Search results for 'Neurosciences methods' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 80.0
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging from simple (...)
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  2. Bill Faw (2004). Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness: A Review Article. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (2):69-72.score: 54.0
  3. Zhen Yuan & JongChul Ye (2013). Fusion of fNIRS and fMRI Data: Identifying When and Where Hemodynamic Signals Are Changing in Human Brains. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 50.0
  4. Jürgen Zielasek & Wolfgang Gaebel (2008). Modularity in Philosophy, the Neurosciences, and Psychiatry. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):93-108.score: 42.0
    The neurosciences are generating new findings regarding genetic and neurobiological aspects of the pathophysiology of mental disorders. Especially, certain genetic risk factors like neuregulin-1 seem to predispose individuals to a psychotic phenotype beyond the limits of traditional classificatory boundaries between organic psychoses in Alzheimer’s disease, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia. Little, however, is known about how such genetic risk factors actually confer an increased risk for psychosis in an individual patient. A gap between neuroscientific findings and psychopathological phenomena exists. (...)
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  5. Antonia F. De C. Hamilton (2013). Second Person Neuroscience Needs Theories as Well as Methods. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):425-426.score: 40.0
    Advancing second-person neuroscience will need strong theories, as well as the new methods detailed by Schilbach et al. I assess computational theories, enactive theories, and cognitive/information processing theories, and argue that information processing approaches have an important role to play in second-person neuroscience. They provide the closest link to brain imaging and can give important insights into social behaviour.
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  6. Felix Scholkmann, Lisa Holper, Ursula Wolf & Martin Wolf (2013). A New Methodical Approach in Neuroscience: Assessing Inter-Personal Brain Coupling Using Functional Near-Infrared Imaging (fNIRI) Hyperscanning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:813.score: 38.0
    Since the first demonstration of how to simultaneously measure brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on two subjects about 10 years ago, a new paradigm in neuroscience is emerging: the assessment of the inter-brain coupling between two or more subjects, termed “hyperscanning”. The hyperscanning approach has the potential to enable a new view on how the brain works and will reveal as yet undiscovered brain functions based on brain-to-brain coupling, since the single-subject setting cannot capture them. In particular, (...)
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  7. Graham A. Jamieson (ed.) (2007). Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    The phenomenon of hypnosis provides a rich paradigm for those seeking to understand the processes that underlie consciousness. Understanding hypnosis tells us about a basic human capacity for altered experiences that is often overlooked in contemporary western societies. Throughout the 200 year history of psychology, hypnosis has been a major topic of investigation by some of the leading experimenters and theorists of each generation. Today hypnosis is emerging again as a lively area of research within cognitive (systems level) neuroscience informing (...)
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  8. Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.) (2001). Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 36.0
  9. Cornelius Borck (2009). Through the Looking Glass: Past Futures of Brain Research. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (4):329-338.score: 36.0
    The neurosciences seem to thrive on the constantly postponed promise to herald a definitive understanding of the human mind. What are the dynamics of this promise and its postponement? The long and fascinating history of the neurosciences offers ample material for looking into the articulation of neuroscientific research and contemporary culture. New tools and research methods, often announced as breakthroughs, brought along new representations of brain activity. In addition, they shaped the way of conceptualizing the brain’s mode (...)
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  10. Carl Senior & Nick Lee (2013). The State of the Art in Organizational Cognitive Neuroscience: The Therapeutic Gap and Possible Implications for Clinical Practice. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:808.score: 36.0
    In the last decade, researchers in the social sciences have increasingly adopted neuroscientific techniques, with the consequent rise of research inspired by neuroscience in disciplines such as economics, marketing, decision sciences, and leadership. In 2007, we introduced the term organizational cognitive neuroscience (OCN), in an attempt to clearly demarcate research carried out in these many areas, and provide an overarching paradigm for research utilising cognitive neuroscientific methods, theories, and concepts, within the organizational and business research fields. Here we will (...)
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  11. Nicolas Vermeulen, Gordy Pleyers & Martial Mermillod (2013). Second-Person Social Neuroscience: Connections to Past and Future Theories, Methods, and Findings. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):440-441.score: 32.0
    We argue that Schilbach et al. have neglected an important part of the social neuroscience literature involving participants in social interactions. We also clarify some part of the models the authors discussed superficially. We finally propose that social neuroscience should take into consideration the effect of being observed and the complexity of the task as potentially influencing factors.
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  12. Brandon N. Towl (2011). Mind-Brain Correlations, Identity, and Neuroscience. Philosophical Psychology 25 (2):187 - 202.score: 30.0
    One of the positive arguments for the type-identity theory of mental states is an inference-to-the-best-explanation (IBE) argument, which purports to show that type-identity theory is likely true since it is the best explanation for the correlations between mental states and brain states that we find in the neurosciences. But given the methods of neuroscience, there are other relations besides identity that can explain such correlations. I illustrate some of these relations by examining the literature on the function of (...)
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  13. D. Barrell Price & Rainville J. (2002). Integrating Experimental-Phenomenological Methods and Neuroscience to Study Neural Mechanisms of Pain and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):593-608.score: 30.0
  14. P. Janich (2003). Human Nature and Neurosciences: A Methodical Cultural Criticism of Naturalism in the Neurosciences. Poiesis and Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science 2 (1):29-40.score: 30.0
  15. Axel Cleeremans, Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger: A Review of “Computational Explorations in Cognitive Neuroscience”. [REVIEW]score: 30.0
    Just like the sequel to a successful movie, O’Reilly and Munakata’s “Computational Explorations in Cognitive Neuroscience” aims to follow up and expand on the original 1986 “Parallel Distributed Processing” volumes edited by James McClelland, David Rumelhart and the PDP research group. This kinship, which is explicitly recognized by the authors as the book is prefaced by Jay McClelland, is perceptible throughout Computational Explorations: Not only does this volume visit many of the problems and paradigms that the original books were focused (...)
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  16. MachamerPeter (ed.) (2001). Theory and Method in the Neurosciences.score: 30.0
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  17. Peter McLaughlin, Peter Machamer & Rick Grush (eds.) (2001). Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. Pittsburgh University Press.score: 30.0
  18. Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell (eds.) (2011). Educational Neuroscience. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on Contributors.1. Introduction: Educational Neuroscience (Kathryn E. Patten and Stephen R. Campbell).2. Educational Neuroscience: Motivations, methodology, and implications (Stephen R. Campbell).3. Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning? (Anthony E. Kelly).4. A Multiperspective Approach to Neuroeducational Research (Paul A. Howard-Jones).5. What Can Neuroscience Bring to Education? (Michel Ferrari).6. Connecting Education and Cognitive Neuroscience: Where will the journey take us? (Daniel Ansar1, Donna Coch and Bert De Smedt).7. Position Statement on Motivations, Methodologies, and Practical Implications (...)
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  19. Antti Revonsuo (2001). On the Nature of Explanation in the Neurosciences. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Wpress. 45--69.score: 26.0
  20. H. Cruse (2001). The Explanatory Power and Limits of Simulation Models in the Neurosciences. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press. 138--154.score: 26.0
  21. Patrick David Schelenz, Martin Klasen, Barbara Reese, Christina Regenbogen, Dhana Wolf, Yutaka Kato & Klaus Mathiak (2013). Multisensory Integration of Dynamic Emotional Faces and Voices: Method for Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Measurements. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 26.0
    Combined EEG-fMRI analysis correlates time courses from single electrodes or independent EEG components with the hemodynamic response. Implementing information from only one electrode, however, may miss relevant information from complex electrophysiological networks. Component based analysis, in turn, depends on a priori knowledge of the signal topography. Complex designs such as studies on multisensory integration of emotions investigate subtle differences in distributed networks based on only a few trials per condition. Thus, they require a sensitive and comprehensive approach which does not (...)
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  22. W. P. Seeley (2013). Art, Meaning, and Perception: A Question of Methods for a Cognitive Neuroscience of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):443-460.score: 26.0
    Neuroscience of art might give us traction with aesthetic issues. However it can be seen to have trouble modeling the artistically salient semantic properties of artworks. So if meaning really matters, and it does, even in aesthetic contexts, the prospects for this nascent field are dim. The issue boils down to a question of whether or not we can get a grip on the kinds of constraints present and available to guide interpretive behavior in our engagement with works of fine (...)
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  23. Samia Hurst (2010). What 'Empirical Turn in Bioethics'? Bioethics 24 (8):439-444.score: 24.0
    Uncertainty as to how we should articulate empirical data and normative reasoning seems to underlie most difficulties regarding the ‘empirical turn’ in bioethics. This article examines three different ways in which we could understand ‘empirical turn’. Using real facts in normative reasoning is trivial and would not represent a ‘turn’. Becoming an empirical discipline through a shift to the social and neurosciences would be a turn away from normative thinking, which we should not take. Conducting empirical research to inform (...)
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  24. Stephan Hartmann (2001). Mechanisms, Coherence, and Theory Choice in the Cognitive Neurosciences. In Peter McLaughlin, Peter Machamer & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. Pittsburgh University Press.score: 24.0
    Let me first state that I like Antti Revonsuo’s discussion of the various methodological and interpretational problems in neuroscience. It shows how careful and methodologically reflected scientists have to proceed in this fascinating field of research. I have nothing to add here. Furthermore, I am very sympathetic towards Revonsuo’s general proposal to call for a Philosophy of Neuroscience that stresses foundational issues, but also focuses on methodological and explanatory strategies. In a footnote of his paper, Revonsuo complains – as many (...)
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  25. Kerry Lee & Swee Fong Ng (2011). Neuroscience and the Teaching of Mathematics. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):81-86.score: 24.0
    Much of the neuroimaging research has focused on how mathematical operations are performed. Although this body of research has provided insight for the refinement of pedagogy, there are very few neuroimaging studies on how mathematical operations should be taught. In this article, we describe the teaching of algebra in Singapore schools and the imperatives that led us to develop two neuroimaging studies that examined questions of curricular concerns. One of the challenges was to condense issues from classrooms into tasks suitable (...)
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  26. Billy Joe Lucas (2012). The Right to Believe Truth Paradoxes of Moral Regret for No Belief and the Role(s) of Logic in Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (2):115-138.score: 24.0
    I offer you some theories of intellectual obligations and rights (virtue Ethics): initially, RBT (a Right to Believe Truth, if something is true it follows one has a right to believe it), and, NDSM (one has no right to believe a contradiction, i.e., No right to commit Doxastic Self-Mutilation). Evidence for both below. Anthropology, Psychology, computer software, Sociology, and the neurosciences prove things about human beliefs, and History, Economics, and comparative law can provide evidence of value about theories of (...)
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  27. C. D. Chambers & J. B. Mattingley (2005). Neurodisruption of Selective Attention: Insights and Implications. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):542-550.score: 24.0
    Mechanisms of selective attention are vital for coherent perception and action. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience have yielded key insights into the relationship between neural mechanisms of attention and eye movements, and the role of frontal and parietal brain regions as sources of attentional control. Here we explore the growing contribution of reversible neurodisruption techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and microelectrode stimulation, to the cognitive neuroscience of spatial attention. These approaches permit unique causal inferences concerning the relationship between neural processes (...)
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  28. Pierre Poirier & Luc Faucher (2002). Peter K. Machamer, Rick Grush and Peter McLaughlin, Eds., Theory and Method in the Neurosciences Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (6):422-424.score: 24.0
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  29. K. W. M. Fulford (2006). Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Mental health research and care in the twenty first century faces a series of conceptual and ethical challenges arising from unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, combined with radical cultural and organisational change. The Oxford Textbook of Philosophy of Psychiatry is aimed at all those responding to these challenges, from professionals in health and social care, managers, lawyers and policy makers; service users, informal carers and others in the voluntary sector; through to philosophers, neuroscientists and clinical researchers. Organised around a (...)
     
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  30. Markus Junghöfer, Peter Peyk, Tobias Flaisch & Harald T. Schupp (2006). Neuroimaging Methods in Affective Neuroscience: Selected Methodological Issues. In Susana Martinez-Conde, S. L. Macknik, L. M. Martinez, J.-M. Alonso & P. U. Tse (eds.), Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier Science. 123-143.score: 24.0
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  31. Peter K. Machamer, Rick Grush, Peter McLaughlin & Gualtiero Piccinini (2001). Book Reviews-Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. Philosophy of Science 68 (4):584-588.score: 24.0
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  32. Michael I. Posner & Marcus E. Raichle (1995). Interaction of Method and Theory in Cognitive Neuroscience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):372.score: 24.0
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  33. Donald D. Price, James J. Barrell & Pierre Rainville (2002). Integrating Experiential–Phenomenological Methods and Neuroscience to Study Neural Mechanisms of Pain and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):593-608.score: 24.0
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  34. Nilesh S. Tannu & Scott E. Hemby (2006). Methods for Proteomics in Neuroscience. In Susana Martinez-Conde, S. L. Macknik, L. M. Martinez, J.-M. Alonso & P. U. Tse (eds.), Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier Science. 158--41.score: 24.0
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  35. T. Froese, C. Gould & A. Barrett (2011). Re-Viewing From Within: A Commentary on First- and Second-Person Methods in the Science of Consciousness. Constructivist Foundations 6 (2):254-269.score: 22.0
    Context: There is a growing recognition in consciousness science of the need for rigorous methods for obtaining accurate and detailed phenomenological reports of lived experience, i.e., descriptions of experience provided by the subject living them in the “first-person.” Problem: At the moment although introspection and debriefing interviews are sometimes used to guide the design of scientific studies of the mind, explicit description and evaluation of these methods and their results rarely appear in formal scientific discourse. Method: The recent (...)
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  36. Michel le Van Quyen & Antoine Lutz, Comparison of Hilbert Transform and Wavelet Methods for the Analysis of Neuronal Synchrony.score: 22.0
    The quantification of phase synchrony between neuronal signals is of crucial importance for the study of large-scale interactions in the brain. Two methods have been used to date in neuroscience, based on two distinct approaches which permit a direct estimation of the instantaneous phase of a signal [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 (1998) 3291; Human Brain Mapping 8 (1999) 194]. The phase is either estimated by using the analytic concept of Hilbert transform or, alternatively, by convolution with a complex wavelet. (...)
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  37. K. McGee (2006). Enactive Cognitive Science. Part 2: Methods, Insights, and Potential. Constructivist Foundations 1 (2):73-82.score: 22.0
    Purpose: This, the second part of a two-part paper, describes how the concerns of enactive cognitive science have been realized in actual research: methodological issues, proposed explanatory mechanisms and models, some of the potential as both a theoretical and applied science, and several of the major open research questions. Findings: Despite some skepticism about "mechanisms" in constructivist literature, enactive cognitive science attempts to develop cognitive formalisms and models. Such techniques as feedback loops, self-organization, autocatalytic networks, and dynamical systems modeling are (...)
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  38. Rick Grush (2001). The Semantic Challenge to Computational Neuroscience. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press. 155--172.score: 20.0
    I examine one of the conceptual cornerstones of the field known as computational neuroscience, especially as articulated in Churchland et al. (1990), an article that is arguably the locus classicus of this term and its meaning. The authors of that article try, but I claim ultimately fail, to mark off the enterprise of computational neuroscience as an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the cognitive, information-processing functions of the brain. The failure is a result of the fact that the authors provide no (...)
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  39. Zachary Stein & Kurt W. Fischer (2011). Directions for Mind, Brain, and Education: Methods, Models, and Morality. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):56-66.score: 20.0
    In this article we frame a set of important issues in the emerging field of Mind, Brain, and Education in terms of three broad headings: methods, models, and morality. Under the heading of methods we suggest that the need for synthesis across scientific and practical disciplines entails the pursuit of usable knowledge via a catalytic symbiosis between theory, research, and practice. Under the heading of models the goal of producing usable knowledge should shape the construction of theories that (...)
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  40. Cosimo Urgesi Alessio Avenanti, Matteo Candidi (2013). Vicarious Motor Activation During Action Perception: Beyond Correlational Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 20.0
    Neurophysiological and imaging studies have shown that seeing the actions of other individuals brings about the vicarious activation of motor regions involved in performing the same actions. While this suggests a simulative mechanism mediating the perception of others’ actions, one cannot use such evidence to make inferences about the functional significance of vicarious activations. Indeed, a central aim in social neuroscience is to comprehend how vicarious activations allow the understanding of other people’s behavior, and this requires to use stimulation or (...)
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  41. D. A. Engemann, D. Bzdok, S. B. Eickhoff, K. Vogeley & L. Schilbach (2011). Games People Play-Toward an Enactive View of Cooperation in Social Neuroscience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:148-148.score: 20.0
    The field of social neuroscience has made considerable progress in unraveling the neural correlates of human cooperation by making use of brain imaging methods. Within this field, neuroeconomic research has drawn on paradigms from experimental economics, such as the Prisoner’s Dilemma and the Trust Game. These paradigms capture the topic of conflict in cooperation, while focusing strongly on outcome-related decision processes. Cooperation, however, does not equate with that perspective, but relies on additional psychological processes and events, including shared intentions (...)
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  42. Alan Kingstone Evan F. Risko, Kaitlin E. W. Laidlaw, Megan Freeth, Tom Foulsham (2012). Social Attention with Real Versus Reel Stimuli: Toward an Empirical Approach to Concerns About Ecological Validity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 20.0
    Cognitive neuroscientists often study social cognition by using simple but socially relevant stimuli, such as schematic faces or images of other people. Whilst this research is valuable, important aspects of genuine social encounters are absent from these studies, a fact that has recently drawn criticism. In the present review we argue for an empirical approach to the determination of the equivalence of different social stimuli. This approach involves the systematic comparison of different types of social stimuli ranging in their approximation (...)
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  43. Evan F. Risko, Kaitlin Ew Laidlaw, Megan Freeth, Tom Foulsham & Alan Kingstone (2012). Social Attention with Real Versus Reel Stimuli: Toward an Empirical Approach to Concerns About Ecological Validity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 20.0
    Cognitive neuroscientists often study social cognition by using simple but socially relevant stimuli, such as schematic faces or images of other people. Whilst this research is valuable, important aspects of genuine social encounters are absent from these studies, a fact that has recently drawn criticism. In the present review we argue for an empirical approach to the determination of the equivalence of different social stimuli. This approach involves the systematic comparison of different types of social stimuli ranging in their approximation (...)
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  44. Tamara Fischmann, Michael O. Russ & Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber (2013). Trauma, Dream and Psychic Change in Psychoanalyses: A Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and the Neurosciences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:877.score: 19.0
    How can a fruitful dialogue with neuroscientists add knowledge to the unconscious – the specific research object of psychoanalysis? Apparently a growing number of worldwide research groups have begun to realize that the neurosciences and psychoanalysis can benefit from each other in interesting ways. Sometimes empirical studies evoke challenging research questions for both research fields. In the on-going LAC-Depressionstudy, for example, one interesting and unexpected finding for both research fields is that a large majority of chronically depressed in long-term (...)
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  45. Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.) (2005). Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This volume provides an up to date and comprehensive overview of the philosophy and neuroscience movement, which applies the methods of neuroscience to traditional philosophical problems and uses philosophical methods to illuminate issues in neuroscience. At the heart of the movement is the conviction that basic questions about human cognition, many of which have been studied for millennia, can be answered only by a philosophically sophisticated grasp of neuroscience's insights into the processing of information by the human brain. (...)
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  46. William P. Bechtel & Jennifer Mundale (1996). Integrating Neuroscience, Psychology, and Evolutionary Biology Through a Teleological Conception of Function. Minds And Machines 6 (4):481-505.score: 18.0
    The idea of integrating evolutionary biology and psychology has great promise, but one that will be compromised if psychological functions are conceived too abstractly and neuroscience is not allowed to play a contructive role. We argue that the proper integration of neuroscience, psyychology, and evolutionary biology requires a telelogical as opposed to a merely componential analysis of function. A teleological analysis is required in neuroscience itself; we point to traditional and curent research methods in neuroscience, which make critical use (...)
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  47. William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.) (2001). Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    2. Daugman, J. G. Brain metaphor and brain theory 3. Mundale, J. Neuroanatomical Foundations of Cognition: Connecting the Neuronal Level with the Study of Higher Brain Areas.
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  48. Carsten Held, Markus Knauff & Gottfried Vosgerau (eds.) (2006). Mental Models and the Mind: Current Developments in Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. Elsevier.score: 18.0
    "Cognitive psychology," "cognitive neuroscience," and "philosophy of mind" are names for three very different scientific fields, but they label aspects of the same scientific goal: to understand the nature of mental phenomena. Today, the three disciplines strongly overlap under the roof of the cognitive sciences. The book's purpose is to present views from the different disciplines on one of the central theories in cognitive science: the theory of mental models. Cognitive psychologists report their research on the representation and processing of (...)
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  49. Richard P. Cooper & Tim Shallice (2010). Cognitive Neuroscience: The Troubled Marriage of Cognitive Science and Neuroscience. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):398-406.score: 18.0
    We discuss the development of cognitive neuroscience in terms of the tension between the greater sophistication in cognitive concepts and methods of the cognitive sciences and the increasing power of more standard biological approaches to understanding brain structure and function. There have been major technological developments in brain imaging and advances in simulation, but there have also been shifts in emphasis, with topics such as thinking, consciousness, and social cognition becoming fashionable within the brain sciences. The discipline has great (...)
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