency: Three Levels of Analysis. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 307--24.
    This paper discusses the content of agency awareness. It contrast three elements in content: what the goal is, how it is to be reached, and who is having the goal/performing the action ? Marc Jeannerod's claim that goal representations are self-other neutral is discussed. If goal representations are essentially sharable, then we do not understand other people by projecting a piece of internal knowledge on to them, as often assumed. The problem which our brain has to solve is the converse (...)
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  23. Ansgar Beckermann (2000). The Perennial Problem of the Reductive Explainability of Phenomenal Consciousness: C. D. Broad on the Explanatory Gap. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press
    At the start of the 20th century the question of whether life could be explained in purely me- chanical terms was as hotly debated as the mind-body problem is today. Two factions opposed each other: Biological mechanists claimed that the properties characteristic of living organisms could be ex- plained mechanistically, in the way the behavior of a clock can be explained by the properties and the arrangement of its cogs, springs, and weights. Substantial vitalists, on the other hand, maintained that (...)
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  24.  69
    Wolf Singer (2000). Phenomenal Awareness and Consciousness From a Neurobiological Perspective. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 121--137.
  25.  1
    Jackie Andrade (2000). NMDa Receptor--Mediated Consciousness: A Theoretical Framework for Understanding the Effects of Anesthesia on Cognition? In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 271--279.
  26.  2
    Georg Layher, Martin A. Giese & Heiko Neumann (2014). Learning Representations of Animated Motion Sequences—A Neural Model. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):170-182.
    The detection and categorization of animate motions is a crucial task underlying social interaction and perceptual decision making. Neural representations of perceived animate objects are partially located in the primate cortical region STS, which is a region that receives convergent input from intermediate-level form and motion representations. Populations of STS cells exist which are selectively responsive to specific animated motion sequences, such as walkers. It is still unclear how and to what extent form and motion information contribute to the (...)
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  27. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). How to Understand the N in NCC. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press
  28. E. D. Lumer (2000). Binocular Rivalry and Human Visual Awareness. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press
     
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  29. Peter Thier, Thomas Haarmeier, Subhojit Chakraborty, Axel Lindner & Alexander Tikhonov (2002). Cortical Substrates of Visuospatial Awareness Outside the Classical Dorsal Stream of Visual Processing. In Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.), The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect. Oxford University Press 71-81.
     
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  30.  17
    K. Friston (2009). The Free-Energy Principle: A Rough Guide to the Brain? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (7):293-301.
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  31.  10
    G. Northoff & F. Bermpohl (2004). Cortical Midline Structures and the Self. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):102-107.
  32. Magda B. Arnold (1984). Memory and the Brain. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  33.  6
    Mathieu Roy, Daphna Shohamy & Tor D. Wager (2012). Ventromedial Prefrontal-Subcortical Systems and the Generation of Affective Meaning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (3):147-156.
  34.  11
    Alan G. Sanfey, George Loewenstein, Samuel M. McClure & Jonathan D. Cohen (2006). Neuroeconomics: Cross-Currents in Research on Decision-Making. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):108-116.
  35.  7
    N. U. Dosenbach, D. A. Fair, A. L. Cohen, B. L. Schlaggar & S. E. Petersen (2008). A Dual-Networks Architecture of Top-Down Control. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (3):99-105.
  36.  12
    F. Xavier Castellanos & Erika Proal (2012). Large-Scale Brain Systems in ADHD: Beyond the Prefrontal–Striatal Model. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):17-26.
  37.  5
    Roberto Cabeza, Elisa Ciaramelli & Morris Moscovitch (2012). Cognitive Contributions of the Ventral Parietal Cortex: An Integrative Theoretical Account. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (6):338-352.
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  38.  13
    Danielle S. Bassett & Michael S. Gazzaniga (2011). Understanding Complexity in the Human Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (5):200.
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  39.  7
    Rita Z. Goldstein, D. A., Antoine Bechara, Hugh Garavan, Anna Rose Childress, Martin P. Paulus & Nora D. Volkow (2009). The Neurocircuitry of Impaired Insight in Drug Addiction. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (9):372.
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  40.  6
    Theresa M. Desrochers & David Badre (2012). Finding Parallels in Fronto-Striatal Organization. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (8):407.
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  41.  18
    Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett (2007). The Role of the Amygdala in Visual Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (5):190-192.
  42.  82
    Axel Cleeremans (ed.) (2003). The Unity of Consciousness: Binding, Integration, and Dissociation. Oxford University Press.
    Consciousness has many elements, from sensory experiences such as vision and bodily sensation, to nonsensory aspects such as memory and thought. All are presented as experiences of a single subject, and all seem to be contained within a unified field of experience. This unity raises many questions: How do diverse systems in the brain co-operate to produce a unified experience? Are there conditions under which this unity breaks down? Is conscious experience really unified at all? Such questions are addressed in (...)
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  43.  86
    Susan A. Greenfield (2002). Mind, Brain and Consciousness. British Journal of Psychiatry 181 (2):91-93.
  44.  38
    Pavel Ortinski & Kimford J. Meador (2004). Neuronal Mechanisms of Conscious Awareness. Archives of Neurology 61 (7):1017-1020.
  45. Marica Bernstein, Samantha Stiehl & John Bickle (2000). The Effect of Motivation on the Stream of Consciousness: Generalizing From a Neurocomputational Model of Cingulo-Frontal Circuits Controlling Saccadic Eye Movements. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins 133-160.
  46.  10
    Marj Jibu (2002). The Mind-Body and the Light-Matter. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins 33--13.
  47. N. Andreasen (2000). Is Schizophrenia a Disorder of Memory or Consciousness? In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis
  48. Bill Faw (2000). Consciousness, Motivation, and Emotion: Biopsychological Reflections. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization- an Anthology. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins 55-90.
  49.  22
    Joseph E. Bogen (2001). An Experimental Disconnection Approach to a Function of Consciousness. International Journal of Neuroscience 111 (3):135-136.
  50.  20
    Michel T. de Schotten, Marika Urbanski, Hugues Duffau, Emmanuelle Volle, Richard Lévy, Bruno Dubois & Paolo Bartolomeo (2005). Direct Evidence for a Parietal-Frontal Pathway Subserving Spatial Awareness in Humans. Science 309 (5744):2226-2228.
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