Search results for 'Neurobiology Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Rosenberger (2009). Quick-Freezing Philosophy: An Analysis of Imaging Technologies in Neurobiology. In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Evan Selinger & Søren Riis (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Technology. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 126.0
  2. Zachary P. Norwood (2013). A Survey of Artistic Value: From Analytic Philosophy to Neurobiology. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (2):135-152.score: 122.0
    Analytic philosophers have disputed the nature of “artistic value” for over six decades, bringing much needed clarity and rigor to a subject discussed with fashionable obscurity in other disciplines. This essay frames debates between analytic philosophers on artistic value and suggests new directions for future research. In particular, the problem of “intrinsic value” is considered, that is, whether a work’s value derives from its experienced properties, as a work of art, or from cultural trends outside the work’s properties. It is (...)
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  3. John R. Searle (2001). Free Will as a Problem in Neurobiology. Philosophy 76 (298):491-514.score: 102.0
    The problem of free will arises because of the conflict between two inconsistent impulses, the experience of freedom and the conviction of determinism. Perhaps we can resolve these by examining neurobiological correlates of the experience of freedom. If free will is not to be an illusion, it must have a corresponding neurobiological reality. An explanation of this issue leads us to an account of rationality and the self, as well as how consciousness can move bodies at all. I explore two (...)
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  4. Elliott White (1992). The End of the Empty Organism: Neurobiology and the Sciences of Human Action. Praeger.score: 90.0
  5. Ian Gold & Daniel Stoljar (1999). A Neuron Doctrine in the Philosophy of Neuroscience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):809-830.score: 78.0
    It is widely held that a successful theory of the mind will be neuroscientific. In this paper we ask, first, what this claim means, and, secondly, whether it is true. In answer to the first question, we argue that the claim is ambiguous between two views–one plausible but unsubstantive, and one substantive but highly controversial. In answer to the second question, we argue that neither the evidence from neuroscience itself nor from other scientific and philosophical considerations supports the controversial view.
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  6. John R. Searle (2008). Philosophy in a New Century: Selected Essays. Cambridge University Press.score: 66.0
    Introduction -- Philosophy in a new century -- Social ontology : some basic principles (with a new addendum by the author) -- The Turing Test : years later -- Years in the C hinese Room -- Is the brain a digital computer? -- The phenomenological illusion -- The self as a problem in philosophy and neurobiology -- Why I am not a property dualist -- Fact and value, 'is' and 'ought' and reasons for action -- The (...)
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  7. Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.) (2010). Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. State University of New York Press.score: 66.0
    This collection opens a dialogue between process philosophy and contemporary consciousness studies. Approaching consciousness from diverse disciplinary perspectives—philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, neuropathology, psychotherapy, biology, animal ethology, and physics—the contributors offer empirical and philosophical support for a model of consciousness inspired by the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead (1861–1947). Whitehead’s model is developed in ways he could not have anticipated to show how it can advance current debates beyond well-known sticking points. This has trenchant consequences for epistemology and (...)
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  8. Ron Bombardi (2013). On the Neurobiology of Truth. Biosemiotics 6 (3):537-546.score: 66.0
    The concept of truth arises from puzzling over distinctions between the real and the apparent, while the origin of these distinctions lies in the neurobiology of mammalian cerebral lateralization, that is, in the evolution of brains that can address the world both indicatively and subjunctively; brains that represent the world both categorically and hypothetically. After some 2,500 years of thinking about it, the Western philosophical tradition has come up with three major theories of truth: correspondence, coherence, and pragmatist. Traditional (...)
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  9. Richard D. Chessick (1953). Neurological Studies and Philosophical Problems. Philosophy of Science 20 (October):300-312.score: 66.0
     
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  10. Steven E. Landsburg (2009). The Big Questions: Tackling the Problems of Philosophy with Ideas From Mathematics, Economics, and Physics. Free Press.score: 66.0
    The beginning of the journey -- What this book is about : using ideas from mathematics, economics, and physics to tackle the big questions in philosophy : what is real? what can we know? what is the difference between right and wrong? and how should we live? -- Reality and unreality -- On what there is -- Why is there something instead of nothing? the best answer I have : mathematics exists because it must and everything else exists because (...)
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  11. Steven P. R. Rose (1987). Molecules and Minds: Essays on Biology and the Social Order. Open University Press.score: 60.0
  12. Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2010). A Role for Representation in Cognitive Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science (Supplement) 77 (5):875-887.score: 54.0
    What role does the concept of representation play in the contexts of experimentation and explanation in cognitive neurobiology? In this article, a distinction is drawn between minimal and substantive roles for representation. It is argued by appeal to a case study that representation currently plays a role in cognitive neurobiology somewhere in between minimal and substantive and that this is problematic given the ultimate explanatory goals of cognitive neurobiological research. It is suggested that what is needed is for (...)
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  13. Justin Garson (2003). The Introduction of Information Into Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):926-936.score: 54.0
    The first use of the term “information” to describe the content of nervous impulse occurs in Edgar Adrian's The Basis of Sensation (1928). What concept of information does Adrian appeal to, and how can it be situated in relation to contemporary philosophical accounts of the notion of information in biology? The answer requires an explication of Adrian's use and an evaluation of its situation in relation to contemporary accounts of semantic information. I suggest that Adrian's concept of information can be (...)
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  14. Alfredo Pereira Jr (2007). What The Cognitive Neurosciences Mean To Me. Mens Sana Monographs 5 (1):158.score: 54.0
    _Cognitive Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary area of research that combines measurement of brain activity (mostly by means of neuroimaging) with a simultaneous performance of cognitive tasks by human subjects. These investigations have been successful in the task of connecting the sciences of the brain (Neurosciences) and the sciences of the mind (Cognitive Sciences). Advances on this kind of research provide a map of localization of cognitive functions in the human brain. Do these results help us to understand how mind relates (...)
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  15. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2012). Intervention, Causal Reasoning, and the Neurobiology of Mental Disorders: Pharmacological Drugs as Experimental Instruments. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):542-551.score: 50.0
    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories of mental disorders. I (...)
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  16. Walter Glannon (2005). Neurobiology, Neuroimaging, and Free Will. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):68-82.score: 48.0
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  17. Patricia S. Churchland (1986). Neurophilosophy: Toward A Unified Science of the Mind-Brain. MIT Press.score: 48.0
    This is a unique book. It is excellently written, crammed with information, wise and a pleasure to read.' ---Daniel C. Dennett, Tufts University.
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  18. Sean A. Spence (2001). Alien Control: From Phenomenology to Cognitive Neurobiology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):163-172.score: 48.0
  19. Paul M. Churchland (1986). Cognitive Neurobiology: A Computational Hypothesis for Laminar Cortex. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 1 (1):25-51.score: 48.0
    This paper outlines the functional capacities of a novel scheme for cognitive representation and computation, and it explores the possible implementation of this scheme in the massively parallel organization of the empirical brain. The suggestion is that the brain represents reality by means of positions in suitably constitutes phase spaces; and the brain performs computations on these representations by means of coordinate transformations from one phase space to another. This scheme may be implemented in the brain in two distinct forms: (...)
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  20. Daniel J. Gilman (1991). The Neurobiology of Observation. Philosophy of Science 58 (3):496-502.score: 48.0
    Paul Churchland has recently argued that empirical evidence strongly suggests that perception is penetrable to the beliefs or theories held by individual perceivers (1988). While there has been much discussion of the sorts of psychological cases he presents, little has been said about his arguments from neurology. I offer a critical examination of his claim that certain efferents in the brain are evidence against perceptual encapsulation. I argue that his neurological evidence is inadequate to his philosophical goals, both by itself (...)
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  21. William Hirstein (2012). Mindmelding: Consciousness, Neuroscience, and the Mind's Privacy. OUP Oxford.score: 48.0
    Can consciousness and the human mind be understood and explained in sheerly physical terms? Materialism is a philosophical/scientific theory, according to which the mind is completely physical. This theory has been around for literally thousands of years, but it was always stymied by its inability to explain how exactly mere matter could do the amazing things the mind can do. Beginning in the 1980s, however, a revolution began quietly boiling away in the neurosciences, yielding increasingly detailed theories about how the (...)
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  22. Jerome A. Feldman (2006/2008). From Molecule to Metaphor: A Neural Theory of Language. Mit Press.score: 48.0
    A theory that treats language not as an abstract symbol system but as a function of our brains and experience, integrating recent findings from biology, ...
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  23. Germán Gutiérrez (2006). Neurobiología y contenido material universal de la ética: reflexiones a partir del modelo neurobiológico de Antonio Damasio. Utopía y Praxis Latinoamericana 11 (33):9-38.score: 48.0
    Se analiza en este estudio, las implicaciones que para el campo de la ética filosófica comporta el desarrollo de algunas de las investigaciones científicas en el campo de las neurociencias. El organismo humano nunca disocia de manera tajante la razón práctica de la teórica y, por tanto, las dimensio..
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  24. Daniel K. Silber (2010). John R. Searle, Freedom and Neurobiology: Reflections on Free Will, Language, and Political Power Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (1):63-65.score: 48.0
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  25. Hans-Peter Krüger (2010). Gehirn, Verhalten Und Zeit: Philosophische Anthropologie Als Forschungsrahmen. Akademie Verlag.score: 48.0
    Menschenaffen erganzen ihr Instinkt- und Triebleben positivistisch durch individuelle Intelligenz, Sozialitat und Kulturalitat.
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  26. Yoshio Sakurai (2008). Nō No Jōhō Hyōgen o Miru. Kyōto Daigaku Gakujutsu Shuppankai.score: 48.0
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  27. Kenneth F. Schaffner (2008). Theories, Models, and Equations in Biology: The Heuristic Search for Emergent Simplifications in Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):1008-1021.score: 42.0
    This article considers claims that biology should seek general theories similar to those found in physics but argues for an alternative framework for biological theories as collections of prototypical interlevel models that can be extrapolated by analogy to different organisms. This position is exemplified in the development of the Hodgkin‐Huxley giant squid model for action potentials, which uses equations in specialized ways. This model is viewed as an “emergent unifier.” Such unifiers, which require various simplifications, involve the types of heuristics (...)
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  28. Paul M. Churchland (2007). Neurophilosophy at Work. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    In this collection of essays, Paul Churchland explores the unfolding impact of the several empirical sciences of the mind, especially cognitive neurobiology and computational neuroscience on a variety of traditional issues central to the discipline of philosophy. Representing Churchland's most recent research, they continue his research program, launched over thirty years ago, and which has evolved into the field of neurophilosophy.
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  29. Natalie Depraz (2008). The Rainbow of Emotions: At the Crossroads of Neurobiology and Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):237-259.score: 36.0
    This contribution seeks to explicitly articulate two directions of a continuous phenomenal field: (1) the genesis of intersubjectivity in its bodily basis (both organic and phylogenetic); and (2) the re-investment of the organic basis (both bodily and cellular) as a self-transcendence. We hope to recast the debate about the explanatory gap by suggesting a new way to approach the mind-body and Leib/Körper problems: with a heart-centered model instead of a brain-centered model. By asking how the physiological dynamics of heart and (...)
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  30. Marcel Weber (2005). Indeterminism in Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):663-674.score: 36.0
    I examine different arguments that could be used to establish indeterminism of neurological processes. Even though scenarios where single events at the molecular level make the difference in the outcome of such processes are realistic, this falls short of establishing indeterminism, because it is not clear that these molecular events are subject to quantum mechanical uncertainty. Furthermore, attempts to argue for indeterminism autonomously (i.e., independently of quantum mechanics) fail, because both deterministic and indeterministic models can account for the empirically observed (...)
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  31. Noel Boyle (2008). Neurobiology and Phenomenology: Towards a Three-Tiered Intertheoretic Model of Explanation. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (3):34-58.score: 36.0
    Analytic and continental philosophies of mind are too long divided. In both traditions there is extensive discussion of consciousness, the mind-body problem, intentionality, subjectivity, perception (especially visual) and so on. Between these two discussions there are substantive disagreements, overlapping points of insight, meaningful differences in emphasis, and points of comparison which seems to offer nothing but confusion. In other words, there are the ideal circumstances for doing philosophy. Yet, there has been little discourse. This paper invites expanding discourse between (...)
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  32. P. Hadreas (1999). Intentionality and the Neurobiology of Pleasure. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (2):219-236.score: 36.0
  33. Christopher Nichols (1983). Neurobiology and Social Theory: Some Common and Persistent Problems. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 13 (2):207-234.score: 36.0
  34. Richard Corrigan (2008). Freedom and Neurobiology, by John Searle. Philosophy Now 66:40-41.score: 36.0
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  35. Avinash De Sousa (2013). Towards an Integrative Theory of Consciousness: Part 2 (An Anthology of Various Other Models). Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):151.score: 36.0
    The study of consciousness has today moved beyond neurobiology and cognitive models. In the past few years, there has been a surge of research into various newer areas. The present article looks at the non-neurobiological and non-cognitive theories regarding this complex phenomenon, especially ones that self-psychology, self-theory, artificial intelligence, quantum physics, visual cognitive science and philosophy have to offer. Self-psychology has proposed the need to understand the self and its development, and the ramifications of the self for morality (...)
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  36. Oren Harman (2012). Is the Naturalistic Fallacy Dead (and If So, Ought It Be?). Journal of the History of Biology 45 (3):557 - 572.score: 36.0
    Much of modern moral philosophy argued that there are is's in this world, and there are oughts, but that the two are entirely independent of one another. What this meant was that morality had nothing to do with man's biological nature, and could not be derived from it. Any such attempt was considered to be a categorical mistake, and plain foolish. Most philosophers still believe this, but a growing group of neonaturalist thinkers are now challenging their assumptions. Here I (...)
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  37. Elizabeth Laidlaw (2012). Plato's Neurobiology. Philosophy Now 90:18-19.score: 36.0
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  38. A. Sousa (2013). Towards an Integrative Theory of Consciousness: Part 2 (An Anthology of Various Other Models). Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):151.score: 36.0
    The study of consciousness has today moved beyond neurobiology and cognitive models. In the past few years, there has been a surge of research into various newer areas. The present article looks at the non-neurobiological and non-cognitive theories regarding this complex phenomenon, especially ones that self-psychology, self-theory, artificial intelligence, quantum physics, visual cognitive science and philosophy have to offer. Self-psychology has proposed the need to understand the self and its development, and the ramifications of the self for morality (...)
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  39. Alexander Bird, B. D. Ellis & Howard Sankey (eds.) (2012). Properties, Powers, and Structures: Issues in the Metaphysics of Realism. Routledge.score: 36.0
    While the phrase "metaphysics of science" has been used from time to time, it has only recently begun to denote a specific research area where metaphysics meets philosophy of science—and the sciences themselves. The essays in this volume demonstrate that metaphysics of science is an innovative field of research in its own right. The principal areas covered are: (1) The modal metaphysics of properties: What is the essential nature of natural properties? Are all properties essentially categorical? Are they all (...)
     
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  40. Andreas K. Engel & Peter König (1993). Paradigm Shifts in Neurobiology: Towards a New Theory of Perception. In Christopher Hookway (ed.), Philosophy and the Cognitive Sciences. Cambridge University Press. 131--138.score: 36.0
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  41. B. Keeley (2009). The Role of Neurobiology in Differentiating the Senses. In John Bickle (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 226--250.score: 36.0
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  42. Kenneth Aizawa & Carl Gillett (2009). Levels, Individual Variation and Massive Multiple Realization in Neurobiology. In John Bickle (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 539--582.score: 36.0
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  43. Carl Gillett & Aizawa Kenneth (2009). Levels, Individual Variation and Massive Multiple Realization in Neurobiology. In John Bickle (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. oxford university press.score: 36.0
  44. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2007). Neurobiology. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
  45. David Martel Johnson & Christina E. Erneling (eds.) (1997). The Future of the Cognitive Revolution. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    The basic idea of the particular way of understanding mental phenomena that has inspired the "cognitive revolution" is that, as a result of certain relatively recent intellectual and technological innovations, informed theorists now possess a more powerfully insightful comparison or model for mind than was available to any thinkers in the past. The model in question is that of software, or the list of rules for input, output, and internal transformations by which we determine and control the workings of a (...)
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  46. Peter V. Rabins & David M. Blass (2009). Toward a Neurobiology of Personal Identity. In Debra J. H. Mathews, Hilary Bok & Peter V. Rabins (eds.), Personal Identity and Fractured Selves: Perspectives From Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 36.0
  47. Bernhard Waldenfels (2008). The Role of the Lived-Body in Feeling. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (2):127-142.score: 30.0
    Feelings not only have a place, they also have a time. Today, one can speak of a multifaceted renaissance of feelings. This concerns philosophy itself, particularly, ethics. Every law-based morality comes up against its limits when morals cease to be only a question of legitimation and begin to be a question of motivation, since motives get no foothold without the feeling of self and feeling of the alien. As it is treated by various social theories and psychoanalysis, the self (...)
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  48. Zenonas Norkus (2007). Troubles with Mechanisms: Problems of the 'Mechanistic Turn' in Historical Sociology and Social History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2):160-200.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses the prospect of the "new social history" guided by the recent work of Charles Tilly on the methodology of social and historical explanation. Tilly advocates explanation by mechanisms as the alternative to the covering law explanation. Tilly's proposals are considered to be the attempt to reshape the practices of social and historical explanation following the example set by the explanatory practices of molecular biology, neurobiology, and other recent "success stories" in the life sciences. Recent work in (...)
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  49. Adrian Johnston (2013). Drive Between Brain and Subject: An Immanent Critique of Lacanian Neuropsychoanalysis. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (S1):48-84.score: 30.0
    Despite Jacques Lacan's somewhat deserved reputation as an adamant antinaturalist, his teachings, when read carefully to the letter, should not be construed as categorically hostile to any and every possible interfacing of psychoanalysis and biology. In recent years, several authors, including myself, have begun exploring the implications of reinterpreting Lacan's corpus on the basis of questions concerning naturalism, materialism, realism, and the position of analysis with respect to the sciences of today. Herein, I focus primarily on the efforts of analyst (...)
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