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  1. Nicholas D. Smith (unknown). Dialogue and Discovery: A Study in Socratic Method. Philosophical Explorations:215-219.
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  2. Nicholas D. Smith (forthcoming). Diviners and Divination in Aristophanic Comedy. Classical Antiquity.
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  3. Nicholas D. Smith (2014). Socratic Metaphysics? Apeiron 47 (4):419-434.
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  4. John Bussanich & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) (2013). The Bloomsbury Companion to Socrates. Continuum.
    Featuring chapters by leading international scholars in Ancient Philosophy, the is a comprehensive one volume reference to guide to Socrates' thought.
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  5. Ian Evans & Nicholas D. Smith (2013). Knowledge. Polity.
    Introductions to the theory of knowledge are plentiful, but none introduce students to the most recent debates that exercise contemporary philosophers. Ian Evans and Nicholas D. Smith aim to change that.
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  6. Nicholas D. Smith (2013). Philosophical Reflection on Petitionary Prayer. Philosophy Compass 8 (3):309-317.
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  7. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2012). Response to Critics. Analytic Philosophy 53 (2):234-248.
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  8. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2012). Reply to Rowe. Journal of Ethics 16 (3):325-338.
    In our reply to Rowe, we explain why most of what he criticizes is actually the product of his misunderstanding our argument. We begin by showing that nearly all of his Part 1 misconceives our project by defending a position we never attacked. We then question why Rowe thinks the distinction we make between motivational and virtue intellectualism is unimportant before developing a defense of the consistency of our views about different desires. Next we turn to Rowe’s criticisms of our (...)
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  9. Alexis Mourenza & Nicholas D. Smith (2012). Knowledge Is Sexy. Philo 14 (1):43-58.
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  10. Hannah Tierney & Nicholas D. Smith (2012). Keith Lehrer on the Basing Relation. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):27-36.
    In this paper, we review Keith Lehrer’s account of the basing relation, with particular attention to the two cases he offered in support of his theory, Raco (Lehrer, Theory of knowledge, 1990; Theory of knowledge, (2nd ed.), 2000) and the earlier case of the superstitious lawyer (Lehrer, The Journal of Philosophy, 68, 311–313, 1971). We show that Lehrer’s examples succeed in making his case that beliefs need not be based on the evidence, in order to be justified. These cases show (...)
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  11. Nicholas D. Smith & Andrew C. Yip (2010). Partnership with God: A Partial Solution to the Problem of Petitionary Prayer. Religious Studies 46 (3):395 - 410.
    Why would God make us ask for some good He might supply, and why would it be right for God to withhold that good unless and until we asked for it? We explain why present defences of petitionary prayer are insufficient, but argue that a world in which God makes us ask for some goods and then supplies them in response to our petitions adds value to the world that would not be available in worlds in which God simply supplied (...)
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  12. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2009). Socratic Teaching and Socratic Method. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press.
     
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  13. Nicholas D. Smith (2009). Plato's Meno. Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):414-418.
  14. Nicholas D. Smith (2009). Thomas C. Brickhouse And. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press. 177.
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  15. Nicholas D. Smith (2009). The Cambridge Companion to Plato's Republic. Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):187-200.
  16. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2008). Is the Prudential Paradox in the Meno? Philosophical Inquiry 30 (3-4):175-184.
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  17. Nicholas D. Smith (2008). Modesty: A Contextual Account. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 82 (2):23 - 45.
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  18. Nicholas D. Smith (2008). Socrates in the Apology. Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):399 - 407.
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  19. Nicholas D. Smith, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.) (2008). Ancient Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub..
    Part of The Blackwell Readings in Philosophy Series, this survey of ancient philosophy explores the scope of ancient philosophy, focusing on the key philosophers and their texts, examining how the foundations of philosophy as we know it were laid. Focuses on the key philosophers and their texts, from Pre-Socratic thinkers through to the Neo-Platonists Brings together the key primary writings of Thales, Xenophanes, Parmenides, Anaxagoras, Gorgias, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Lucretius, Seneca, Sextus Empiricus, Plotinus, and many others Is broken down into (...)
     
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  20. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2007). Socrates on Akrasia, Knowledge, and the Power of Appearance. In Christopher Bobonich & Pierre Destrée (eds.), Akrasia in Greek Philosophy: From Socrates to Plotinus. Brill. 1--18.
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  21. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2007). Socrates on How Wrongdoing Damages the Soul. Journal of Ethics 11 (4):337 - 356.
    There has been little scholarly attention given to explaining exactly how and why Socrates thinks that wrongdoing damages the soul. But there is more than a simple gap in the literature here, we shall argue. The most widely accepted view of Socratic moral psychology, we claim, actually leaves this well-known feature of Socrates’ philosophy absolutely inexplicable. In the first section of this paper, we rehearse this view of Socratic moral psychology, and explain its inadequacy on the issue of the damaging (...)
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  22. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2006). Socrates and the Laws of Athens. Philosophy Compass 1 (6):564–570.
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  23. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2005). Socrates' "Daimonion" and Rationality. Apeiron 38 (2):43 - 62.
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  24. Pierre Destrée & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) (2005). Socrates' Divine Sign: Religion, Practice, and Value in Socratic Philosophy. Academic Printing and Pub..
     
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  25. Nicholas D.and Thomas Brickhouse Smith, Plato. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  26. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2004). Danielle Archibugi and Bengt-Ake Lundvall, Eds., The Globalizing Learn-Ing Economy. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 307 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-19-925817-1 (Pb). Simon Blackburn, Being Good. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003, 162 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-19-285377-5 (Pb). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 38:285-286.
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  27. Rachana Kamtekar, Mark McPherran, P. T. Geach, S. Marc Cohen, Gregory Vlastos, E. De Strycker, S. R. Slings, Donald Morrison, Terence Irwin, M. F. Burnyeat, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Richard Kraut, David Bostock & Verity Harte (2004). Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  28. Nicholas D. Smith (2004). Plato on Parts and Wholes: The Metaphysics of Structure (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (3):333-334.
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  29. Nicholas D. Smith (2004). Did Plato Write the "Alcibiades I?". Apeiron 37 (2):93 - 108.
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  30. Nicholas D. Smith (2003). Individual and Conflict in Greek Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):215-223.
  31. Nicholas D. Smith (2003). Socrates in the Agora: Some Thoughts About Philosophy as Talk. Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica 41 (104):165-174.
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  32. Thomas Baldwin, William Bechtel, Adele Abrahamsen, Richard Boothby, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Mario Bunge, Steven M. Cahn, Peter Markie & David Cockburn (2002). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 25 (1):107.
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  33. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) (2002). The Trial and Execution of Socrates: Sources and Controversies. Oxford University Press.
    Socrates is one of the most important yet enigmatic philosophers of all time; his fame has endured for centuries despite the fact that he never actually wrote anything. In 399 B.C.E., he was tried on the charge of impiety by the citizens of Athens, convicted by a jury, and sentenced to death (ordered to drink poison derived from hemlock). About these facts there is no disagreement. However, as the sources collected in this book and the scholarly essays that follow them (...)
     
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  34. Nicholas D. Smith (2002). Generic Knowledge. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (4):343 - 357.
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  35. Nicholas D. Smith (2002). Incurable Souls in Socratic Psychology. Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):21-36.
  36. Nicholas D. Smith (2002). Review of James A. Colaiaco, Socrates Against Athens: Philosophy on Trial. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (2).
  37. Richard Bett, Christopher Bobonich, David Bostock, Eric A. Brown, John M. Cooper, Dorothea Frede, David Gallop, Jonathan Lear, Nicholas D. Smith, Thomas M. Robinson, Christopher Shields, C. C. W. Taylor, Cass Weller & Bernard Williams (2001). Essays on Plato's Psychology. Lexington Books.
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  38. James Bohman, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Alan Brinkley, Tex Waco, James M. Buchanan, Richard A. Musgrave, John D. Caputo, Michael J. Scanlon & Christopher Cox (2001). G. John M. Abbarno, The Ethics of Homelessness. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1999, 258 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 90-420-0777-X, $22.00 (Pb). Robert B. Baker, Arthur L. Caplan, Linda L. Emanuel and Stephen R. Latham, Eds., The American Medical Ethics Revolution. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999, 396 Pp.(Indexed). ISBN 0-8018-6170. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35:285-289.
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  39. Nicholas D. Smith (2001). Some Thoughts About the Origins of ``Greek Ethics''. Journal of Ethics 5 (1):3-20.
    In this paper, I argue that several of the main issues that became a focus for classical Greek philosophy were initially framed by Homer. In particular, Homer identifies a tension between justice and individual excellence, and problematizes the connection between the heroic conception of excellence and ``eudaimonia'''' (happiness). The later philosophers address the problems raised in Homer by profoundly transforming the way each of these terms was to be conceived.
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  40. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (2000). Socrates' Gods and the Daimonion. In Nicholas D. Smith & Paul Woodruff (eds.), Reason and Religion in Socratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 74--88.
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  41. Nicholas D. Smith (2000). Martin McAvoy, The Profession of Ignorance, With Constant Reference to Socrates Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (3):201-202.
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  42. Nicholas D. Smith (2000). Plato on Knowledge as a Power. Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (2):145-168.
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  43. Nicholas D. Smith & Paul Woodruff (eds.) (2000). Reason and Religion in Socratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together mostly previously unpublished studies by prominent historians, classicists, and philosophers on the roles and effects of religion in Socratic philosophy and on the trial of Socrates. Among the contributors are Thomas C. Brickhouse, Asli Gocer, Richard Kraut, Mark L. McPherran, Robert C. T. Parker, C. D. C. Reeve, Nicholas D. Smith, Gregory Vlastos, Stephen A. White, and Paul B. Woodruff.
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  44. Nicholas D. Smith (1999). Images, Education, and Paradox in Plato's "Republic". Apeiron 32 (4):125 - 141.
    In this paper, I consider Plato's persistent and ubiquitous uses of imagery in the Republic, and compare his uses of images with what he says about the uses (and abuses) of imagery in the curricula he proposes for the kallipolis. I show how the dialogue itself might be suited to different levels of the proposed curricula--especially for those at the level of thought (dianoia)--but conclude that the dialogue was not intended to fit into the educational schemes of the 'kallipolis', but (...)
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  45. Nicholas D. Smith (1999). Plato's Analogy of Soul and State. Journal of Ethics 3 (1):31-49.
    In Part I of this paper, I argue that the arguments Plato offers for the tripartition of the soul are founded upon an equivocation, and that each of the valid options by which Plato might remove the equivocation will not produce a tripartite soul. In Part II, I argue that Plato is not wholly committed to an analogy of soul and state that would require either a tripartite state or a tripartite soul for the analogy to hold. It follows that (...)
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  46. Nicholas D. Smith (ed.) (1998). Plato: Critical Assessments. Routledge.
    The philosophy of Plato, universally acknowledged as the most important thinker of the Ancient World, is a major focus of contemporary attention - not only among philosophers, but also classicists and literary and political theorists. This set selects the best and most influential examples of Platonic scholarship published in English over the last fifty years, and adds translations of outstanding works published in other languages. It represents radically different scholarly approaches, and illuminates the key issues in the most hotly debated (...)
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  47. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1997). Socrates and the Unity of the Virtues. Journal of Ethics 1 (4):311-324.
    In the Protagoras, Socrates argues that each of the virtue-terms refers to one thing (: 333b4). But in the Laches (190c8–d5, 199e6–7), Socrates claims that courage is a proper part of virtue as a whole, and at Euthyphro 11e7–12e2, Socrates says that piety is a proper part of justice. But A cannot be both identical to B and also a proper part of B – piety cannot be both identical to justice and also a proper part of justice. In this (...)
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  48. Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith (1997). The Problem of Punishment in Socratic Philosophy. Apeiron 30 (4):95 - 107.
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  49. Nicholas D. Smith (1997). Colloquium 6. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):187-204.
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  50. Nicholas D. Smith (1997). How the Prisoners in Plato's Cave Are 'Like Us.'. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy 13:187-204.
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