Search results for 'New Zealand' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gillett - New Zealand (2003). Form and Content: The Role of Discourse in Mental Disorder. In Bill Fulford, Katherine Morris, John Z. Sadler & Giovanni Stanghellini (eds.), Nature and Narrative: An Introduction to the New Philosophy of Psychiatry. Oup Oxford.score: 300.0
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  2. Charles Pigden (2011). Getting the Wrong Anderson? A Short and Opinionated History of New Zealand Philosophy. In Graham Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The Antipodean Philosopher: Public Lectures on Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Lexington Books. 169-195.score: 270.0
    Is the history of philosophy primarily a contribution to PHILOSOPHY or primarily a contribution to HISTORY? This paper is primarily contribution to history (specifically the history of New Zealand) but although the history of philosophy has been big in New Zealand, most NZ philosophers with a historical bent are primarily interested in the history of philosophy as a contribution to philosophy. My essay focuses on two questions: 1) How did New Zealand philosophy get to be so good? (...)
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  3. Aimee Bryant (2011). Consent, Autonomy, and the Benefits of Healthy Limb Amputation: Examining the Legality of Surgically Managing Body Integrity Identity Disorder in New Zealand. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):281-288.score: 240.0
    Upon first consideration, the desire of an individual to amputate a seemingly healthy limb is a foreign, perhaps unsettling, concept. It is, however, a reality faced by those who suffer from body integrity identity disorder (BIID). In seeking treatment, these individuals request surgery that challenges both the statutory provisions that sanction surgical operations and the limits of consent as a defence in New Zealand. In doing so, questions as to the influence of public policy and the extent of personal (...)
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  4. Xiaoping Jiang (2010). A Probe Into the Internationalisation of Higher Education in the New Zealand Context. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (8):881-897.score: 240.0
    This paper presents a model of practice for analysing the internationalisation of higher education, and for better providing teaching service and support to both the internal and external other. It is derived from the theoretical analysis of the rationales, concepts and developments of the internationalisation of higher education, and from a New Zealand case study that exemplifies the current trend in the internationalisation of higher education—a shift from aid to trade. In the paper, the author examines the impacts of (...)
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  5. Peter Roberts (2009). A New Patriotism? Neoliberalism, Citizenship and Tertiary Education in New Zealand. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (4):410-423.score: 240.0
    This paper argues that a new patriotism has emerged in New Zealand over recent years. This has been promoted in tandem with the notion of advancing New Zealand as a knowledge economy and society. The new patriotism encourages New Zealanders to accept, indeed embrace, a single, shared vision of the future: one structured by a neoliberal ontology and the demands of global capitalism. This constructs a narrow view of citizenship and reduces the possibility of economic and social alternatives (...)
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  6. Robert Keith Shaw (1979). New Zealand's Recent Concern with Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 9 (1):23-35.score: 240.0
    References to moral education in New Zealand over the last fifteen years are traced through official and semi-official government reports, teachers’ publications, and other sources. It is argued that since 1962 there has been an increasing awareness of and concern with moral education. -/- The significance of the Commission on Education in New Zealand in 1962 stressed that New Zealand schools’ prime responsibility was for intellectual education, although they should also be concerned with physical, emotional, and moral (...)
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  7. Michael C. Morris (2009). The Ethics and Politics of Animal Welfare in New Zealand: Broiler Chicken Production as a Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):15-30.score: 240.0
    The cause of poor welfare in broilers is multifactorial, but genotype is a major contributor. Modern broilers have been bred for rapid growth, and this leads to increases in lameness and ascites as the legs and hearts of the heavier birds find it difficult to cope with the extra demands placed on them. Visible lameness indicative of pain is more common in New Zealand than in Europe. The government, however, insists that New Zealand welfare standards are higher than (...)
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  8. Gregory Liyanarachchi & Chris Newdick (2009). The Impact of Moral Reasoning and Retaliation on Whistle-Blowing: New Zealand Evidence. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):37 - 57.score: 240.0
    This study examined experimentally the effect of retaliation strength and accounting students’ level of moral reasoning, on their propensity to blow the whistle (PBW) when faced with a serious wrongdoing. Fifty-one senior accounting students enrolled in an auditing course offered by a large New Zealand university participated in the study. Participants responded to three hypothetical whistle-blowing scenarios and completed an instrument that measured moral reasoning (Welton et al., 1994, Accounting Education . International Journal (Toronto, Ont.) 3 (1), 35–50) on (...)
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  9. Sean A. Weaver (2006). Chronic Toxicity of 1080 and its Implications for Conservation Management: A New Zealand Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (4):367-389.score: 240.0
    Sodium monofluoroacetate (1080) is a mammalian pesticide used in different parts of the world for the control of mammalian pest species. In New Zealand it is used extensively and very successfully as a conservation management tool for the control of brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) – an introduced marsupial that has become a substantial agricultural and conservation management pest. Possums pose a threat to cattle farming in New Zealand as they are a vector for bovine tuberculosis. In protected natural (...)
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  10. Michael C. Morris (2006). The Ethics and Politics of the Caged Layer Hen Debate in New Zealand. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (5):495-514.score: 240.0
    Changes in attitudes toward animal welfare, with a greater emphasis on the importance of allowing animals to express normal patterns of behavior has led to an examination of the practice of keeping hens in battery cages. There is widespread scientific consensus that the conditions of confinement and the barren nature of battery cages severely restrict hens’ behavioral repertoire, and are thus detrimental to their welfare. The New Zealand Animal Welfare Act 1999, stipulates that animals must have “the opportunity to (...)
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  11. M. C. Morris & S. A. Weaver (2003). Minimizing Harm in Agricultural Animal Experiments in New Zealand. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (5):421-437.score: 240.0
    Intrusive agricultural experimentspublished in New Zealand in the last five yearsare reviewed in terms of the degree of animalsuffering involved, and the necessity for thissuffering in relation to research findings.When measured against animal welfare criteriaof the Ministry of Agriculture, thirty-sixstudies inflicted ``severe'' or ``very severe''suffering. Many of these experiments hadquestionable short-term applications, had anapplication restricted to agriculturalproduction or economic growth, or could havebeen modified to prevent or reduce suffering.
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  12. John R. Fairweather & Lesley M. Hunt (2011). Can Farmers Map Their Farm System? Causal Mapping and the Sustainability of Sheep/Beef Farms in New Zealand. Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):55-66.score: 240.0
    It is generally accepted that farmers manage a complex farm system. In this article we seek answers to the following questions. How do farmers perceive and understand their farm system? Are they sufficiently aware of their farm system that they are able to represent it in the form of a map? The research reported describes how causal mapping was applied to sheep/beef farmers in New Zealand and shows that farmers can create maps of their farm systems in ways that (...)
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  13. John R. Fairweather & Hugh R. Campbell (2003). Environmental Beliefs and Farm Practices of New Zealand Farmers Contrasting Pathways to Sustainability. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (3):287-300.score: 240.0
    Sustainable farming, and waysto achieve it, are important issues foragricultural policy. New Zealand provides aninteresting case for examining sustainableagriculture options because gene technologieshave not been commercially released and thereis a small but rapidly expanding organicsector. There is no strong governmentsubsidization of agriculture, so while policiesseem to favor both options to some degree,neither has been directly supported. Resultsfrom a survey of 656 farmers are used to revealthe intentions, environmental values, andfarming practices for organic, conventional,and GE intending farmers. The results show (...)
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  14. John R. Fairweather (1999). Understanding How Farmers Choose Between Organic and Conventional Production: Results From New Zealand and Policy Implications. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (1):51-63.score: 240.0
    Research on organic farmers is popular but has seldom specifically focused on their motivations and decision making. Results based on detailed interviews with 83 New Zealand farmers (both organic and conventional) are presented by way of a decision tree that highlights elimination factors, motivations, and constraints against action. The results show the reasons that lie behind farmers' choices of farming methods and highlight the diversity of motivations for organic farming, identifying different types of organic and conventional farmers. Policies to (...)
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  15. Dunedin New Zealand (2004). 2004 Annual Conference of the Australasian Association for Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 10 (3):447.score: 240.0
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  16. New Zealand (2009). Committee Advice on Embryo Splitting. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).score: 240.0
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  17. Graham Oddie & Roy W. Perrett (eds.) (1992). Justice, Ethics, and New Zealand Society. Oxford University Press.score: 224.0
    What is sovereignty? Was it ceded to the Crown in the Treaty of Waitangi? If land was unjustly confiscated over a century ago, should it be returned? Is an ecosystem valuable in itself, or only because of its value to people? Does a property right entail a right to destroy? Can collectives (such as tribes) bear moral responsibility? Do they have moral rights? If so, what are the implications for the justice system? These questions are essentially philosophical, yet all thoughtful (...)
     
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  18. Michael C. Morris & Sean A. Weaver (2003). Minimizing Harm in Possum Control Operations and Experiments in New Zealand. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (4):367-385.score: 210.0
    Pest control operations andexperimentation on sentient animals such as thebrushtail possum can cause unnecessary andavoidable suffering in the animal subjects.Minimizing animal suffering is an animalwelfare goal and can be used as a guide in thedesign and execution of animal experimentationand pest control operations.The public has little sympathy for the possum,which can cause widespread environmentaldamage, but does believe that control should beas painless as possible. Trapping and poisoningprovide only short-term solutions to the possumproblem and often involve methods that causesuffering. Intrusive experiments (...)
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  19. Michael C. Morris (2011). The Use of Animals in New Zealand: Regulation and Practice. Society and Animals 19 (4):368-382.score: 210.0
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  20. E. Collins, C. Dickie & P. Weber (2009). A New Zealand and Australian Overview of Ethics and Sustainability in SMEs. African Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):48.score: 210.0
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  21. Annie Potts & Mandala White (2008). New Zealand Vegetarians: At Odds with Their Nation. Society and Animals 16 (4):336-353.score: 210.0
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  22. S. A. Weaver & M. C. Morris (2004). Science, Pigs, and Politics: A New Zealand Perspective on the Phase-Out of Sow Stalls. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (1):51-66.score: 210.0
    Sows housed in stalls are kept insuch extreme confinement that they are unableto turn around. In some sectors of the porkindustry, sows are subjected to this degree ofconfinement for almost their entire lives(apart from the brief periods associated withmating). While individual confinement isrecognized by farmers and animal welfarecommunity organizations alike, as a valuabletool in sow husbandry (to mitigate againstaggression), what remains questionable from ananimal welfare point of view is the necessityto confine sows in such small spaces.In 2001, the Australian Journal (...)
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  23. Doreen D'Cruz (2011). The Lonely and the Alone: The Poetics of Isolation in New Zealand Fiction. Rodopi.score: 210.0
    Isolation in the back-country: George Chamier, G.B. Lancaster, Katherine Mansfield, John Mulgan, and Graham Billing -- Outsiders and misfits in fragmented social milieux: William Satchell, Vincent Pyke, John A. Lee, Robin Hyde, Frank Sargeson, and others -- The lonely and the alone in the fiction of Janet Frame -- Maurice Gee and postmodern isolation -- Women, isolation, and history: Fiona Kidman, Noel Hilliard, and Patricia Grace -- Cultural deracination and isolation: Witi Ihimaera, Keri Hulme, and Alan Duff.
     
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  24. Liz Lightfoot (2011). Outspoken: Coming Out in the Anglican Church of Aotearoa, New Zealand. Otago University Press.score: 210.0
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  25. Alison Loveridge (2013). Changes in Animal Welfare Views in New Zealand: Responding to Global Change. Society and Animals 21 (4):325-340.score: 210.0
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  26. Annie Potts (2009). Kiwis Against Possums: A Critical Analysis of Anti-Possum Rhetoric in Aotearoa New Zealand. Society and Animals 17 (1):1-20.score: 210.0
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  27. Krishna Reddy, Stuart Locke, Frank Scrimgeour & Abeyratna Gunasekarage (2008). Corporate Governance Practices of Small Cap Companies and Their Financial Performance: An Empirical Study in New Zealand. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (1):51-78.score: 180.0
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of corporate governance practices of small cap companies have had on their financial performances. Previous studies have mainly examined governance practices of larger corporations. This analysis focuses on the governance variables that have been highlighted by the New Zealand Securities Commission (2004) governance principles and guidelines and also on the governance variables that are supported in the literature as providing an appropriate structure for the firm in the environment in (...)
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  28. Kazi Fioz Alam (1999). Business Ethics in New Zealand Organisations: Views From the Middle and Lower Level Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (2):145 - 153.score: 180.0
    This study is carried out to assess the state of business ethics in New Zealand organisations from the point view of middle and lower level managers. The survey results clearly indicate that companies in New Zealand give low priorities to ethics with other values in the corporate culture. A significant number of respondents also believe that pressures from the top to achieve results and the organisational climate and ruthless competition help create an unethical environment. A greater emphasis on (...)
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  29. Gabriel Eweje & Minyu Wu (2010). Corporate Response to an Ethical Incident: The Case of an Energy Company in New Zealand. Business Ethics 19 (4):379-392.score: 180.0
    The ethical behaviour and social responsibility of private companies, and in particular large corporations, is an important area of enquiry in contemporary social, economic and political thinking. In the past, a company's behaviour would be considered responsible as long as it stayed within the law of the society in which it operated or existed. Although this may be necessary, it is no longer sufficient. In this paper, we examine an energy company's response to an ethical incident in New Zealand (...)
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  30. Jenny Goodwin & David Goodwin (1999). Ethical Judgments Across Cultures: A Comparison Between Business Students From Malaysia and New Zealand. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 18 (3):267 - 281.score: 180.0
    This study compares the attitudes to ethical dilemmas of first year business students in Malaysia and New Zealand by using a series of scenarios or vignettes. Between subject manipulations were made to the scenarios given, based on expected cultural differences suggested in the literature. In particular, Hofstede's (1980, 1983 and 1991) work was used as a framework to identify dimensions based on differences in national culture. The results indicated some differences in responses based on both nationality and ethnic origin. (...)
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  31. Alan C. B. Tse & Alan K. M. Au (1997). Are New Zealand Business Students More Unethical Than Non-Business Students? Journal of Business Ethics 16 (4):445-450.score: 180.0
    Using undergraduate students from the Waikato University in New Zealand as a sample, this study compared the ethical positions of students of different field of study and demographic characteristics. It was found that the ethical standard of business students are not significantly different from that of non-business students. The findings also suggest that female students are more ethical than male students, and senior students are more ethical than junior students.Besides sex and year of study, other variables studied were parents' (...)
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  32. Alastair S. Gunn & Carolyn McCallig (1997). Environmental Values and Environmental Law in New Zealand. Ethics and the Environment 2 (2):103 - 120.score: 180.0
    We examine the relation between environmental ethics and environmental law, focusing on the New Zealand Resource Management Act of 1991. This is a comprehensive and philosophically grounded statute that was the first of its kind in the world. We analyze key concepts in the law, including sustainability, resources, stewardship, natural character, and intrinsic law, which we try to resolve from a "weak anthropocentric" position.
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  33. Donna Buckingham (2012). Disciplining Lawyers in New Zealand: Re-Pinning the Badge of 'Professionalism'. Legal Ethics 15 (1):57-82.score: 180.0
    On 1 August 2008 the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 came into force. It provides the terms of the current regulatory bargain struck between the state and the New Zealand legal profession. Barely 16 months later the profession was served notice that the basis of that bargain might radically change. To an academic lawyer with a practising certificate, this is both a tantalising research opportunity as well as a professionally unsettling prospect. Part 1 of this paper explores the current (...)
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  34. Donna Buckingham (2012). Putting the Legal House in Order: Responses to New Zealand Lawyers Who Break Trust. Legal Ethics 15 (2):315-334.score: 180.0
    Governance and discipline of the legal profession is a highly topical issue in the New Zealand and has been the subject of recent reform, with a move to a more co-regulatory structure. An explanation of that context follows, together with an overview of how the Disciplinary Tribunal under the Law Practitioners Act 1982 and its successor under the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 approach strike-off or suspension as the penalty in what would currently be termed 'misconduct' cases. Case studies (...)
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  35. E. Fenton (2010). Making Fair Funding Decisions for High Cost Cancer Care: The Case of Herceptin in New Zealand. Public Health Ethics 3 (2):137-146.score: 180.0
    In 2008 New Zealand's pharmaceutical management agency, PHARMAC, made its final decision on the funding of trastuzumab (Herceptin) for HER2-positive early stage breast cancer. PHARMAC declined to fund the 12-month Herceptin regimen requested by the drug's manufacturer, funding instead a 9-week treatment regimen. The decision was justified on the grounds that there was insufficient evidence of additional long-term health benefits from the longer treatment course, which, coupled with the high cost of the drug, did not make the 12-month regimen (...)
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  36. Dennis Keeney (2012). Michael Morris: Factory Farming and Animal Liberation in New Zealand. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):633-634.score: 180.0
    Michael Morris: Factory Farming and Animal Liberation in New Zealand Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9327-1 Authors Dennis Keeney, Emeritus Professor, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  37. Rex Ahdar (2003). Indigenous Spiritual Concerns and the Secular State: Some New Zealand Developments. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 23 (4):611-637.score: 180.0
    This article explores the recurrent global claim by indigenous peoples for their spiritual concerns to be taken seriously and given appropriate effect in public policy. The secular liberal state's commitment to ideals of religious neutrality and equal treatment of all faiths and none is clearly tested to the degree it privileges traditional indigenous religion in the name of fostering indigenous culture. This dilemma has been acutely raised in New Zealand where Maori metaphysical concerns—the appeasement of taniwha (spiritual monsters) and (...)
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  38. Margaret Brunton & Gabriel Eweje (2010). The Influence of Culture on Ethical Perception Held by Business Students in a New Zealand University. Business Ethics 19 (4):349-362.score: 180.0
    The demand for principled and transparent corporate moral judgement and ethical decision making in the workplace makes it necessary for business students as future managers to understand the expectations of ethical workplace conduct. Corporate scandals mean that there is enhanced interest in ensuring that ethical content is included in curricula in universities. In this study, we re-visit the question of whether culture has an influence on ethical perceptions of workplace scenarios, using students enrolled in a College of Business in a (...)
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  39. Jennifer Moore (2013). Proposed Changes to New Zealand's Medicines Legislation in the Medicines Amendment Bill 2011. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):59-66.score: 180.0
    This article evaluates New Zealand’s Medicines Amendment Bill 2011. This Bill is currently before Parliament and will amend the Medicines Act 1981. On June 20, 2011, the Australian and New Zealand governments announced their decision to proceed with a joint scheme for the regulation of therapeutic products such as medicines, medical devices, and new medical interventions. Eventually, the joint arrangements will be administered by a single regulatory agency: the Australia New Zealand Therapeutic Products Agency. The medicines regulations (...)
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  40. Marilyn Okleshen & Richard Hoyt (1996). A Cross Cultural Comparison of Ethical Perspectives and Decision Approaches of Business Students: United States of America Versus New Zealand. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (5):537 - 549.score: 180.0
    While differences do exist, there are many ethical issues which transcend national barriers. In order to contribute to the development of understanding of global ethics, this study documents the existing ethical perspectives of collegiate business students from two countries and identifies the determinants of their ethical orientations.A survey instrument was administered to USA and New Zealand (NZ) students enrolled in undergraduate business programs. The research instrument measured students' ethical perspectives across multilayered ethical domains and their self-professed decision method used (...)
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  41. Kazi Firoz Alam (1993). Ethics in New Zealand Organisations. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):433 - 440.score: 180.0
    The main objective of this study is to assess the state of business ethics in New Zealand organisations. The survey results suggest that top New Zealand companies give low priorities to ethical values. A number of suggestions have been put forward by the respondents to improve the corporate ethical environment. These include commitment of top management, written and published codes of ethics, comprehensive accounting standards and annual reporting and monitoring and an efficient legal and education system.
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  42. V. E. Fleming (1998). Autonomous or Automatons?An Exploration Through History of the Concept of Autonomy in Midwifery in Scotland and New Zealand. Nursing Ethics 5 (1):43-51.score: 180.0
    Through the World Health Organization’s definition of midwifery, midwives are frequently heard to describe themselves as autonomous practitioners. In this article this notion is refuted. An overview of individual and collective autonomy is first presented to contextualize the subsequent discussion. Then the notion of autonomy in relation to midwifery practice in Scotland and New Zealand is critiqued through tracing the history of midwives and midwifery in these two countries. Issues relating to midwifery registration, medicalization of birth and consumerism are (...)
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  43. Colin McGeorge (1975). Some Old Wine and Some New Bottles: Religious and Moral Education in New Zealand. Journal of Moral Education 4 (3):215-223.score: 180.0
    Abstract: This article briefly describes and accounts for the present resurgence of interest in moral education in New Zealand. The tendency has been for moral education to be equated with sex education or religious instruction and the present debate stems in part from the former and spills over into the latter of these and is further complicated by a suggested merger between Church and State schools. The development of present legislation regarding religious instruction is traced and the current situation (...)
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  44. Robert Keith Shaw (2007). Pedagogic Thinking That Grounds E-Learning for Secondary School Science Students in New Zealand. E-Learning and Digital Media 4 (4):471-481.score: 180.0
    Course designers adopted a language-learners approach to the online teaching of New Zealand secondary school students in the subject of astronomy. This was possible because the curriculum for astronomy that was in 2004 established as a part of New Zealand's national curriculum was specifically designed to engage underachieving students in science and technology. A criterion-referenced assessment regime was established and an Internet platform was built specifically to facilitate this form of assessment. This platform contrasts with the norm-referenced assessment (...)
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  45. Yukiko Asada, Miho Tsuzuki, Shiro Akiyama, Nobuko Y. Macer & Darryl R. J. Macer (1996). High School Teaching of Bioethics in New Zealand, Australia and Japan. Journal of Moral Education 25 (4):401-420.score: 180.0
    Abstract An International Bioethics Education Survey was conducted in Australia (A), Japan (J) and New Zealand (NZ) in mid?1993. National random samples of high schools were selected, and mail response questionnaires were sent to a biology (b) and a social studies (s) teacher at each school through the principals. The number of respondents and response rate were: NZb 206 (55%), NZs 96 (26%), Ab 251 (48%), As 114 (22%), Jb 560 (40%) and Js 383 (27%). This paper compares knowledge (...)
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  46. Tracey E. Chan, Nicola S. Peart & Jacqueline Chin (forthcoming). Evolving Legal Responses to Dependence on Families in New Zealand and Singapore Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics:2012-101225.score: 180.0
    Healthcare decision-making has traditionally focused on individual autonomy, but there is now a change occurring in which the involvement of families is gaining prominence. This appears to stem from an increasing emphasis on relational aspects of autonomy which recognises the individual's connectedness to their family, and also state reliance upon families to share the burdens and costs of caring for elderly and disabled dependents. Such a reorientation calls for similar legal emphasis on patient autonomy as understood in relational terms, and (...)
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  47. Sondra Harcourt & Mark Harcourt (2002). Do Employers Comply with Civil/Human Rights Legislation? New Evidence From New Zealand Job Application Forms. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):207 - 221.score: 180.0
    This study assesses the extent to which job application forms violate the New Zealand Human Rights Act. The sample for the study includes 229 job application forms, collected from a variety of large and small, public- and private-sector organizations that together employ approximately 200,000 workers. Two hundred and four or 88% of the job application forms contain at least one violation of the Act. One hundred and sixty five or 72% contain two or more and 140 or 61% contain (...)
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  48. Andrew Moore (2011). New Zealand Research Ethics Committee Matters. Research Ethics 7 (4):132-135.score: 180.0
    New Zealand's health (and disability) ethics committees are children of public inquiries: the ‘Cartwright’ ministerial inquiry of 1988, the ‘Gisborne’ cervical screening ministerial inquiry of 2001, and the Health Select Committee clinical trials inquiry of 2011. The Cartwright inquiry strengthened external scrutiny of research. The Gisborne Inquiry strengthened ethics committee accountability and expertise, and greatly streamlined review process. The Health Select Committee inquiry is further sharpening accountability and process. Under-discussed systemic issues also persist, including: how to keep the ethical (...)
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  49. Max Wallace (2014). The Terminal Decline of Christianity in New Zealand. Australian Humanist, The 114:16.score: 180.0
    Wallace, Max The results of the 2013 New Zealand Census has Christianity down to around 47 per cent. Retired scientist Ken Perrott's accompanying graph charts Christianity's decline in every recent census and projects its decline to just above 20 per cent by 2030, and further beyond that date.1 It is, of course, very unlikely to disappear altogether, but, equally, the chances of a major Christian revival in New Zealand are very remote.
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