Search results for 'Newtonians' (try it on Scholar)

21 found
Order:
  1.  24
    C. D. Broad (1981). Leibniz's Last Controversy with the Newtonians. In R. S. Woolhouse (ed.), Theoria. Oxford University Press 143-168.
  2.  9
    Edward Kaplan (1984). The Newtonians and the English Revolution 1689-1720. International Studies in Philosophy 16 (3):87-87.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  6
    H. R. Bernstein (1977). The Newtonians and the English Revolution. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (3):343-345.
  4.  2
    Peter Heimann (1978). Essay Review: The Newtonians and the English Revolution, 1689-1720 by Margaret C. Jacob; Reason, Ridicule and Religion. The Age of Enlightenment in England, 1660-1750 by John Redwood. [REVIEW] History of Science 16:143-151.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Andy Clark (1990). Connectionism, Competence and Explanation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (June):195-222.
    A competence model describes the abstract structure of a solution to some problem. or class of problems, facing the would-be intelligent system. Competence models can be quite derailed, specifying far more than merely the function to be computed. But for all that, they are pitched at some level of abstraction from the details of any particular algorithm or processing strategy which may be said to realize the competence. Indeed, it is the point and virtue of such models to specify some (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  6.  82
    Charles T. Wolfe (2014). On the Role of Newtonian Analogies in Eighteenth-Century Life Science:Vitalism and Provisionally Inexplicable Explicative Devices. In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford UP 223-261.
    Newton’s impact on Enlightenment natural philosophy has been studied at great length, in its experimental, methodological and ideological ramifications. One aspect that has received fairly little attention is the role Newtonian “analogies” played in the formulation of new conceptual schemes in physiology, medicine, and life science as a whole. So-called ‘medical Newtonians’ like Pitcairne and Keill have been studied; but they were engaged in a more literal project of directly transposing, or seeking to transpose, Newtonian laws into quantitative models (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7. Alan Musgrave (1992). Realism About What? Philosophy of Science 59 (4):691-697.
    Roger Jones asks what Newtonian realists should be realists about, given that there are four empirically equivalent formulations of Newtonian mechanics which have different ontological commitments and explanatory mechanisms. A realist answer is sketched: Newtonians should be realists about what the best metaphysical considerations dictate, where the best metaphysical considerations are those which have yielded the best physics. Metaphysical considerations are required within physics, just as they are required to eliminate idealist and surrealist theories which are empirically equivalent to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8.  4
    Chris Lindsay (2012). Hume and Reid on Newtonianism, Naturalism and Liberty. In Ilya Kasavin (ed.), David Hume and Contemporary Philosophy. Cambridge Scholars Press
    There has been a recent flurry of work comparing and contrasting the respective methodologies of David Hume and his contemporary Thomas Reid. Both writers are explicit in their commitments to a Newtonian methodology. Yet they diverge radically on the issue of human liberty. In this paper I want to unpack the methodological commitments underlying the two different accounts of liberty. How is it that two avowed Newtonians end up diametrically opposed to one another with respect to such a fundamental (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  16
    Thomas Ahnert (2004). Newtonianism in Early Enlightenment Germany, C. 1720 to 1750: Metaphysics and the Critique of Dogmatic Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):471-491.
    The acceptance of Newton’s ideas and Newtonianism in the early German Enlightenment is usually described as hesitant and slow. Two reasons help to explain this phenomenon. One is that those who might have adopted Newtonian arguments were critics of Wolffianism. These critics, however, drew on indigenous currents of thought, pre-dating the reception of Newton in Germany and independent of Newtonian science. The other reason is that the controversies between Wolffians and their critics focused on metaphysics. Newton’s reputation, however, was that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10.  14
    Peter Harrison (1995). Newtonian Science, Miracles, and the Laws of Nature. Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (4):531 - 553.
    Newton, along with a number of other seventeenth-century scientists, is frequently charged with having held an inconsistent view of nature and its operations, believing on the one hand in immutable laws of nature, and on the other in divine interventions into the natural order. In this paper I argue that Newton, William Whiston, and Samuel Clarke, came to understand miracles, not as violations of laws of nature, but rather as beneficent coincidences which were remarkable either because they were unusual, or (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11.  3
    Patrick J. Connolly (2016). Maclaurin on Occasionalism: A Reply to Ablondi. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):125-135.
    In a recent article Fred Ablondi compares the different approaches to occasionalism put forward by two eighteenth-century Newtonians, Colin Maclaurin and Andrew Baxter. The goal of this short essay is to respond to Ablondi by clarifying some key features of Maclaurin's views on occasionalism and the cause of gravitational attraction. In particular, I explore Maclaurin's matter theory, his views on the explanatory limits of mechanism, and his appeals to the authority of Newton. This leads to a clearer picture of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino, Ontological Tensions in 16th and 17th Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism.
    The 16th and 17th centuries marked a period of transition from the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy to the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper focuses on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of 16th and 17th century chemistry and chemical philosophy. The paper argues that, within the fields of chemistry and chemical philosophy, the significant transition that culminated in the 18th (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  52
    Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2011). Ontological Tensions in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism. Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):173-186.
    The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries marks a period of transition between the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy and the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper will focus on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of sixteenth and seventeenth century chemistry and chemical philosophy, particularly in the works of Paracelsus, Jan Baptista Van Helmont, Robert Fludd, and Robert Boyle. Rather than argue (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  26
    Sarah Hutton (2004). Emilie du Châtelet's Institutions de Physique as a Document in the History of French Newtonianism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):515-531.
    This paper discusses the contribution of Madame Du Châtelet to the reception of Newtonianism in France prior to her translation of Newton’s Principia. It focuses on her Institutions de physique, a work normally considered for its contribution to the reception of Leibniz in France. By comparing the different editions of the Institutions, I argue that her interest in Newton antedated her interest in Leibniz, and that she did not see Leibniz’s metaphysics as incompatible with Newtonian science. Her Newtonianism can be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  21
    Mark A. Kulstad (2008). Newton, Spinoza, Stoics and Others. The Leibniz Review 18:81-121.
    Starting from Leibniz’s complaint that Newton’s views seem to make God the soul of the world, this paper examines Leibniz’s critical stance more generally towards God as the soul of the world and related theses. A preliminary task is determining what the related theses are. There are more of these than might have been thought. Once the relations are established, it becomes clear how pervasive the various guises of the issue of God as the soul of the world are in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  30
    Nicholas Huggett, Ch 3: Leibniz.
    Leibniz’s mechanics was, as we shall see, a theory of elastic collisions, not formulated like Huygens’ in terms of rules explicitly covering every possible combination of relative masses and velocities, but in terms of three conservation principles, including (effectively) the conservation of momentum and kinetic energy. That is, he proposed what we now call (ironically enough) ‘Newtonian’ (or ‘classical’) elastic collision theory. While such a theory is, for instance, vital to the foundations of the kinetic theory of gases, it is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  13
    James Hill (2012). How Hume Became 'The New Hume': A Developmental Approach. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (2):163-181.
    It is argued that we should distinguish between an ‘early Hume’ and a ‘mature Hume’ on causality. In his early period, represented by the Treatise, Hume had not yet adopted Newtonian active principles. In the mature period, however, represented in particular by the First Enquiry, his theory of causation has been transformed by a reception of Newton. This leads Hume to drop the condition of contiguity, which had excluded action-at-a-distance in the Treatise. It also leads him to allow real necessary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  16
    Myles W. Jackson (2008). Putting the Subject Back Into Color: Accessibility in Goethe's Zur Farbenlehre. Perspectives on Science 16 (4):pp. 378-391.
    This article discusses Goethe’s theory of color and his diatribes against the Newtonians by situating his work within two contexts, one political and the other intellectual. The political context is Goethe’s dismay over the rise of obscurantism, typified by the Illuminati movement of the late eighteenth century, with secrecy and elitism as its hallmarks. The intellectual context is the tradition of German Idealism. He was fundamentally committed to understanding the relationship between the subject, or the investigator of nature, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  4
    Niccol`O. Guicciardini (2006). Johann Bernoulli, John Keill and the Inverse Problem of Central Forces. Annals of Science 52 (6):537-575.
    Johann Bernoulli in 1710 affirmed that Newton had not proved that conic sections, having a focus in the force centre, were necessary orbits for a body accelerated by an inverse square force. He also criticized Newton's mathematical procedures applied to central forces in Principia mathematica, since, in his opinion, they lacked generality and could be used only if one knew the solution in advance. The development of eighteenth-century dynamics was mainly due to Continental mathematicians who followed Bernoulli's approach rather than (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  6
    Brian Young (2004). Newtonianism and the Enthusiasm of Enlightenment. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):645-663.
    The career of John Jackson , Arian theologian and controversialist, provides a key to unlocking the early reception and quick collapse of a Newtonian natural apologetic originally developed by Samuel Clarke. The importance of friendship and discipleship in eighteenth-century intellectual enquiry is emphasised, and the links between Newton and his followers are traced alongside those of a group of Cambridge Lockeans, led by Jackson’s direct contemporary Daniel Waterland, who proved instrumental in the initial dismantling of Clarke’s brand of Newtonian apologetic. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Ivica Martinović (2010). Riječanin Josip Zanchi o Rabljaninu Marku Antunu de Dominisu. Filozofska Istrazivanja 29 (4):689-707.
    Tijekom svoje kratke filozofske profesure na Bečkom sveučilištu i u plemićkom zavodu Collegium Theresianum , ali i potom dok je bio profesorom teologije u Beču, isusovac Josip Zanchi, riječki plemić, četiri je puta tiskao svoj udžbenik Physica particularis, koji je sadržavao raspravu iz meteorologije. U svim je tim izdanjima izlaganje o uzroku dúge započeo povijesnom bilješkom, u kojoj je sažeto prikazao de Dominisov, Descartesov i Newtonov doprinos objašnjenju dúge. Potraga za Zanchijevim izvorom u optičkim i prirodnofilozofskim djelima objavljenim nakon Newtonova (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography