Search results for 'Neurophysiology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Heinrich Weßling (2014). Neurophysiology and the Problem of Human Free Will: A Case of “Nihil Sub Sole Novum”? [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):37-51.score: 16.0
    Over the last decade in Germany, a number of neuroscientists—and among them most prominently Wolf Singer—have claimed to be able to offer scientific evidence derived from neurophysiologic findings to conclusively negate the existence of human free will. In this paper, Singer’s position is examined according to its principal characteristics in order to answer the question whether it is a novel position as opposed to a position pertaining to one of the traditions of western philosophy and anthropology. Furthermore, we try to (...)
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  2. Chris Mortensen (1980). Neurophysiology and Experiences. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (September):250-264.score: 15.0
  3. Adrian Burgess (2007). On the Contribution of Neurophysiology to Hypnosis Research: Current State and Future Directions. In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. 195-219.score: 15.0
  4. A. H. Holway, R. C. Staton & M. J. Zigler (1940). The Neurophysiology of Hearing: I. The Magnitude of Threshold-Stimuli During Recovery From Stimulation-Deafness. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):669.score: 15.0
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  5. Georg Northoff (2002). Neurophysiology, Neuropsychiatry and Neurophilosophy of Catatonia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):592-599.score: 12.0
    The excellent and highly interesting commentaries address the following concerns: (1) neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of catatonia; (2) cognitive-motor deficits in catatonia; (3) conceptual issues; (4) general methodology in neuropsychiatric research; and (5) neurophilosophical implications. The specific problems, issues, and aspects raised by the different commentators are grouped under these categories in Table R1 presented below. These five areas of concern are then discussed in the order listed in the five sections of the Response.
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  6. M. T. Alkire, R. J. Haier & J. H. Fallon (2000). Toward a Unified Theory of Narcosis: Brain Imaging Evidence for a Thalamocortical Switch as the Neurophysiologic Basis of Anesthetic-Induced Unconsciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):370-386.score: 12.0
    A unifying theory of general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness must explain the common mechanism through which various anesthetic agents produce unconsciousness. Functional-brain-imaging data obtained from 11 volunteers during general anesthesia showed specific suppression of regional thalamic and midbrain reticular formation activity across two different commonly used volatile agents. These findings are discussed in relation to findings from sleep neurophysiology and the implications of this work for consciousness research. It is hypothesized that the essential common neurophysiologic mechanism underlying anesthetic-induced unconsciousness is, as (...)
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  7. Don Locke (1974). Action, Movement, and Neurophysiology. Inquiry 17 (1-4):23 – 42.score: 12.0
    Action is to be distinguished from (mere) bodily movement not by reference to an agent's intentions, or his conscious control of his movements (Sect. I), but by reference to the agent as cause of those movements, though this needs to be understood in a way which destroys the alleged distinction between agent-causation and event-causation (Sect. II). It also raises the question of the relation between an agent and his neurophysiology (Sect. III), and eventually the question of the compatibility of (...)
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  8. William J. Clancey (2000). Conceptual Coordination Bridges Information Processing and Neurophysiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):919-922.score: 12.0
    Information processing theories of memory and skills can be reformulated in terms of how categories are physically and temporally related, a process called conceptual coordination. Dreaming can then be understood as a story-understanding process in which two mechanisms found in everyday comprehension are missing: conceiving sequences (chunking categories in time as a higher-order categorization) and coordinating across modalities (e.g., relating the sound of a word and the image of its meaning). On this basis, we can readily identify isomorphisms between dream (...)
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  9. Dirk Hartmann (2004). Neurophysiology and Freedom of the Will. Poiesis and Praxis 2 (4):275-284.score: 10.0
    In the first two sections of the paper, some basic terminological distinctions regarding “freedom of the will” as a philosophical problem are expounded and discussed. On this basis, the third section focuses on the examination of two neurophysiological experiments (one by Benjamin Libet and one by William Grey Walter), which in recent times are often interpreted as providing an empirical vindication of determinism and, accordingly, a refutation of positions maintaining freedom of the will. It will be argued that both experiments (...)
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  10. Michael Hammond (2003). The Enhancement Imperative: The Evolutionary Neurophysiology of Durkheimian Solidarity. Sociological Theory 21 (4):359-374.score: 10.0
    Durkheimian solidarity, especially in regard to religion, is reanalyzed in terms of recent developments in the neurosciences and evolution. Neurophysiological studies indicate that religious arousers can piggyback on reward circuitry established by natural selection for interpersonal attachments. This piggybacking is rooted in uneven evolutionary changes in cognitive capacities, emotional arousal capabilities, and preconscious screening rules for rewarding arousal release. Uneven development means that only a special class of enhanced arousers embedded in macro social structures can tap some of the reservoirs (...)
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  11. Julian O'Kelly, L. James, R. Palaniappan, J. Fachner, J. Taborin & W. L. Magee (2013). Neurophysiological and Behavioural Responses to Music Therapy in Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:884.score: 10.0
    Assessment of awareness for those with disorders of consciousness (DOC) is a challenging undertaking, due to the complex presentation of the population, where misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy may be effective in the assessment and rehabilitation with this population due to effects of musical stimuli on arousal, attention and emotion, irrespective of verbal or motor deficits, however, an evidence base is lacking. To address this, a neurophysiological and behavioural study was undertaken comparing EEG, heart rate variability, respiration and behavioural (...)
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  12. Bjorn Merker (2007). Consciousness Without a Cerbral Cortex: A Challenge for Neuroscience and Medicine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):63-81.score: 9.0
    A broad range of evidence regarding the functional organization of the vertebrate brain – spanning from comparative neurology to experimental psychology and neurophysiology to clinical data – is reviewed for its bearing on conceptions of the neural organization of consciousness. A novel principle relating target selection, action selection, and motivation to one another, as a means to optimize integration for action in real time, is introduced. With its help, the principal macrosystems of the vertebrate brain can be seen to (...)
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  13. Hans-Johann Glock (2006). Thought, Language, and Animals. In Michael Kober (ed.), Deepening Our Understanding of Wittgenstein (Grazer Philosophische Studien, Volume 71, 2006). Rodopi. 139-160.score: 9.0
    This paper discusses Wittgenstein's ideas about the relation between thought, neurophysiology and language, and about the mental capacities of non-linguistic animals. It deals with his initial espousal and later rejection of a 'language of thought', his arguments against the idea that thought requires a medium of images or words, his reasons for resisting the encephalocentric conception of the mind which dominates contemporary philosophy of mind, his mature views about the connection between thought and language, and his remarks about animals. (...)
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  14. P. S. Kitcher (1988). Marr's Computational Theory of Vision. Philosophy of Science 55 (March):1-24.score: 9.0
    David Marr's theory of vision has been widely cited by philosophers and psychologists. I have three projects in this paper. First, I try to offer a perspicuous characterization of Marr's theory. Next, I consider the implications of Marr's work for some currently popular philosophies of psychology, specifically, the "hegemony of neurophysiology view", the theories of Jerry Fodor, Daniel Dennett, and Stephen Stich, and the view that perception is permeated by belief. In the last section, I consider what the phenomenon (...)
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  15. Gary Hatfield (2000). The Brain's 'New' Science: Psychology, Neurophysiology, and Constraint. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):388-404.score: 9.0
    Philosophy of Science, Vol. 67, Supplement. Proceedings of the 1998 Biennial Meetings of the Philosophy of Science Association. Part II: Symposia Papers (Sep., 2000).
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  16. R. L. Barnette (1972). Comments on Neurophysiological Reduction. Theoria 38 (3):143-144.score: 9.0
  17. Anthony Landreth & John Bickle (2008). Neuroeconomics, Neurophysiology and the Common Currency Hypothesis. Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):419-429.score: 9.0
    We briefly describe ways in which neuroeconomics has made contributions to its contributing disciplines, especially neuroscience, and a specific way in which it could make future contributions to both. The contributions of a scientific research programme can be categorized in terms of (1) description and classification of phenomena, (2) the discovery of causal relationships among those phenomena, and (3) the development of tools to facilitate (1) and (2). We consider ways in which neuroeconomics has advanced neuroscience and economics along each (...)
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  18. Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness, Part II: Constraining the Semantic Problem. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):137-58.score: 9.0
  19. Benjamin W. Libet (1993). Neurophysiology of Consciousness: Selected Papers and New Essays. Birkhauser.score: 9.0
    Behav. and Brain Sci., 8, 558-566. Libet, B. (1987). 'Consciousness: Conscious, Subjective Experience.' In Encyclopedia of Neuroscience , ed. G. Adelman. ...
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  20. Max Kistler (2009). Cognition and Neurophysiology: Mechanism, Reduction, and Pluralism. Philosophical Psychology 22 (5):539-541.score: 9.0
    The papers collected in this volume explore some of the powers and limitations of the concept of mechanism for the scientific understanding of cognitive systems, and aim at bringing together some of the most recent developments in the philosophical understanding of the relation of cognition to neuroscience. Earlier versions of most papers have been presented at a workshop held in Paris on June 19th, 2006, which was organized by Institut Jean Nicod and supported by RESCIF (R seau des sciences cognitives (...)
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  21. J. Decety (2002). Neurophysiological Evidence for Simulation and Action. In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.score: 9.0
  22. Alexander Grunewald (1999). Neurophysiology Indicates Cognitive Penetration of the Visual System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):379-380.score: 9.0
    Short-term memory, nonattentional task effects and nonspatial extraretinal representations in the visual system are signs of cognitive penetration. All of these have been found physiologically, arguing against the cognitive impenetrability of vision as a whole. Instead, parallel subcircuits in the brain, each subserving a different competency including sensory and cognitive (and in some cases motor) aspects, may have cognitively impenetrable components.
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  23. Jaap Van Brakel (1993). The Plasticity of Categories: The Case of Colour. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (1):103-135.score: 9.0
    Probably colour is the best worked-out example of allegedly neurophysiologically innate response categories determining percepts and percepts determining concepts, and hence biology fixing the basic categories implicit in the use of language. In this paper I argue against this view and I take C. L. Hardin's Color for Philosophers [1988] as my main target. I start by undermining the view that four unique hues stand apart from all other colour shades (Section 2) and the confidence that the solar spectrum is (...)
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  24. Gary Hatfield (1999). Mental Functions as Constraints on Neurophysiology: Biology and Psychology of Vision. In V. Harcastle (ed.), Where Biology Meets Psychology. 251--71.score: 9.0
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  25. D. Pare & R. Llinas (1995). Conscious and Pre-Conscious Processes as Seen From the Standpoint of Sleep-Waking Cycle Neurophysiology. Neuropsychologia 33:1155-1168.score: 9.0
  26. James P. Henry (1986). Religious Experience, Archetypes, and the Neurophysiology of Emotions. Zygon 21 (1):47-74.score: 9.0
  27. Herbert Feigl (1969). Reduction of Psychology to Neurophysiology? Kagaku Tetsugaku 2:163-184.score: 9.0
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  28. Michael Martin (1971). The Body-Mind Problem and Neurophysiological Reduction. Theoria 37 (1):1-14.score: 9.0
  29. Adrian C. Moulyn (1952). Reflections on the Problem of Time in Relation to Neurophysiology and Psychology. Philosophy of Science 19 (1):33-49.score: 9.0
  30. William L. Rowe (1971). Neurophysiological Laws and Purposive Principles. Philosophical Review 80 (October):502-508.score: 9.0
  31. Joseph E. Bogen (1995). On the Neurophysiology of Consciousness: 1. An Overview. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):52-62.score: 9.0
  32. Oded Ghitza (2011). Linking Speech Perception and Neurophysiology: Speech Decoding Guided by Cascaded Oscillators Locked to the Input Rhythm. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 9.0
    The premise of this study is that current models of speech perception, which are driven by acoustic features alone, are incomplete, and that the role of decoding time during memory access must be incorporated to account for the patterns of observed recognition phenomena. It is postulated that decoding time is governed by a cascade of neuronal oscillators, which guide template-matching operations at a hierarchy of temporal scales. Cascaded cortical oscillations in the theta, beta and gamma frequency bands are argued to (...)
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  33. Ervin Laszlo (1969). Marxism-Leninismvs. Neurophysiology. Studies in East European Thought 9 (2):104-111.score: 9.0
  34. Thomas A. Miller (1985). Insect Neurohormones Insect Neurochemistry and Neurophysiology Alexej B. Borkovec Thomas J. Kelly. Bioscience 35 (5):311-312.score: 9.0
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  35. John A. Teske (2013). From Embodied to Extended Cognition. Zygon 48 (3):759-787.score: 9.0
    Embodied cognitive science holds that cognitive processes are deeply and inescapably rooted in our bodily interactions with the world. Our finite, contingent, and mortal embodiment may be not only supportive, but in some cases even constitutive of emotions, thoughts, and experiences. My discussion here will work outward from the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the brain to a nervous system which extends to the boundaries of the body. It will extend to nonneural aspects of embodiment and even beyond the boundaries (...)
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  36. Giulio Tononi Yuval Nir (2010). Dreaming and the Brain: From Phenomenology to Neurophysiology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):88.score: 9.0
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  37. Britt Anderson & David L. Sheinberg (2010). Neurophysiology of Temporal Orienting in Ventral Visual Stream. In Anna C. Nobre & Jennifer T. Coull (eds.), Attention and Time. Oup Oxford. 407.score: 9.0
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  38. Beverly Bishop (1969). Neurophysiology Readings in Neurophysiology C. D. Barnes C. Kircher. Bioscience 19 (4):378-379.score: 9.0
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  39. Robert G. Colodny (1967). Modern Neurophysiology Charles Scott Sherrington, A Biography of the Neurophysiologist Ragnar Granit. Bioscience 17 (12):927-928.score: 9.0
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  40. Zen Faulkes & Dorothy Hayman Paul (1992). Connecting Invertebrate Behavior, Neurophysiology and Evolution with Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):276-277.score: 9.0
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  41. Marika Berchicci, Federica Menotti, Andrea Macaluso & Francesco Di Russo (2013). The Neurophysiology of Central and Peripheral Fatigue During Sub-Maximal Lower Limb Isometric Contractions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
  42. Peter Ford Dominey (2013). Recurrent Temporal Networks and Language Acquisition—From Corticostriatal Neurophysiology to Reservoir Computing. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 9.0
    One of the most paradoxical aspects of human language is that it is so unlike any other form of behavior in the animal world, yet at the same time, it has developed in a species that is not far removed from ancestral species that do not possess language. While aspects of non-human primate and avian interaction clearly constitute communication, this communication appears distinct from the rich, combinatorial and abstract quality of human language. So how does the human primate brain allow (...)
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  43. Howard Eichenbaum (1981). A Behaviorist in the Neurophysiology Lab. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):480-480.score: 9.0
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  44. Adam Fraczek (1979). Is There Anything New in the Neurophysiology of Aggression for Social Psychologists? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):219-220.score: 9.0
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  45. Steven J. Henriksen (1986). Doubt and Certainty in the Neurophysiology of State. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):408.score: 9.0
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  46. Graham Hoyle (1980). Basic Insect Neurophysiology Insect Neurophysiological Techniques Thomas A. Miller. Bioscience 30 (10):702-703.score: 9.0
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  47. J. F. Iles (1978). The Command Neurone Concept in Mammalian Neurophysiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):25.score: 9.0
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  48. Ervin Laszlo (1969). The Confrontation on Neurophysiology in Hungary. Studies in East European Thought 9 (4):311-333.score: 9.0
  49. Chris Mortensen (1989). Mental Images: Should Cognitive Science Learn From Neurophysiology? In Peter Slezak (ed.), Computers, Brains and Minds. Kluwer. 123--136.score: 9.0
  50. Kiyoshi Nakahara, Yusuke Adachi, Takahiro Osada & Yasushi Miyashita (2007). Exploring the Neural Basis of Cognition: Multi-Modal Links Between Human fMRI and Macaque Neurophysiology. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):84-92.score: 9.0
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