12 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Nicholas Bardsley [11]Nicholas Oliver Bardsley [1]
  1. Royce Carroll, Toh-Kyeong Ahn, John H. Aldrich, John Allman, James E. Alt, Julia Annas, Kenneth J. Arrow, Nicholas Bardsley, Jon Barwise & John Beatty (forthcoming). Capra, Frank 136 Carpenter, Malinda 308. Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Nicholas Bardsley, Chris Starmer, Robin Cubitt, Graham Loomes, Peter Moffatt & Robert Sugden (2011). A Response to Binmore, Harrison and Ross onExperimental Economics: Rethinking the Rules. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (2):195-199.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Nicholas Bardsley (2010). Sociality and External Validity in Experimental Economics. Mind and Society 9 (2):119-138.
    It is sometimes argued that experimental economists do not have to worry about external validity so long as the design sticks closely to a theoretical model. This position mistakes the model for the theory. As a result, applied economics designs often study phenomena distinct from their stated objects of inquiry. Because the implemented models are abstract, they may provide improbable analogues to their stated subject matter. This problem is exacerbated by the relational character of the social world, which also sets (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. C. Heintz & Nicholas Bardsley (2010). The Implication of Social Cognition for Experimental Economics. Mind and Society 9 (2):113-118.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Christophe Heintz & Nicholas Bardsley (2010). Special Issue on “Experimental Economics and the Social Embedding of Economic Behaviour and Cognition”. Mind and Society 9 (2):113-118.
    Can human social cognitive processes and social motives be grasped by the methods of experimental economics? Experimental studies of strategic cognition and social preferences contribute to our understanding of the social aspects of economic decisions making. Yet, papers in this issue argue that the social aspects of decision-making introduce several difficulties for interpreting the results of economic experiments. In particular, the laboratory is itself a social context, and in many respects a rather distinctive one, which raises questions of external validity.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Christophe Heinz & Nicholas Oliver Bardsley (2010). The Implication of Social Cognition for Experimental Economics From the Issue Entitled" Special Issue on Experimental Economics and the Social Embedding of Economic Behavior and Cognition". Mind and Society 9 (2):113-118.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Nicholas Bardsley, Robin Cubitt, Graham Loomes, Peter Moffatt, Chris Starmer & Robert Sugden (2009). Experimental Economics: Rethinking the Rules. Princeton University Press.
    The authors explore the history of experiments in economics, provide examples of different types of experiments and show that the growing use of experimental methods is transforming economics into an empirical science.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Nicholas Bardsley (2007). On Collective Intentions: Collective Action in Economics and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Synthese 157 (2):141 - 159.
    Philosophers and economists write about collective action from distinct but related points of view. This paper aims to bridge these perspectives. Economists have been concerned with rationality in a strategic context. There, problems posed by “coordination games” seem to point to a form of rational action, “team thinking,” which is not individualistic. Philosophers’ analyses of collective intention, however, sometimes reduce collective action to a set of individually instrumental actions. They do not, therefore, capture the first person plural perspective characteristic of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Nicholas Bardsley (2007). Teamwork: Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives, Edited by Natalie Gold. Palgrave Macmillan, 2005, XXVI+253 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):237-240.
  10. Nicholas Bardsley & Peter G. Moffatt (2007). The Experimetrics of Public Goods: Inferring Motivations From Contributions. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 62 (2):161-193.
    In public goods experiments, stochastic choice, censoring and motivational heterogeneity give scope for disagreement over the extent of unselfishness, and whether it is reciprocal or altruistic. We show that these problems can be addressed econometrically, by estimating a finite mixture model to isolate types, incorporating double censoring and a tremble term. Most subjects act selfishly, but a substantial proportion are reciprocal with altruism playing only a marginal role. Isolating reciprocators enables a test of Sugden’s model of voluntary contributions. We estimate (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Nicholas Bardsley (2005). Experimental Economics and the Artificiality of Alteration. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):239-251.
    A neglected critique of social science laboratories alleges that they implement phenomena different to those supposedly under investigation. The critique purports to be conceptual and so invulnerable to a technical solution. I argue that it undermines some economics designs seeking to implement features of real societies, and counsels more modesty in experimental write?ups. It also constitutes a plausible argument that laboratory economics experiments are necessarily less demonstrative than natural scientific ones. More radical sceptical conclusions are unwarranted.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Nicholas Bardsley (2001). Collective Reasoning: A Critique of Martin Hollis's Position. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (4):171-192.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation