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  1. Adam L. Alter, Daniel M. Oppenheimer & Nicholas Epley (2013). Disfluency Prompts Analytic Thinking—But Not Always Greater Accuracy: Response To. Cognition 128 (2):252-255.
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  2. Eugene M. Caruso, Adam Waytz & Nicholas Epley (2010). The Intentional Mind and the Hot Hand: Perceiving Intentions Makes Streaks Seem Likely to Continue. Cognition 116 (1):149-153.
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  3. Adam Waytz, Kurt Gray, Nicholas Epley & Daniel Wegner (2010). Causes and Consequences of Mind Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):383-388.
    Perceiving others’ minds is a crucial component of social life. People do not, however, always ascribe minds to other people, and sometimes ascribe minds to non-people (e.g. God, gadgets). This article reviews when mind perception occurs, when it does not, and why mind perception is important. Causes of mind perception stem both from the perceiver and perceived, and include the need for social connection (perceiver) and a similarity to oneself (perceived). Mind perception also has profound consequences for both the perceiver (...)
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  4. Nicholas Epley, Leaf Van Boven & Eugene M. Caruso (2004). Balance Where It Really Counts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):333-333.
    A balanced approach that considers human strengths and weaknesses will lead to a more flattering set of empirical findings, but will distract researchers from focusing on the mental processes that produce such findings and will diminish the practical implications of their work. Psychologists ought to be doing research that is theoretically informative and practically relevant, exactly as they are doing.
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