Search results for 'Neuron' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  48
    Rachel Wood & Susan A. J. Stuart (2009). Aplasic Phantoms and the Mirror Neuron System: An Enactive, Developmental Perspective. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):487-504.
    Phantom limb experiences demonstrate an unexpected degree of fragility inherent in our self-perceptions. This is perhaps most extreme when congenitally absent limbs are experienced as phantoms. Aplasic phantoms highlight fundamental questions about the physiological bases of self-experience and the ontogeny of a physical, embodied sense of the self. Some of the most intriguing of these questions concern the role of mirror neurons in supporting the development of self–other mappings and hence the emergence of phantom experiences of congenitally absent limbs. In (...)
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  2.  57
    Carl Gillett (2013). Constitution, and Multiple Constitution, in the Sciences: Using the Neuron to Construct a Starting Framework. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 23 (3):309-337.
    Inter-level mechanistic explanations in the sciences have long been a focus of philosophical interest, but attention has recently turned to the compositional character of these explanations which work by explaining higher level entities, whether processes, individuals or properties, using the lower level entities they take to compose them. However, we still have no theoretical account of the constitution or parthood relations between individuals deployed in such explanations, nor any accounts of multiple constitution. My primary focus in this paper is to (...)
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  3. Ian Gold & Daniel Stoljar (1999). A Neuron Doctrine in the Philosophy of Neuroscience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):809-830.
    It is widely held that a successful theory of the mind will be neuroscientific. In this paper we ask, first, what this claim means, and, secondly, whether it is true. In answer to the first question, we argue that the claim is ambiguous between two views–one plausible but unsubstantive, and one substantive but highly controversial. In answer to the second question, we argue that neither the evidence from neuroscience itself nor from other scientific and philosophical considerations supports the controversial view.
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  4.  90
    Jeff Coulter (1995). The Informed Neuron: Issues in the Use of Information Theory in the Behavioral Sciences. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 5 (4):583-96.
    The concept of “information” is virtually ubiquitous in contemporary cognitive science. It is claimed to be “processed” (in cognitivist theories of perception and comprehension), “stored” (in cognitivist theories of memory and recognition), and otherwise manipulated and transformed by the human central nervous system. Fred Dretske's extensive philosophical defense of a theory of informational content (“semantic” information) based upon the Shannon-Weaver formal theory of information is subjected to critical scrutiny. A major difficulty is identified in Dretske's equivocations in the use of (...)
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  5.  2
    Charles Foster (2005). Misrepresentations About Palliative Options and Prognosis in Motor Neurone Disease: Some Legal Considerations. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (1):21-25.
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  6. M. Chirimuuta & I. Gold (2009). The Embedded Neuron, the Enactive Field? In John Bickle (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press
    The concept of the receptive field, first articulated by Hartline, is central to visual neuroscience. The receptive field of a neuron encompasses the spatial and temporal properties of stimuli that activate the neuron, and, as Hubel and Wiesel conceived of it, a neuron’s receptive field is static. This makes it possible to build models of neural circuits and to build up more complex receptive fields out of simpler ones. Recent work in visual neurophysiology is providing evidence that (...)
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  7.  8
    Guillaume Dezecache, Laurence Conty & Julie Grèzes (2013). Social Affordances: Is the Mirror Neuron System Involved? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):417-418.
    We question the idea that the mirror neuron system is the substrate of social affordances perception, and we suggest that most of the activity seen in the parietal and premotor cortex of the human brain is independent of mirroring activity as characterized in macaques, but rather reflects a process of one's own action specification in response to social signals.
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  8. Han Lee & Gregory V. Simpson (2005). Phase Locking of Single Neuron Activity to Theta Oscillations During Working Memory in Monkey Extrastriate Visual Cortex. Neuron 45:147-156.
    activity” has been considered to play a major role in the short-term maintenance of memories. Many studies since then have provided support for this view and greatly advanced our knowledge of the effects of stimulus type and modality on delay activity and its temporal dynamics. In humans, working memory has also been a subject of intense investigation using scalp and intracranial electroencephalography as well as magnetoencephalography, which provide estimates of local population activity. The published findings include reports of systematic changes (...)
     
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  9. Christopher Cherniak, Large-Scale Optimization of Neuron Arbors.
    At the global as well as local scales, some of the geometry of types of neuron arbors—both dendrites and axons—appears to be self-organizing: Their morphogenesis behaves like flowing water, that is, fluid dynamically; waterflow in branching networks in turn acts like a tree composed of cords under tension, that is, vector mechanically. Branch diameters and angles and junction sites conform significantly to this model. The result is that such neuron tree samples globally minimize their total volume—rather than, for (...)
     
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  10.  97
    F. Tito Arecchi (2003). Chaotic Neuron Dynamics, Synchronization, and Feature Binding: Quantum Aspects. Mind and Matter 1 (1):15-43.
    A central issue of cognitive neuroscience is to understand how a large collection of coupled neurons combines external signals with internal memories into new coherent patterns of meaning. An external stimulus localized at some input spreads over a large assembly of coupled neurons, building up a collective state univocally corresponding to the stimulus. Thus, the synchronization of spike trains of many individual neurons is the basis of a coherent perception. Based on recent investigations of homoclinic chaotic systems and their synchronization, (...)
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  11.  61
    Tony Stone & Martin Davies (2000). Autonomous Psychology and the Moderate Neuron Doctrine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):849-850.
    _Two notions of autonomy are distinguished. The respective_ _denials that psychology is autonomous from neurobiology are neuron_ _doctrines, moderate and radical. According to the moderate neuron_ _doctrine, inter-disciplinary interaction need not aim at reduction. It is_ _proposed that it is more plausible that there is slippage from the_ _moderate to the radical neuron doctrine than that there is confusion_ _between the radical neuron doctrine and the trivial version._.
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  12.  71
    John Sutton (1999). The Churchlands' Neuron Doctrine: Both Cognitive and Reductionist. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):850-851.
    According to Gold & Stoljar, one cannot consistently be both reductionist about psychoneural relations and invoke concepts developed in the psychological sciences. I deny the utility of their distinction between biological and cognitive neuroscience, suggesting that they construe biological neuroscience too rigidly and cognitive neuroscience too liberally. Then, I reject their characterization of reductionism. Reductions need not go down past neurobiology straight to physics, and cases of partial, local reduction are not neatly distinguishable from cases of mere implementation. Modifying the (...)
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  13.  5
    Michele Anne Kent (1996). The Ethical Arguments Concerning the Artificial Ventilation of Patients With Motor Neurone Disease. Nursing Ethics 3 (4):317-328.
    This paper focuses on the ethical dilemmas created by advanced technology that would allow patients with motor neurone disease to be sustained by artificial ventilation. The author attempts to support the patient's right to informed choice, arguing from the perspective of autonomy as a first order principle. The counter arguments of caregiver burden and financial restraints are analysed. In the UK, where active euthanasia is not legalized, the dilemma of commencing ventilation is seen to be outweighed by the problems of (...)
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  14.  41
    Vilayanur S. Ramachandran, The Simulating Social Mind: The Role of the Mirror Neuron System and Simulation in the Social and Communicative Deficits of Autism Spectrum Disorders.
    The mechanism by which humans perceive others differs greatly from how humans perceive inanimate objects. Unlike inanimate objects, humans have the distinct property of being “like me” in the eyes of the observer. This allows us to use the same systems that process knowledge about self-performed actions, self-conceived thoughts, and self-experienced emotions to understand actions, thoughts, and emotions in others. The authors propose that internal simulation mechanisms, such as the mirror neuron system, are necessary for normal development of recognition, (...)
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  15.  39
    Alex Byrne (2000). Two Radical Neuron Doctrines. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):833-833.
    G&S describe the radical neuron doctrine in a number of slightly different ways, and we think this hides an important distinction. On the one hand, the radical neuron doctrine is supposed to have the consequence "that a successful theory of the mind will make no reference to anything like the concepts of linguistics or the psychological sciences as we currently understand them", and so Chomskyan linguistics "is doomed from the beginning" (sect. 2.2.2, paras. 2,3).[1] (Note that `a successful (...)
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  16.  34
    Joe Y. F. Lau (1999). A More Substantive Neuron Doctrine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):843-844.
    (1) It is not clear from Gold and Stoljar’s definition of biological neuroscience whether it includes computational and representational concepts. If so, then their evaluation of Kandel’s theory is problematic. If not, then a more direct refutation of the radical neuron doctrine is available. (2) Objections to the psychological sciences might derive not just from the conflation of the radical and the trivial neuron doctrine. There might also be the implicit belief that for many mental phenomena, adequate theories (...)
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  17.  3
    Susan Goetz Zwirn (2015). Butterflies of the Soul: Cajal's Neuron Theory and Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (4):105-119.
    [M]y attention was drawn to the flower garden of the grey matter, which contained cells with delicate and elegant forms, the mysterious butterflies of the soul, the beating of whose wings may someday... clarify the secret of mental life. Art can actually facilitate scientific understanding, even discovery. Art can be, and has been, the entryway to vision and the understanding of natural phenomena as demonstrated in its role in the development of neuron theory. While developing a course on current (...)
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  18.  15
    James Fahey & Michael Zenzen (1999). Reductionism and the Neuron Doctrine: A Metaphysical Fix of Gold & Stoljar's Trivial–Radical Distinction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):835-836.
    The trivial neuron doctrine (TND) holds that psychology merely depends on neurobiology. The radical neuron doctrine (RND) goes further and claims that psychology is superfluous in that neuroscience can “replace it.” Popular among RND notions of “replacement” is “reduction,” and in our commentary we challenge Gold & Stoljar (G&S) to make clear their distinction between merely depends on (TND) and is reducible to (RND). G&S give us a TND–RND distinction that is a distinction without a difference; a defensible (...)
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  19.  16
    Stuart Hameroff (1999). The Neuron Doctrine is an Insult to Neurons. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):838-839.
    As presently implemented, the neuron doctrine (ND) portrays the brain's neurons and chemical synapses as fundamental components in a computer-like switching circuit, supporting a view of brain = mind = computer. However, close examination reveals individual neurons to be far more complex than simple switches, with enormous capacity for intracellular information processing (e.g., in the internal cytoskeleton). Other poorly appreciated factors (gap junctions, apparent randomness, dendritic-dendritic processing, possible quantum computation, the living state) also suggest that the ND grossly oversimplifies (...)
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  20.  11
    Dale Jamieson (1999). The “Trivial Neuron Doctrine” is Not Trivial. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):841-842.
    I argue that the trivial neuron doctrine as characterized by Gold & Stoljar is not trivial; it appears to be inconsistent with property dualism as well as some forms of functionalism and externalism. I suggest that the problem is not so much with the particular way in which Gold & Stoljar draw the distinction as with the unruliness of the distinction itself. Their failure to see this may be why they misunderstand the views of the Churchlands.
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  21.  8
    Barry Horwitz (1999). Neuron Doctrine: Trivial Versus Radical Versus Do Not Dichotomize. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):839-840.
    Gold & Stoljar argue that there are two (often confused) neuron doctrines, one trivial and the other radical, with only the latter having the consequence that non-neuroscientific sciences of the mind will be discarded. They also attempt to show that there is no evidence supporting the radical doctrine. It is argued here that their dichotomy is artificial and misrepresents modern approaches to understanding the neuroscientific correlates of cognition and behavior.
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  22.  11
    Frank Jackson (1999). A Slightly Radical Neuron Doctrine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):840-841.
    The element of truth in behaviorism tells us that some versions of a radical neuron doctrine must be false. However, the representational nature of many mental states implies that neuroscience may well bear on some topics traditionally addressed by philosophers of mind. An example is the individuation of belief states.
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  23.  9
    Steven G. Daniel (1999). How Trivial is the “Trivial Neuron Doctrine”? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):834-835.
    I argue that Gold & Stoljar's “trivial neuron doctrine” is not in fact trivial. Many familiar positions in the philosophy of mind run afoul of it, and it is unclear that even those whom Gold & Stoljar identify as adherents of the trivial neuron doctrine can be comfortably described as such.
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  24.  4
    J. Tim O'Meara (1999). Begging the Question of Causation in a Critique of the Neuron Doctrine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):846-846.
    Gold & Stoljar's argument rejecting the “explanatory sufficiency” of the radical neuron doctrine depends on distinguishing it from the trivial neuron doctrine. This distinction depends on the thesis of “supervenience,” which depends on Hume's regularity theory of causation. In contrast, the radical neuron doctrine depends on a physical theory of causation, which denies the supervenience thesis. Insofar as the target article argues by drawing implications from the premise of Humean causation, whereas the radical doctrine depends on the (...)
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  25. Tito Arecchi (2003). Chaotic Neuron Dynamics, Synchronization, and Feature Binding: Quantum Aspects. Mind and Matter 1 (1):15-43.
    A central issue of cognitive neuroscience is to understand how a large collection of coupled neurons combines external signals with internal memories into new coherent patterns of meaning. An external stimulus localized at some input spreads over a large assembly of coupled neurons, building up a collective state univocally corresponding to the stimulus. Thus, the synchronization of spike trains of many individual neurons is the basis of a coherent perception. Based on recent investigations of homoclinic chaotic systems and their synchronization, (...)
     
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  26. R. W. Davies & Brian J. Morris (eds.) (2006). Molecular Biology of the Neuron. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Nerve cells - neurons - are arguably the most complex of all cells. From the action of these cells comes movement, thought and consciousness. It is a challenging task to understand what molecules direct the various diverse aspects of their function. This has produced an ever-increasing amount of molecular information about neurons, and only in Molecular Biology of the Neuron can a large part of this information be found in one source. In this book, a non-specialist can learn about (...)
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  27. R. Wayne Davies (ed.) (2004). Molecular Biology of the Neuron. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Neurons are arguably the most complex of all cells. From the action of these cells comes movement, thought and consciousness. It is a challenging task to understand what molecules direct the various diverse aspects of their function. This has produced an ever-increasing amount of molecular information about neurons, and only in Molecular Biology of the Neuron can a large part of this information be found in one source. In this book, a non-specialist can learn about the molecules that control (...)
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  28.  5
    Irving Kupfermann & Klaudiusz R. Weiss (1978). The Command Neuron Concept. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):3.
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  29. Zuolei Wang, Yaolin Jiang & Hongli Li (2015). Impulsive Synchronization of Time Delay Bursting Neuron Systems with Unidirectional Coupling. Complexity 21 (2):38-46.
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  30.  13
    Henry T. Greely, Mildred K. Cho, Linda F. Hogle & Debra M. Satz (2007). Thinking About the Human Neuron Mouse. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):27 – 40.
  31.  52
    G. Kreiman, I. Fried & Christof Koch (2002). Single-Neuron Correlates of Subjective Vision in the Human Medial Temporal Lobe. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science Usa 99:8378-8383.
  32.  23
    Nikolaas N. Oosterhof, Steven P. Tipper & Paul E. Downing (2013). Crossmodal and Action-Specific: Neuroimaging the Human Mirror Neuron System. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (7):311-318.
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  33. Robert C. Eaton, Chris M. Wieland & Randolf DiDomenico (1986). Is the Mauthner Cell a Kupfermann & Weiss Command Neuron? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):725.
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  34. John T. Hackett & L. John Greenfield (1986). The Behavioral Role of the Mauthner Neuron Impulse. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):729.
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  35. Istvan Molnar-Szakacs & Lucina Q. Uddin (2013). Self-Processing and the Default Mode Network: Interactions with the Mirror Neuron System. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  36.  41
    Nanthia Suthana & Itzhak Fried (2012). Percepts to Recollections: Insights From Single Neuron Recordings in the Human Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (8):427-436.
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  37.  8
    Mark Sagoff (2007). Further Thoughts About the Human Neuron Mouse. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):51 – 52.
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  38.  85
    Ian Gold & Daniel Stoljar (1999). A Neuron Doctrine in the Philosophy of Neuroscience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):809-830.
    It is widely held that a successful theory of the mind will be neuroscientific. In this paper we ask, first, what this claim means, and, secondly, whether it is true. In answer to the first question, we argue that the claim is ambiguous between two views--one plausible but unsubstantive, and one substantive but highly controversial. In answer to the second question, we argue that neither the evidence from neuroscience itself nor from other scientific and philosophical considerations supports the controversial view.
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  39.  9
    M. Shanahan (2008). A Spiking Neuron Model of Cortical Broadcast and Competition. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):288-303.
    This paper presents a computer model of cortical broadcast and competition based on spiking neurons and inspired by the hypothesis of a global neuronal workspace underlying conscious information processing in the human brain. In the model, the hypothesised workspace is realised by a collection of recurrently inter-connected regions capable of sustaining and disseminating a reverberating spatial pattern of activation. At the same time, the workspace remains susceptible to new patterns arriving from outlying cortical populations. Competition among these cortical populations for (...)
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  40.  1
    William J. Davis (1978). On the Trail of the Command Neuron. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):17.
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  41. Katja U. Likowski, Andreas Mühlberger, Antje B. M. Gerdes, Matthias J. Wieser, Paul Pauli & Peter Weyers (2012). Facial Mimicry and the Mirror Neuron System: Simultaneous Acquisition of Facial Electromyography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  42.  23
    Fred H. Thaheld (2000). Proposed Experiment to Determine If There Are EPR Nonlocal Correlations Between Two Neuron Transistors. Apeiron 7 (3-4):202-205.
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  43.  93
    Ken Mogi (1997). Response Selectivity, Neuron Doctrine, and Mach's Principle in Perception. Austrian Soc. For Cognitive Science Tech Report.
    manner. The construction of the space-time structure that describes the dynamics of the neural network in a causal manner is a non-trivial problem. I critically review the idea of response selectivity as is applied to.
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  44. Alwyn Scott (2000). How Smart is a Neuron? Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (5):70-5.
     
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  45.  10
    Henry T. Greely, Mildred K. Cho, Linda F. Hogle & Debra M. Satz (2007). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Thinking About the Human Neuron Mouse". American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):W4 – W6.
  46.  5
    Cynthia B. Cohen (2007). Beyond the Human Neuron Mouse to the NAS Guidelines. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):46 – 49.
  47.  2
    Chengdai Huang, Ning Li, Jinde Cao & Tasawar Hayat (forthcoming). Dynamical Analysis of a Delayed Six-Neuron BAM Network. Complexity:n/a-n/a.
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  48.  10
    J. Culham (2000). Activation From Neuron to Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):5.
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  49.  3
    Michael Briese, Behrooz Esmaeili & David B. Sattelle (2005). Is Spinal Muscular Atrophy the Result of Defects in Motor Neuron Processes? Bioessays 27 (9):946-957.
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  50.  19
    Christopher Hitchcock (2007). 4 What's Wrong with Neuron Diagrams? In J. K. Campbell, M. O'Rourke & H. S. Silverstein (eds.), Causation and Explanation. MIT Press 4--69.
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