Search results for 'Nicholas Barry' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Nicholas Barry (Rice University)
  1. Barry Nicholas (1956). Apokrimata: Decisions of Septimius Severus on Legal Matters. Edited by William Linn Westermann and A. Arthur Schiller. Pp. X + 110; 1 Plate. New York: Columbia University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1954. Cloth, 60s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 6 (02):179-180.score: 300.0
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  2. Barry Nicholas (1963). Alan Watson: Contract of Mandate in Roman Law. Pp. 223. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1961. Cloth, 42s. Net. The Classical Review 13 (03):355-356.score: 300.0
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  3. Barry Nicholas (1952). Classical Roman Law Fritz Schulz: Classical Roman Law. Pp. Xii + 650. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1951. Cloth, 42s. Net. The Classical Review 2 (3-4):204-206.score: 300.0
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  4. Barry Nicholas (1952). The Institutes of Gaius Gaius: Institutes. Texte Établi Et Traduit Par Julien Reinach. Pp. Xix+379. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1950. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 2 (02):91-92.score: 300.0
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  5. Barry Nicholas (1955). A Dictionary of Roman Law Adolf Berger: Encyclopedic Dictionary of Roman Law. (Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Vol. 43, Part 2.) Pp. 476. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 1953. Paper, $5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 5 (02):179-180.score: 300.0
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  6. Barry Nicholas (1959). Gaetano de Sanctis: Storia dei Romani. Vol. iv: La fondazione dell' Impero, Parte ii: Vita e pensiero nell' etd delle grande conquiste, tomo ii. Pp. viii+125. Florence: La Nuova Italia, 1957. Paper, L. 1,300. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 9 (03):299-300.score: 300.0
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  7. Barry Nicholas (1954). The Theodosian Code Clyde Pharr: The Theodosian Code and Novels and the Sirmondian Constitutions. A Translation with Commentary, Glossary, and Bibliography. (The Corpus of Roman Law, Vol. I.) Pp. Xxvi+643; Map. Princeton: University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1952. Cloth, 130s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (3-4):267-268.score: 300.0
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  8. Barry Nicholas (1955). A Dictionary of Roman Law. The Classical Review 5 (02):179-.score: 300.0
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  9. Barry Nicholas (1957). Form Criticism in Roman Law David Daube: Forms of Roman Legislation. Pp. 111. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1956. Cloth, 21s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (3-4):250-252.score: 300.0
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  10. Barry Nicholas (1965). Hermogenian Detlef Liebs: Hermogenians Iuris Epitomae. (Abh. d. Akad. der Wiss. in Göttingen, Phil.-hist. Kl., iii. 57.) Pp. 137. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, 1964. Paper, DM. 20. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 15 (03):346-347.score: 300.0
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  11. Barry Nicholas (1958). Roman Foundations of Modern Law H. F. Jolowicz: Roman Foundations of Modern Law. Pp. Xx+217. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1957. Cloth, 35s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 8 (02):168-169.score: 300.0
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  12. Barry Nicholas (1982). Correspondence. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 2 (1):154-154.score: 300.0
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  13. Barry Nicholas (1958). C. W. Westrup: Some Notes on the Roman Slave in Early Times. A Comparative Sociological Study. (K. Danske Videnskabernes Selskab, Hist.-Fil. Meddelelser, Bind 36, No. 3.) Pp. 25. Copenhagen: Munksgaard, 1956. Paper, Kr. 4. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 8 (3-4):294-.score: 300.0
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  14. Barry Nicholas (1959). Fritz Sturm: Abalienatio. Pp. 230. Milan: Giuffrè, [1958]. Paper, L. 1,200. The Classical Review 9 (03):297-.score: 300.0
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  15. Barry Nicholas (1954). Roman Jurists Wolfgang Kunkel: Herkunft und soziale Stellung der römischen Juristen. Pp. xi+405. Weimar: Hermann Böhlaus Nachfolger, 1952. Paper, DM. 26.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (01):45-47.score: 300.0
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  16. Barry Nicholas (1952). Classical Roman Law. The Classical Review 2 (3-4):204-.score: 300.0
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  17. Barry Nicholas (1965). Hermogenian. The Classical Review 15 (03):346-.score: 300.0
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  18. Christian Barry & Nicholas Southwood (2011). What Is Special About Human Rights? Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3):369-83.score: 240.0
    Despite the prevalence of human rights discourse, the very idea or concept of a human right remains obscure. In particular, it is unclear what is supposed to be special or distinctive about human rights. In this paper, we consider two recent attempts to answer this challenge, James Griffin’s “personhood account” and Charles Beitz’s “practice-based account”, and argue that neither is entirely satisfactory. We then conclude with a suggestion for what a more adequate account might look like – what we call (...)
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  19. Nicholas Barry (2006). Defending Luck Egalitarianism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):89–107.score: 240.0
  20. Keith M. Dowding, Robert E. Goodin, Carole Pateman & Brian Barry (eds.) (2004). Justice and Democracy: Essays for Brian Barry. Cambridge University Press.score: 180.0
    While much has been written about social justice, even more has been written about democracy. Rarely is the relationship between social justice and democracy carefully considered. Does justice require democracy? Will democracy bring justice? This volume brings together leading authors who consider the relationship of democracy and justice. The intrinsic justness of democracy is challenged and the relationship between justice, democracy and the common good examined.
     
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  21. John Crook (1990). The Roman Law of Property Peter Birks (Ed.): New Perspectives in the Roman Law of Property: Essays for Barry Nicholas. Pp. Vii + 233; 1 Photograph. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989. £25. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (02):331-333.score: 120.0
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  22. Peter Birks (2004). John Kieran Barry Moylan Nicholas 1919-2002. Proceedings of the British Academy 124:218-239.score: 120.0
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  23. John Crook (1975). The New Jolowicz H. F. Jolowigz and Barry Nicholas: Historical Introduction to the Study of Raman Law. Third Edition. Pp. Xxvi+528. Cambridge: University Press, 1972. Cloth, £15. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 25 (01):66-69.score: 120.0
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  24. Richard Rankin Russell (2006). The Dramatic Conversion of Nicholas Barker in Barry Unsworth's Morality Play. Renascence 58 (3):221-239.score: 120.0
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  25. Nicholas B. King (2008). Review of Barry Kellman, Bioviolence: Preventing Biological Terror and Crime. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):53 – 55.score: 36.0
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  26. Kevin Carnahan (2013). Religion, and Not Just Religious Reasons, in the Public Square: A Consideration of Robert Audi's and Nicholas Wolterstorff's Religion in the Public Square. Philosophia 41 (2):397-409.score: 24.0
    For the last several decades, philosophers have wrestled with the proper place of religion in liberal societies. Usually, the debates among these philosophers have started with the articulation of various conceptions of liberalism and then proceeded to locate religion in the context of these conceptions. In the process, however, too little attention has been paid to the way religion is conceived. Drawing on the work of Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff, two scholars who are often read as holding opposing (...)
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  27. Agustin Vicente (2010). An Enlightened Revolt: On the Philosophy of Nicholas Maxwell. Philosophia 38 (4):38: 631- 648.score: 24.0
    This paper is a reaction to the book “Science and the Pursuit of Wisdom”, whose central concern is the philosophy of Nicholas Maxwell. I distinguish and discuss three concerns in Maxwell’s philosophy. The first is his critique of standard empiricism (SE) in the philosophy of science, the second his defense of aim-oriented rationality (AOR), and the third his philosophy of mind. I point at some problematic aspects of Maxwell’s rebuttal of SE and of his philosophy of mind and argue (...)
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  28. Christopher Rowe (2012). Socrates on Reason, Appetite and Passion: A Response to Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith, Socratic Moral Psychology. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 16 (3):305-324.score: 24.0
    Section 1 of this essay distinguishes between four interpretations of Socratic intellectualism, which are, very roughly: (1) a version in which on any given occasion desire, and then action, is determined by what we think will turn out best for us, that being what we all, always, really desire; (2) a version in which on any given occasion action is determined by what we think will best satisfy our permanent desire for what is really best for us; (3) a version (...)
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  29. Jason Bridges, Niko Kolodny & Wai-Hung Wong (eds.) (2012). The Possibility of Philosophical Understanding: Reflections on the Thought of Barry Stroud. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    Barry Stroud's work has had a profound impact on a very wide array of philosophical topics, including epistemological skepticism, the nature of logical necessity, the interpretation of Hume, the interpretation of Wittgenstein, the possibility of transcendental arguments, and the metaphysical status of color and value. And yet there has heretofore been no book-length treatment of his work. The current collection aims to redress this gap, with 13 essays on Stroud's work by a diverse group of contributors including some of (...)
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  30. Scott F. Aikin & Jason Aleksander (2013). Nicholas of Cusa's De Pace Fidei and the Meta-Exclusivism of Religious Pluralism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):219-235.score: 24.0
    In response to the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Nicholas of Cusa wrote De pace fidei defending a commitment to religious tolerance on the basis of the notion that all diverse rites are but manifestations of one true religion. Drawing on a discussion of why Nicholas of Cusa is unable to square the two objectives of arguing for pluralistic tolerance and explaining the contents of the one true faith, we outline why theological pluralism is compromised by its own (...)
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  31. Scott Barry Kaufman, Colin G. DeYoung, Jeremy R. Gray, Luis Jiménez, Jamie Brown & Nicholas Mackintosh (2010). Implicit Learning as an Ability. Cognition 116 (3):321-340.score: 24.0
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  32. Leni Franken & Patrick Loobuyck (2011). Barry and Kukathas as Inspiring Sources for a Fair Church-State System in Belgium. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (28):3-20.score: 24.0
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 In this article, we will look at the political philosophical theories of Brian Barry ( Culture and Equality , 2001) and Chandran Kukathas ( The Liberal Archipelago , 2003) and see which consequences both theories have for the Belgian model of church and state. For both authors, the liberal state should be neutral toward religion but they interpret this neutrality in a different way. According to Kukathas, neutrality implies a hands-off policy and therefore, (...)
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  33. Alex Voorhoeve (2009). Mill and Barry on the Foundations of Liberal Rights. The Philosophers' Magazine 46:78-82.score: 21.0
    In On Liberty, Mill famously propounded a view of the good life as the autonomous life. On this view, it is crucial that people develop and exercise, to a high degree, their ability to reason independently about what to believe and what to aim at in life. It is also important that they be able to freely hold and express their beliefs and effectively act on their aims. As Mill put it: The mental and the moral, like the muscular, powers (...)
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  34. Mehmet Karabela (2011). Philosophical Inquiries: An Introduction to Problems of Philosophy Nicholas Rescher Pittsburgh University Press, 2010 (Review). [REVIEW] Dialogue 50 (1):217-220.score: 21.0
  35. Jonathan Cohen (2003). Barry Stroud, the Quest for Reality: Subjectivism and the Metaphysics of Colour. Noûs 37 (3):537-554.score: 18.0
    In The Quest for Reality: Subjectivism and the Metaphysics of Colour [Stroud, 2000], Barry Stroud carries out an ambitious attack on various forms of irrealism and subjectivism about color. The views he targets - those that would deny a place in objective reality to the colors - have a venerable history in philosophy. Versions of them have been defended by Galileo, Descartes, Boyle, Locke, and Hume; more recently, forms of these positions have been articulated by Williams, Smart, Mackie, Ryle, (...)
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  36. Andrew Dole & Andrew Chignell (eds.) (2005). God and the Ethics of Belief: New Essays in Philosophy of Religion (Festschrift for Nicholas Wolterstorff). Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Philosophy of religion in the Anglo-American tradition experienced a 'rebirth' following the 1955 publication of New Essays in Philosophical Theology (eds. Antony Flew and Alisdair MacIntyre). Fifty years later, this volume of New Essays offers a sampling of the best work in what is now a very active field, written by some of its most prominent members. A substantial introduction sketches the developments of the last half-century, while also describing the 'ethics of belief' debate in epistemology and showing how it (...)
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  37. Paul Weithman (2009). Nicholas Wolterstorff's Justice: Rights and Wrongs: An Introduction. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):179-192.score: 18.0
    This introduction sets the stage for four papers on Nicholas Wolterstorff's Justice: Rights and Wrongs , written by Harold Attridge, Oliver O'Donovan, Richard Bernstein, and myself. In his book, Wolterstorff defends an account of human rights. The first section of this introduction distinguishes Wolterstorff's account of rights from the alternative account of rights against which he contends. The alternative account draws much of its power from a historical narrative according to which theory and politics supplanted earlier ways of thinking (...)
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  38. Scott Davison (2011). Nicholas Wolterstorff: Practices of Belief: Selected Essays, Volume 2 (Terence Cuneo, Ed.). [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (3):255-258.score: 18.0
    Nicholas Wolterstorff: Practices of belief: selected essays, volume 2 (Terence Cuneo, ed.) Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 255-258 DOI 10.1007/s11153-011-9287-4 Authors Scott A. Davison, Philosophy Program, Morehead State University, 150 University Blvd., 354A Rader Hall, Morehead, KY 40351, USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN 1572-8684 Print ISSN 0020-7047 Journal Volume Volume 70 Journal Issue Volume 70, Number 3.
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  39. Jasper Hopkins (2002). Nicholas of Cusa (1401–1464): First Modern Philosopher? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):13–29.score: 18.0
    Ever since Ernst Cassirer in his epochal book Individuum und Kosmos in der Philosophie der Renaissance1 labeled Nicholas of Cusa “the first modern thinker,” interest in Cusa’s thought has burgeoned. At various times, both before and after Cassirer, Nicholas has been viewed as a forerunner of Leibniz,2 a harbinger of Kant,3 a prefigurer of Hegel,4 indeed, as an anticipator of the whole of..
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  40. Alex Callinicos (2006). Confronting a World Without Justice: Brian Barry's Why Social Justice Matters. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (3):461-472.score: 18.0
    (2006). Confronting a World without Justice: Brian Barry’s Why Social Justice Matters. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 461-472.
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  41. Nicholas Maxwell, Nicholas Maxwell.score: 18.0
    We are in a state of impending crisis. And the fault lies in part with academia. For two centuries or so, academia has been devoted to the pursuit of knowledge and technological know-how. This has enormously increased our power to act which has, in turn, brought us both all the great benefits of the modern world and the crises we now face. Modern science and technology have made possible modern industry and agriculture, the explosive growth of the world’s population, global (...)
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  42. Michael Bacon (2003). Liberal Universalism: On Brian Barry and Richard Rorty. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (2):41-62.score: 18.0
    At first sight it would seem difficult to find two philosophers as different as Brian Barry and Richard Rorty. It is widely held that the former is one of the most forceful proponents of liberal universalism, whereas the latter is typically viewed as the quintessential relativist. In this essay, different usages of the term univeralism are considered, and it is argued that Rorty's position is much closer to that of Barry than is generally supposed. Indeed, the article concludes (...)
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  43. Natika Newton (2003). A Critical Review of Nicholas Maxwell's the Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will, and Evolution. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):149 – 156.score: 18.0
    Nicholas Maxwell takes on the ambitious project of explaining, both epistemologically and metaphysically, the physical universe and human existence within it. His vision is appealing; he unites the physical and the personal by means of the concepts of aim and value, which he sees as the keys to explaining traditional physical puzzles. Given the current popularity of theories of goal-oriented dynamical systems in biology and cognitive science, this approach is timely. But a large vision requires firm and nuanced arguments (...)
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  44. Keith Dowding (2003). Resources, Power and Systematic Luck: A Response to Barry. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 2 (3):305-322.score: 18.0
    Brian Barry attacks the `resource account' of power providing a set of definitions through which power should be analysed. While there might be different, equally good, ways of defining power, I argue that the formulations provided by Dowding are superior to those of Barry as they produce fewer anomalies and provide a better foundation for empirical research. The article defends the resource account against Barry's criticisms and argues for the utility of the ideas of luck and `systematic (...)
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  45. John L. Longeway (1987). Nicholas of Cusa and Man's Knowledge of God. Philosophy Research Archives 13:289-313.score: 18.0
    I argue that Nicholas of Cusa agrees with Thomas Aquinas on the metaphysics of analogy in God, but differs on epistemology, taking a Platonic position against Aquinas’ Aristotelianism. As a result Cusa has to rethink Thomas’ solution to the problem of discourse about God. In De docta ignorantia he uses the mathematics of the infinite as a clue to the relations between a thing and its Measure and this allows him, he thinks, to adapt Aquinas’ approach to the problem (...)
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  46. Charles W. Harvey (2007). Comments on Nicholas Georgalis's “First-Person Methodologies: A View From Outside the Phenomenological Tradition”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (S1):113-120.score: 18.0
    Three problems are raised for Nicholas Georgalis’s recent work: (1) a problem with regard to the supposed noninferential knowledge of minimal content, (2) a problem with the “necessary condition” Georgalis stipulates for the legitimate application of a first-person methodology to a science of the mind, and (3) a problem with regard to denying phenomenal content to intentional acts.
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  47. Joshua Preiss (2009). Why Brian Barry Should Be a Multiculturalist. Social Theory and Practice 35 (2):229-249.score: 18.0
    In this paper I argue that Barry, given the commitments that underlie his own theory of justice as impartiality, should be far more receptive to claims for cultural accommodation. Recognizing certain cultural rights claims will help balance against the ways that policies adopted by democratic majorities fail to treat members of minority cultural groups impartially. While I frame the paper in terms of an immanent criticism of this well-known opponent to multiculturalism, my analysis places demands on a whole section (...)
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  48. Robert Garner (2012). Much Ado About Nothing?: Barry, Justice and Animals. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):363-376.score: 18.0
    This article examines the extent to which Brian Barry?s contractarian political theory ? justice as impartiality ? is able to incorporate the interests of animals. Despite the initial optimism that Barry might provide a theory of justice that can provide substantial protection for the interests of animals, it is clear that he offers relatively little. Insofar as animals can be protected within justice as impartiality, they are not being protected as a result of their intrinsic value, but merely (...)
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  49. Maria Simone Marinho Nogueira (2012). Reflections on the Trinity as Expression of Love in Nicholas of Cusa. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):119-140.score: 18.0
    Procuramos, neste artigo, apresentar a reflexão de Nicolau de Cusa sobre a Trindade, em dois dos seus textos: De coniecturis e De visione dei. Nesses dois livros, a Trindade recebe uma série de outras designações diferentes daquelas que aparecem nas citações bíblicas ou, como ele próprio afirma, diferentes das usadas pelos nossos doutores. Nesse sentido, objetivamos mostrar, também, que as expressões da Trindade podem ser lidas como expressões do amor no pensamento do filósofo alemão. We seek in this paper to (...)
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  50. Eduardo Mendieta (2007). Review of Nicholas Adams, Habermas and Theology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (2).score: 18.0
    of Nicholas Adams, (from Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews).
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