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Nicholas H. Smith [15]Nicholas Hugh Smith [1]
  1. Nicholas H. Smith, Rationality and Engagement : McDowell, Dreyfus and Zidane.
    The article examines John McDowell's attempt to rehabilitate the classical idea of the rational animal and Hubert Dreyfus's criticisms of that attempt. After outlining the 'engaged' conception of rationality which, in McDowell's view, enables the idea of the rational animal to shake off its intellectualist appearance, the objections posed by Dreyfus are presented that such a conception of rationality is inconsistent with the phenomena of everyday coping, characterised by non-conceptual 'involvement', and expertise, characterised by non-conceptual 'absorption'. Drawing on Michael Fried's (...)
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  2. Nicholas H. Smith & Jean-Philippe Deranty (eds.) (2011). New Philosophies of Labour: Work and the Social Bond. Brill.
    This volume addresses the long-standing neglect of the category of labour in critical social theory and it presents a powerful case for a new paradigm based on the anthropological significance of work and its role in shaping social bonds.
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  3. Nicholas H. Smith (2010). Peter Dews, The Idea of Evil (Oxford: Blackwell, 2008), Hardback, Isbn 9781405117043, 253 Pages,£ 50.00. [REVIEW] Critical Horizons 9 (1):99-101.
     
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  4. Nicholas H. Smith (2009). Work and the Struggle for Recognition. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (1):46-60.
    This article examines a neglected but crucial feature of Honneth's critical theory: its use of a concept of recognition to articulate the norms that are apposite for the contemporary world of work. The article shows that from his first writings on the structure of critical social theory in the early 1980s to the recent exchange with Nancy Fraser on recognition and redistribution, the problem of grounding a substantive critique of work under capitalism has been central to Honneth's enterprise. This answers (...)
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  5. Nicholas H. Smith & Arto Laitinen (2009). Taylor on Solidarity. Thesis Eleven 99 (1):48-70.
    After characterizing Taylor’s general approach to the problems of solidarity, we distinguish and reconstruct three contexts of solidarity in which this approach is developed: the civic, the socio-economic, and the moral. We argue that Taylor’s distinctive move in each of these contexts of solidarity is to claim that the relationship at stake poses normatively justified demands, which are motivationally demanding, but insufficiently motivating on their own. On Taylor’s conception, we need some understanding of extra motivational sources which explain why people (...)
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  6. Nicholas H. Smith (2008). Analysing Hope. Critical Horizons 9 (1):5-23.
    The paper contrasts two approaches to the analysis of hope: one that takes its departure from a view broadly shared by Hobbes, Locke and Hume, another that fits better with Aquinas's definition of hope. The former relies heavily on a sharp distinction between the cognitive and conative aspects of hope. It is argued that while this approach provides a valuable source of insights, its focus is too narrow and it rests on a problematic rationalistic psychology. The argument is supported by (...)
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  7. Nicholas H. Smith (2008). Levinas, Habermas and Modernity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (6):643-664.
    This article examines Levinas as if he were a participant in what Habermas has called `the philosophical discourse of modernity'. It begins by comparing Levinas' and Habermas' articulations of the philosophical problems of modernity. It then turns to how certain key motifs in Levinas' later work give philosophical expression to the needs of the times as Levinas diagnoses them. In particular it examines how Levinas interweaves a modern, post-ontological conception of `the religious' or `the sacred' into his account of subjectivity. (...)
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  8. Nicholas H. Smith (2008). The Idea of Evil. Critical Horizons 9 (1):99-101.
     
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  9. Nicholas H. Smith & Shane O'Neill (2008). Editors' Introduction. Critical Horizons 9 (1):1-3.
     
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  10. Nicholas H. Smith (2007). The Hermeneutics of Work: On Richard Sennett. Critical Horizons 8 (2):186-204.
    The paper attempts to situate Sennett philosophically by placing him in the tradition of ontological hermeneutics. This way of reading Sennett is justified not only by the core principles that govern Sennett's social anthropology, but is also useful for tracing the trajectory of Sennett's philosophically informed diagnoses of the times. These diagnoses focus on the role of work in shaping subjectivity. After reconstructing the basic conceptual shape of Sennett's diagnoses of the work-related maladies of the "old" and the "new" capitalism, (...)
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  11. Nicholas H. Smith (2005). Hope and Critical Theory. Critical Horizons 6 (1):45-61.
    In the first part of the paper I consider the relative neglect of hope in the tradition of critical theory. I attribute this neglect to a low estimation of the cognitive, aesthetic, and moral value of hope, and to the strong—but, I argue, contingent—association that holds between hope and religion. I then distinguish three strategies for thinking about the justification of social hope; one which appeals to a notion of unfulfilled or frustrated natural human capacities, another which invokes a providential (...)
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  12. Nicholas H. Smith (2005). Rorty on Religion and Hope. Inquiry 48 (1):76 – 98.
    The article considers how Richard Rorty's writings on religion dovetail with his views on the philosophical significance of hope. It begins with a reconstruction of the central features of Rorty's philosophy of religion, including its critique of theism and its attempt to rehabilitate religion within a pragmatist philosophical framework. It then presents some criticisms of Rorty's proposal. It is argued first that Rorty's "redescription" of the fulfilment of the religious impulse is so radical that it is hard to see what (...)
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  13. Arto Laitinen & Nicholas Hugh Smith (2002). Perspectives on the Philosophy of Charles Taylor. Acta Philosophica Fennica.
    The essays in this volume offer a range of new perspectives on Charles Taylor's philosophy. Part one addresses key metaphilosophical themes such as the role of transcendental arguments, the critique of representationalism, and the dialectics of Enlightenment. Part two critically examines Taylor's views on personhood, selfhood and interpersonal recognition. Part three discusses issues in Taylor's moral and political theory, including the nature of his moral realism, his theory of modernity, and his critical appropriation of the liberal tradition. The book concludes (...)
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  14. Nicholas H. Smith (2002). Charles Taylor: Meaning, Morals, and Modernity. Polity Press.
    Clearly written and authoritative, this book will be welcomed by students and researchers in a wide range of disciplines, including philosophy, psychology, ...
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  15. Nicholas H. Smith (1997). Review Essay : Reason After Meaning: Charles Taylor, Philosophical Arguments (Cambridge, Ma: Harvard University Press, 1995). Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (1):131-140.
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  16. Nicholas H. Smith (1997). Strong Hermeneutics: Contingency and Moral Identity. Routledge.
    Strong Hermeneutics presents a compelling case for the importance of hermeneutics in understanding ethics today. It provides a critical comparison of the enlightenment view of ethics with the postmodern or "weak" view of ethics. The weak view, which Nicholas H. Smith traces back to Nietzsche and identifies in the recent work of Rorty and Lyotard, is skeptical of any universal principles in ethics. The enlightenment view, starting with Kant and taken up in the work of Habermas, casts identity as subject (...)
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