Search results for 'Neurosciences methods' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 40.0
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging from simple (...)
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  2. Bill Faw (2004). Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness: A Review Article. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (2):69-72.score: 27.0
  3. Zhen Yuan & JongChul Ye (2013). Fusion of fNIRS and fMRI Data: Identifying When and Where Hemodynamic Signals Are Changing in Human Brains. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 25.0
  4. Antonia F. De C. Hamilton (2013). Second Person Neuroscience Needs Theories as Well as Methods. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):425-426.score: 24.0
    Advancing second-person neuroscience will need strong theories, as well as the new methods detailed by Schilbach et al. I assess computational theories, enactive theories, and cognitive/information processing theories, and argue that information processing approaches have an important role to play in second-person neuroscience. They provide the closest link to brain imaging and can give important insights into social behaviour.
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  5. Graham A. Jamieson (ed.) (2007). Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    The phenomenon of hypnosis provides a rich paradigm for those seeking to understand the processes that underlie consciousness. Understanding hypnosis tells us about a basic human capacity for altered experiences that is often overlooked in contemporary western societies. Throughout the 200 year history of psychology, hypnosis has been a major topic of investigation by some of the leading experimenters and theorists of each generation. Today hypnosis is emerging again as a lively area of research within cognitive (systems level) neuroscience informing (...)
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  6. Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.) (2001). Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 21.0
  7. Jürgen Zielasek & Wolfgang Gaebel (2008). Modularity in Philosophy, the Neurosciences, and Psychiatry. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):93-108.score: 21.0
    The neurosciences are generating new findings regarding genetic and neurobiological aspects of the pathophysiology of mental disorders. Especially, certain genetic risk factors like neuregulin-1 seem to predispose individuals to a psychotic phenotype beyond the limits of traditional classificatory boundaries between organic psychoses in Alzheimer’s disease, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia. Little, however, is known about how such genetic risk factors actually confer an increased risk for psychosis in an individual patient. A gap between neuroscientific findings and psychopathological phenomena exists. (...)
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  8. Felix Scholkmann, Lisa Holper, Ursula Wolf & Martin Wolf (2013). A New Methodical Approach in Neuroscience: Assessing Inter-Personal Brain Coupling Using Functional Near-Infrared Imaging (fNIRI) Hyperscanning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:813.score: 19.0
    Since the first demonstration of how to simultaneously measure brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on two subjects about 10 years ago, a new paradigm in neuroscience is emerging: the assessment of the inter-brain coupling between two or more subjects, termed “hyperscanning”. The hyperscanning approach has the potential to enable a new view on how the brain works and will reveal as yet undiscovered brain functions based on brain-to-brain coupling, since the single-subject setting cannot capture them. In particular, (...)
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  9. Tamara Fischmann, Michael O. Russ & Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber (2013). Trauma, Dream and Psychic Change in Psychoanalyses: A Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and the Neurosciences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:877.score: 19.0
    How can a fruitful dialogue with neuroscientists add knowledge to the unconscious – the specific research object of psychoanalysis? Apparently a growing number of worldwide research groups have begun to realize that the neurosciences and psychoanalysis can benefit from each other in interesting ways. Sometimes empirical studies evoke challenging research questions for both research fields. In the on-going LAC-Depressionstudy, for example, one interesting and unexpected finding for both research fields is that a large majority of chronically depressed in long-term (...)
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  10. Nicolas Vermeulen, Gordy Pleyers & Martial Mermillod (2013). Second-Person Social Neuroscience: Connections to Past and Future Theories, Methods, and Findings. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):440-441.score: 19.0
    We argue that Schilbach et al. have neglected an important part of the social neuroscience literature involving participants in social interactions. We also clarify some part of the models the authors discussed superficially. We finally propose that social neuroscience should take into consideration the effect of being observed and the complexity of the task as potentially influencing factors.
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  11. William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.) (2001). Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell.score: 18.0
    2. Daugman, J. G. Brain metaphor and brain theory 3. Mundale, J. Neuroanatomical Foundations of Cognition: Connecting the Neuronal Level with the Study of Higher Brain Areas.
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  12. Desh Raj Sirswal (2012). Methods of Philosophical Inquiry in Upanishads. International Journal of Multidisciplinary Educational Research 1 (2):57-62.score: 18.0
    Philosophy is a subject which does not concerned only to an expert or specialist. It appears that there is probably no human being who does not philosophise. Good philosophy expands one’s imagination as some philosophy is close to us, whoever we are. Then of course some is further away, and some is further still, and some is very alien indeed. We raise questions about the assumptions, presuppositions, or definitions upon which a field of inquiry is based, and these questions can (...)
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  13. T. Barakat & H. A. Alhendi (2013). Generalized Dirac Equation with Induced Energy-Dependent Potential Via Simple Similarity Transformation and Asymptotic Iteration Methods. Foundations of Physics 43 (10):1171-1181.score: 18.0
    This study shows how precise simple analytical solutions for the generalized Dirac equation with repulsive vector and attractive energy-dependent Lorentz scalar potentials, position-dependent mass potential, and a tensor interaction term can be obtained within the framework of both similarity transformation and the asymptotic iteration methods. These methods yield a significant improvement over existing approaches and provide more plausible and applicable ways in explaining the pseudospin symmetry’s breaking mechanism in nuclei.
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  14. Fenna van Nes (2011). Mathematics Education and Neurosciences: Towards Interdisciplinary Insights Into the Development of Young Children's Mathematical Abilities. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):75-80.score: 18.0
    The Mathematics Education and Neurosciences project is an interdisciplinary research program that bridges mathematics education research with neuroscientific research. The bidirectional collaboration will provide greater insight into young children's (aged four to six years) mathematical abilities. Specifically, by combining qualitative ‘design research’ with quantitative ‘experimental research’, we aim to come to a more thorough understanding of prerequisites that are involved in the development of early spatial and number sense. The mathematics education researchers are concerned with kindergartner's spatial structuring ability, (...)
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  15. Elaine Doyle, Jane Frecknall-Hughes & Barbara Summers (2009). Research Methods in Taxation Ethics: Developing the Defining Issues Test (Dit) for a Tax-Specific Scenario. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):35 - 52.score: 18.0
    This paper reports on the development of a research instrument designed to explore ethical reasoning in a tax context. This research instrument is a version of the Defining Issues Test (DIT) originally developed by Rest [1979a, Development in Judging Moral Issues (Univer sity of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, MN); 1979b, Defining Issues Test (University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, MN)], but adapted to focus specifically on the environment encountered by tax practitioners. The paper explores reasons for developing a context-(and profession-) specific test, (...)
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  16. D. Barrell Price & Rainville J. (2002). Integrating Experimental-Phenomenological Methods and Neuroscience to Study Neural Mechanisms of Pain and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):593-608.score: 18.0
  17. Ulysses Paulino Albuquerque (2011). Local Perception of Environmental Change in a Semi-Arid Area of Northeast Brazil: A New Approach for the Use of Participatory Methods at the Level of Family Units. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):511-531.score: 18.0
    The diversity of plant resources in the Brazilian semi-arid region is being compromised by practices related to agriculture, pastures, and forest harvesting, especially in areas containing Caatinga vegetation (xeric shrublands and thorn forests). The impact of these practices constitutes a series of complex factors involving local issues, creating a need for further scientific studies on the social-environmental dynamics of natural resource use. Through participatory methods, the present study analyzed people’s representations about local environmental change processes in the Brazilian semi-arid (...)
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  18. Patricia Hansen-Ketchum & Florence Myrick (2008). Photo Methods for Qualitative Research in Nursing: An Ontological and Epistemological Perspective. Nursing Philosophy 9 (3):205-213.score: 18.0
    Abstract The use of photo research methods is influenced by underlying ontological and epistemological assumptions. Variant assumptions about reality and knowledge converge to conceive a relationship between the knower and what can be known. These assumptions provide the rationale for decided ways of engaging participants in the process of scientific inquiry. In this paper, we examine how perspectives of realism and relativism may shape epistemological understandings and influence type and use of photo methods in qualitative research. Based on (...)
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  19. Uljana Feest (forthcoming). Phenomenal Experiences, First-Person Methods, and the Artificiality of Experimental Data. Philosophy of Science.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that whereas philosophical discussions of first-person methods often turn on the veridicality of first-person reports, more attention should be paid to the experimental circumstances under which the reports are generated, and to the purposes of designing such experiments. After pointing to the ‘constructedness’ of first-person reports in the science of perception, I raise questions about the criteria by which to judge whether the reports illuminate something about the nature of perception. I illustrate this point with a (...)
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  20. Rebecca L. Walker & Clair Morrissey (2013). Bioethics Methods in the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of the Human Genome Project Literature. Bioethics 28 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 18.0
    While bioethics as a field has concerned itself with methodological issues since the early years, there has been no systematic examination of how ethics is incorporated into research on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. Yet ELSI research may bear a particular burden of investigating and substantiating its methods given public funding, an explicitly cross-disciplinary approach, and the perceived significance of adequate responsiveness to advances in genomics. We undertook a qualitative content analysis of (...)
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  21. P. Janich (2003). Human Nature and Neurosciences: A Methodical Cultural Criticism of Naturalism in the Neurosciences. Poiesis and Praxis: International Journal of Technology Assessment and Ethics of Science 2 (1):29-40.score: 18.0
  22. Shana Sieber, Patrícia Medeiros & Ulysses Albuquerque (2011). Local Perception of Environmental Change in a Semi-Arid Area of Northeast Brazil: A New Approach for the Use of Participatory Methods at the Level of Family Units. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):511-531.score: 18.0
    The diversity of plant resources in the Brazilian semi-arid region is being compromised by practices related to agriculture, pastures, and forest harvesting, especially in areas containing Caatinga vegetation (xeric shrublands and thorn forests). The impact of these practices constitutes a series of complex factors involving local issues, creating a need for further scientific studies on the social-environmental dynamics of natural resource use. Through participatory methods, the present study analyzed people’s representations about local environmental change processes in the Brazilian semi-arid (...)
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  23. Cornelius Borck (2009). Through the Looking Glass: Past Futures of Brain Research. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 1 (4):329-338.score: 18.0
    The neurosciences seem to thrive on the constantly postponed promise to herald a definitive understanding of the human mind. What are the dynamics of this promise and its postponement? The long and fascinating history of the neurosciences offers ample material for looking into the articulation of neuroscientific research and contemporary culture. New tools and research methods, often announced as breakthroughs, brought along new representations of brain activity. In addition, they shaped the way of conceptualizing the brain’s mode (...)
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  24. Birutė Pranevičienė & Aurelija Pūraitė (2010). The Financing Methods of Higher Education System. Jurisprudence 122 (4):335-356.score: 18.0
    The need to examine the efficiency of state financing of universities is becoming more important for a number of reasons. The growth in the social demand for higher education, the globalization and internationalization of the higher education system, the recognition of the need to improve the quality of studies coincide with the financing aspects of activities of higher education institutions. The object of the research is to analyze the financing models and state funding methods of the higher education system (...)
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  25. Nicholas Altieri (2013). Audiovisual Integration: An Introduction to Behavioral and Neuro-Cognitive Methods. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Audiovisual integration: an introduction to behavioral and neuro-cognitive methods.
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  26. Dan S. Felsenthal & Nicolaus Tideman (2013). Varieties of Failure of Monotonicity and Participation Under Five Voting Methods. Theory and Decision 75 (1):59-77.score: 18.0
    In voting theory, monotonicity is the axiom that an improvement in the ranking of a candidate by voters cannot cause a candidate who would otherwise win to lose. The participation axiom states that the sincere report of a voter’s preferences cannot cause an outcome that the voter regards as less attractive than the one that would result from the voter’s non-participation. This article identifies three binary distinctions in the types of circumstances in which failures of monotonicity or participation can occur. (...)
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  27. Yvonne J. F. M. Jansen & Antoinette A. De Bont (2010). The Role of Screenings Methods and Risk Profile Assessments in Prevention and Health Promotion Programmes: An Ethnographic Analysis. Health Care Analysis 18 (4):389-401.score: 18.0
    In prevention and health promotion interventions, screening methods and risk profile assessments are often used as tools for establishing the interventions’ effectiveness, for the selection and determination of the health status of participants. The role these instruments fulfil in the creation of effectiveness and the effects these instruments have themselves remain unexplored. In this paper, we have analysed the role screening methods and risk profile assessments fulfil as part of prevention and health promotion programmes in the selection, enrolment (...)
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  28. Michael D. Kaplowitz (2000). Identifying Ecosystem Services Using Multiple Methods: Lessons From the Mangrove Wetlands of Yucatan, Mexico. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 17 (2):169-179.score: 18.0
    The failure to properly account forthe total value of environmental and natural resourcesresults in socially undesirable overexploitation anddegradation of complex ecosystems such as mangrovewetlands. However, most ecosystem valuation researchtoo often focuses on the question of “what is the value” and not enough on “what peoplevalue.” Nonmarket valuation practitioners have usedqualitative approaches in their work for some time.Yet, the relative strengths and weaknesses ofdifferent qualitative methods have been more thesubject of speculation than systematic research. Thestatistical examination of focus group and (...)
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  29. MachamerPeter (ed.) (2001). Theory and Method in the Neurosciences.score: 18.0
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  30. Peter McLaughlin, Peter Machamer & Rick Grush (eds.) (2001). Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. Pittsburgh University Press.score: 18.0
  31. Mark Purdon (2013). Land Acquisitions in Tanzania: Strong Sustainability, Weak Sustainability and the Importance of Comparative Methods. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1127-1156.score: 18.0
    This paper distinguished different analytical approaches to the evaluation of the sustainability of large-scale land acquisitions—at both the conceptual and methodological levels. First, at the conceptual level, evaluation of the sustainability of land acquisitions depends on what definition of sustainability is adopted—strong or weak sustainability. Second, a lack of comparative empirical methods in many studies has limited the identification of causal factors affecting sustainability. An empirical investigation into the sustainability of land acquisitions in Tanzania that employs these existing concepts (...)
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  32. Carl Senior & Nick Lee (2013). The State of the Art in Organizational Cognitive Neuroscience: The Therapeutic Gap and Possible Implications for Clinical Practice. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:808.score: 18.0
    In the last decade, researchers in the social sciences have increasingly adopted neuroscientific techniques, with the consequent rise of research inspired by neuroscience in disciplines such as economics, marketing, decision sciences, and leadership. In 2007, we introduced the term organizational cognitive neuroscience (OCN), in an attempt to clearly demarcate research carried out in these many areas, and provide an overarching paradigm for research utilising cognitive neuroscientific methods, theories, and concepts, within the organizational and business research fields. Here we will (...)
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  33. Marco Slikker, Peter Borm & René van den Brink (2012). Internal Slackening Scoring Methods. Theory and Decision 72 (4):445-462.score: 18.0
    We deal with the ranking problem of the nodes in a directed graph. The bilateral relationships specified by a directed graph may reflect the outcomes of a sport competition, the mutual reference structure between websites, or a group preference structure over alternatives. We introduce a class of scoring methods for directed graphs, indexed by a single nonnegative parameter α. This parameter reflects the internal slackening of a node within an underlying iterative process. The class of so-called internal slackening scoring (...)
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  34. Elizabeth Clare Temple & Rhonda Frances Brown (2012). A Comparison of Internet-Based Participant Recruitment Methods: Engaging the Hidden Population of Cannabis Users in Research. Journal of Research Practice 7 (2):Article - D2.score: 18.0
    While a growing number of researchers are embracing Internet-based data collection methods, the adoption of Internet-based recruitment methods has been relatively slow. This may be because little is known regarding the relative strengths and weaknesses of different methods of Internet-based participant recruitment, nor how these different recruitment strategies impact on the data collected. These issues are addressed in this article with reference to a study comparing the effectiveness of three Internet-based strategies in recruiting cannabis users for an (...)
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  35. Bram van Heuveln (2000). A Preferred Treatment of Mill's Methods: Some Misinterpretations by Modern Textbooks. Informal Logic 20 (1):19-42.score: 18.0
    A number of modern logic books give a misrepresentation of Mill's Methods as originally conceived by Mill. In this paper, I point out what I believe is a better presentation of Mill's Methods. This treatment is not only historically more accurate, but it also represents a better conceptual introduction to Mill's Methods in general.
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  36. Rudolf Vetschera & D. Marc Kilgour (forthcoming). Fair Division of Indivisible Items Between Two Players: Design Parameters for Contested Pile Methods. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision:1-26.score: 18.0
    Contested Pile methods are two-phase procedures for the fair allocation of indivisible items to two players. In the Generation Phase, items over which the players’ preferences differ widely enough are allocated. “Contested” items are placed in the Contested Pile, which is then allocated in the Splitting Phase. Each phase can be carried out using several different techniques; we perform a comprehensive analysis of the resulting design variants using a computational model. The properties of fairness and efficiency, generally achieved in (...)
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  37. Andy Williamson (2010). Using Mixed Methods to Discover Emergent Patterns of Local eDemocracy. AI and Society 25 (3):321-333.score: 18.0
    Research in an emergent field requires the researcher to consider appropriate methodologies. This paper describes research that attempts to discover how new technologies can influence local democratic engagement. It describes an interpretive research project informed by critical social theory that uses an explanatory mixed methods approach, combining two sequential data collection methods. The study incorporates a survey instrument and qualitative interviewing, analysed using Grounded Theory Methodology. The paper will describe the context for the research, the choice of a (...)
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  38. H. Cruse (2001). The Explanatory Power and Limits of Simulation Models in the Neurosciences. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Press. 138--154.score: 17.0
  39. Antti Revonsuo (2001). On the Nature of Explanation in the Neurosciences. In Peter K. Machamer, Peter McLaughlin & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. University of Pittsburgh Wpress. 45--69.score: 17.0
  40. Stephan Hartmann (2001). Mechanisms, Coherence, and Theory Choice in the Cognitive Neurosciences. In Peter McLaughlin, Peter Machamer & Rick Grush (eds.), Theory and Method in the Neurosciences. Pittsburgh University Press.score: 16.0
    Let me first state that I like Antti Revonsuo’s discussion of the various methodological and interpretational problems in neuroscience. It shows how careful and methodologically reflected scientists have to proceed in this fascinating field of research. I have nothing to add here. Furthermore, I am very sympathetic towards Revonsuo’s general proposal to call for a Philosophy of Neuroscience that stresses foundational issues, but also focuses on methodological and explanatory strategies. In a footnote of his paper, Revonsuo complains – as many (...)
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  41. Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (2003). Self-Consciousness: An Integrative Approach From Philosophy, Psychopathology and the Neurosciences. In Tilo Kircher & Anthony S. David (eds.), The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry. Cambridge University Press. 445-473.score: 16.0
  42. Brandon N. Towl (2011). Mind-Brain Correlations, Identity, and Neuroscience. Philosophical Psychology 25 (2):187 - 202.score: 15.0
    One of the positive arguments for the type-identity theory of mental states is an inference-to-the-best-explanation (IBE) argument, which purports to show that type-identity theory is likely true since it is the best explanation for the correlations between mental states and brain states that we find in the neurosciences. But given the methods of neuroscience, there are other relations besides identity that can explain such correlations. I illustrate some of these relations by examining the literature on the function of (...)
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  43. T. Froese, C. Gould & A. Barrett (2011). Re-Viewing From Within: A Commentary on First- and Second-Person Methods in the Science of Consciousness. Constructivist Foundations 6 (2):254-269.score: 15.0
    Context: There is a growing recognition in consciousness science of the need for rigorous methods for obtaining accurate and detailed phenomenological reports of lived experience, i.e., descriptions of experience provided by the subject living them in the “first-person.” Problem: At the moment although introspection and debriefing interviews are sometimes used to guide the design of scientific studies of the mind, explicit description and evaluation of these methods and their results rarely appear in formal scientific discourse. Method: The recent (...)
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  44. Alan Gregory & Julie Whittaker (2013). Exploring the Valuation of Corporate Social Responsibility—A Comparison of Research Methods. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):1-20.score: 15.0
    This paper argues the case that tests of how investors value corporate social performance (CSP) based upon realised stock market returns are liable to be weak tests if markets are efficient and firms change CSP policies infrequently. We provide a theoretical explanation of why this will be the case using examples to illustrate. Subsequently, we set out an alternative theoretical framework for the purposes of investigating whether markets place a positive, or a negative, valuation on CSP, and show why this (...)
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  45. Fredrick J. Wertz (1999). Multiple Methods in Psychology: Epistemological Grounding and the Possibility of Unity. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):131-166.score: 15.0
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  46. Axel Cleeremans, Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger: A Review of “Computational Explorations in Cognitive Neuroscience”. [REVIEW]score: 15.0
    Just like the sequel to a successful movie, O’Reilly and Munakata’s “Computational Explorations in Cognitive Neuroscience” aims to follow up and expand on the original 1986 “Parallel Distributed Processing” volumes edited by James McClelland, David Rumelhart and the PDP research group. This kinship, which is explicitly recognized by the authors as the book is prefaced by Jay McClelland, is perceptible throughout Computational Explorations: Not only does this volume visit many of the problems and paradigms that the original books were focused (...)
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  47. Michel le Van Quyen & Antoine Lutz, Comparison of Hilbert Transform and Wavelet Methods for the Analysis of Neuronal Synchrony.score: 15.0
    The quantification of phase synchrony between neuronal signals is of crucial importance for the study of large-scale interactions in the brain. Two methods have been used to date in neuroscience, based on two distinct approaches which permit a direct estimation of the instantaneous phase of a signal [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 (1998) 3291; Human Brain Mapping 8 (1999) 194]. The phase is either estimated by using the analytic concept of Hilbert transform or, alternatively, by convolution with a complex wavelet. (...)
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  48. Richard L. Patten (1973). Facilitation Effect of Incomplete Reward Reduction in Discrimination: Comparison of Within-Subject and Between-Subject Methods. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):185.score: 15.0
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  49. George E. Briggs & James C. Naylor (1962). The Relative Efficiency of Several Training Methods as a Function of Transfer Task Complexity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (5):505.score: 15.0
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