Search results for 'Nicholas S. Patapis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  36
    David S. Festinger, Kattiya Ratanadilok, Douglas B. Marlowe, Karen L. Dugosh, Nicholas S. Patapis & David S. DeMatteo (2007). Neuropsychological Functioning and Recall of Research Consent Information Among Drug Court Clients. Ethics and Behavior 17 (2):163 – 186.
    Evidence suggests that research participants often fail to recall much of the information provided during the informed consent process. This study was conducted to determine the proportion of consent information recalled by drug court participants following a structured informed consent procedure and the neuropsychological factors that were related to recall. Eighty-five participants completed a standard informed consent procedure to participate in an ongoing research study, followed by a 17-item consent quiz and a brief neuropsychological battery 2 weeks later. Participants performed (...)
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  2. Jasper Nicholas & Hopkins (2001). Complete Philosophical and Theological Treatises of Nicholas of Cusa.
    http://www.cla.umn.edu/jhopkins/ Taken together, twenty-four of these works constitute Nicholas of Cusa’s complete philosophical and theological treatises. They must be supplemented by studying his richly conceptual sermons, along with his ecclesiological and exegetical writings such as De Concordantia Catholica and Coniectura de Ultimis Diebus. His mathematical writings are also of interest, even though they are not of lasting importance, as Gottfried Leibniz rightly recognized.
     
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  3.  17
    Jeffery Nicholas (2012). Reason, Tradition, and the Good: Macintyre's Tradition-Constituted Reason and Frankfurt School Critical Theory. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Introduction: the question of reason -- The Frankfurt School critique of reason -- Habermas's communicative rationality -- Macintyre's tradition-constituted reason -- A substantive reason -- Beyond relativism: reasonable progress and learning from -- Conclusion: toward a Thomistic-Aristotelian critical theory of society.
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  4.  35
    John Nicholas (1982). Book Review:Black Body Theory and the Quantum Discontinuity, 1894-1912 T. S. Kuhn. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 49 (2):295-.
  5.  2
    Jeffery Nicholas (2012). Nelson Rivera , The Earth is Our Home: Mary Midgley's Reconstruction of Evolution and Its Meanings . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 32 (3):205-210.
  6.  13
    Ryan McDermott (2013). Henri de Lubac's Genealogy of Modern Exegesis and Nicholas of Lyra's Literal Sense of Scripture. Modern Theology 29 (1):124-156.
    According to Henri de Lubac's history of medieval exegesis, the fourteenth century marked the tipping point for the disintegration of history and allegory. The Postilla super totam bibliam of the Franciscan Nicholas of Lyra plays a prominent role in this declension narrative by ceding the “spirit” of interpretation to the separate discipline of theology, and opening the space for critical biblical studies to attain autonomy. But what if Nicholas of Lyra was on the other side of this history? (...)
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  7. Jasper Hopkins, Nicholas of Cusa's Didactic Sermons: A Selection.
    The title of this present volume tends to be misleading. For it suggests that Nicholas’s didactic sermons are to be distinguished from his non-didactic ones—ones that are, say, more inspirational and less philosophical, or more devotional and less theological, or more situationally oriented and less Scripturally focused. Yet, in truth, all 293 of Nicholas’s sermons are highly didactic, highly pedagogical, highly exegetical.1 To be sure, there are inspirational and devotional elements; but they are subordinate to the primary purpose (...)
     
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  8.  48
    Paul Weithman (2009). Nicholas Wolterstorff's Justice: Rights and Wrongs: An Introduction. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):179-192.
    This introduction sets the stage for four papers on Nicholas Wolterstorff's Justice: Rights and Wrongs , written by Harold Attridge, Oliver O'Donovan, Richard Bernstein, and myself. In his book, Wolterstorff defends an account of human rights. The first section of this introduction distinguishes Wolterstorff's account of rights from the alternative account of rights against which he contends. The alternative account draws much of its power from a historical narrative according to which theory and politics supplanted earlier ways of thinking (...)
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  9.  7
    Joseph W. Ulatowski (2005). Review of Nicholas Griffin's The Cambridge Companion to Bertrand Russell. Disputatio 1:282-286.
    In this brief article, I review Nicholas Griffin's edited anthology The Cambridge Companion to Bertrand Russell.
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  10.  12
    Małgorzata Czarnocka (2012). On Nicholas Maxwell's Project of Transition From Knowledge to Wisdom. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (3):67-77.
    Nicholas Maxwell’s project, among others the character of its philosophical foundations, the notion of wisdom, and its radical post-Enlightenment scientism are discussed, and some doubts regard to it are presented. Above all, it is argued that Maxwell’s proposal of the establishing of world confederations of scientists standing above governments might lead to a totalitarian system.
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  11.  5
    Anna Michalska (2012). Knowledge Society or Wisdom Society? Nicholas Maxwell's Philosophical Project Against the Background of Philosophical Tradition. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (3):115-132.
    The article discusses philosophical foundations of Nicholas Maxwell’s theory of scientific knowledge—Aim Oriented Empiricism (AOE). It is demonstrated that AOE evokes many illuminating, overshadowed by positivistic tradition, insights on the nature of cognition, language, and the relationship between philosophy and strict sciences. It corresponds with Jürgen Habermas’s theory of speech acts and R. G. Collingwood’s account of philosophical method. What calls serious doubts, though, is the very way in which Maxwell relates his conception to the project of wisdom society. (...)
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  12.  13
    Joseph W. Ulatowski (2004). Review of Nicholas Rescher's Paradoxes. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 78 (3):514-517.
    In this brief article, I review Nicholas Rescher's Paradoxes.
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  13.  17
    Charles W. Harvey (2007). Comments on Nicholas Georgalis's “First-Person Methodologies: A View From Outside the Phenomenological Tradition”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (S1):113-120.
    Three problems are raised for Nicholas Georgalis’s recent work: a problem with regard to the supposed noninferential knowledge of minimal content, a problem with the “necessary condition” Georgalis stipulates for the legitimate application of a first-person methodology to a science of the mind, and a problem with regard to denying phenomenal content to intentional acts.
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  14.  10
    Sarah Powrie (2013). The Importance of Fourteenth-Century Natural Philosophy for Nicholas of Cusa's Infinite Universe. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):33-53.
    This paper argues that Nicholas of Cusa’s investigation of infinity and incommensurability in De docta ignorantia was shaped by the mathematical innovations and thought experiments of fourteenth-century natural philosophy. Cusanus scholarship has overlooked this influence, in part because Raymond Klibansky’s influential edition of De docta ignorantia situated Cusa within the medieval Platonic tradition. However, Cusa departs from this tradition in a number of ways. His willingness to engage incommensurability and to compare different magnitudes of infinity distinguishes him from his (...)
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  15.  17
    Natika Newton (2003). A Critical Review of Nicholas Maxwell's the Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will, and Evolution. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):149 – 156.
    Nicholas Maxwell takes on the ambitious project of explaining, both epistemologically and metaphysically, the physical universe and human existence within it. His vision is appealing; he unites the physical and the personal by means of the concepts of aim and value, which he sees as the keys to explaining traditional physical puzzles. Given the current popularity of theories of goal-oriented dynamical systems in biology and cognitive science, this approach is timely. But a large vision requires firm and nuanced arguments (...)
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  16. Axel Wüstehube & Michael Quante (eds.) (1998). Pragmatic Idealism: Critical Essays on Nicholas Rescher's System of Pragmatic Idealism. Rodopi.
    The "System of Pragmatic Idealism" is of special importance for Nicholas Rescher's philosophical work, because here he has presented the systematic approach at once. Dedicated to his 70th birthday a group of European and U.S-american philosophers discuss the main topics of Rescher's philosophical system. The contributions which are presented here for the first time and Nicholas Rescher's responses cover the most important topics of philosophy and give a deep anddetailed insight into the strenght of Rescher's pragmatic idealism. This (...)
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  17.  1
    C. J. Nederman (2000). Community and the Rise of Commercial Society: Political Economy and Political Theory in Nicholas Oresme's De Moneta. History of Political Thought 21 (1):1-15.
    Nicholas Oresme's mid-fourteenth-century treatise De moneta falls outside the conventional genres of late medieval scholastic writing: it is neither a commentary, a summa, nor a publicistic tract. Historians of political thought have largely shunned the work. Instead, De moneta has primarily been the object of attention among historians of economic thought. Despite the fact that De moneta certainly contains technical economic analysis of the nature of money in an Aristotelian mode, both the circumstances of its composition and the main (...)
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  18.  3
    F. B. A. Asiedu (2001). Illocutionary Acts and the Uncanny: On Nicholas Wolterstorff's Idea of Divine Discourse. Heythrop Journal 42 (3):283–310.
    Nicholas Wolterstorff's Divine Discourse attempts to give philosophical warrant to the claim that ‘God speaks’. While Wolterstorff's argument depends largely on his appropriation of J.L. Austin's speech act theory, he also uses two narratives that for him demonstrate how ‘God speaks’. The first is the story of Augustine's conversion in the Confessions and the second is a story that Wolterstorff recounts about a certain ‘Virginia’. This study argues that what Wolterstorff claims to derive from Augustine's narrative for his view (...)
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  19. Jasper Hopkins, Prolegomena to Nicholas of Cusa's Conception of the Relationship of Faith to Reason.
    Is there any such thing as the Cusan view of the relationship between faith and reason? That is, does Nicholas present us with clear concepts of fides and ratio and with a unique and consistent doctrine regarding their interconnection? If he does not, then the task before us is surely an impossible one: viz., the task of finding, describing, and setting in perspective a doctrine that never at all existed. For even with spectacles made of beryl stone or through (...)
     
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  20. Brian Domino (2016). Nietzsche's Last Laugh : Ecce Homo as Satire by Nicholas D. More. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):303-305.
    When Ecce Homo was finally published in 1908, a New York Times reviewer declared that its “the most interesting portions... are those in which Nietzsche..., without delving into the depths of philosophy, shows himself primarily as a master of charming satirical prose”. The review largely consists of quotations in which Nietzsche satirizes, which is to say, mocks, Germans. The author apparently missed Nietzsche’s sarcastic report of another reviewer who characterized Thus Spoke Zarathustra “as an advanced exercise in style, and expressed (...)
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  21. André L. Goddu (1995). Consequences and Conditional Propositions in John of Glogovia’s and Michael of Biestrzykowa’s Commentaries on Peter of Spain and Their Possible Influence on on Nicholas Copernicus. Archives d'Histoire Doctrinale et Littéraire du Moyen Âge 62:137-188.
    In their commentaries on Peter of Spain’s texts, two professors at the University of Cracow, John of Glogovia and Michael of Biestrzykowa, provided interpretations of consequences and conditional propositions which either rejected the paradoxes of strict implication or placed on them such restrictions as to challenge traditional views about the relation between antecedent and consequent. Nicholas Copernicus may have been inflenced by those discussions.
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  22. Michele Marsonet (1995). The Primacy of Practical Reason: An Essay on Nicholas Rescher's Philosophy. Upa.
    This book presents, in one single volume, the first cogent overview of Nicholas Rescher's position in theoretical philosophy. Marsonet's wide ranging knowledge of American philosophy enables him to position Rescher's work in the wider setting of its relationships with various contemporary American and European thinkers.
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  23. Axel Wüstehube & Michael Quante (eds.) (1998). Pragmatic Idealism: Critical Essays on Nicholas Rescher’s System of Pragmatic Idealism. Brill | Rodopi.
    The System of Pragmatic Idealism is of special importance for Nicholas Rescher's philosophical work, because here he has presented the systematic approach at once. Dedicated to his 70th birthday a group of European and U.S-american philosophers discuss the main topics of Rescher's philosophical system. The contributions which are presented here for the first time and Nicholas Rescher's responses cover the most important topics of philosophy and give a deep and detailed insight into the strenght of Rescher's pragmatic idealism. (...)
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  24.  14
    Joseph F. Scheuer (1965). Nicholas S. Timasheff and the Sociology of Recurrence. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 40 (3):432-448.
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  25.  12
    A. C. Genova (2003). Review of Nicholas S. Smith, (Ed), Reading McDowell on Mind and World. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (3).
  26. Luca Zavagno (2013). Michael J. K. Walsh, Peter W. Edbury, and Nicholas S. H. Coureas, Eds., Medieval and Renaissance Famagusta: Studies in Architecture, Art and History. Farnham, UK, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2012. Pp. Xxx, 341 Plus 23 Color Plates; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $119.95. ISBN: 9781409435570. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (4):1184-1186.
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  27. Massimo Pigliucci (2014). Philosophy and the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Edited by Nicholas Joll. [REVIEW] Philosophy Now 104 (104):42-43.
    Years ago I was set to spend a full weekend in my apartment, as it was forecast to snow outside. I decided that I needed some good reading to keep me company. I had heard of something called The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (1979), which was supposed to be clever and funny. It was, and I’ve never traveled without a towel since. ...
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  28.  51
    Kevin Carnahan (2013). Religion, and Not Just Religious Reasons, in the Public Square: A Consideration of Robert Audi's and Nicholas Wolterstorff's Religion in the Public Square. Philosophia 41 (2):397-409.
    For the last several decades, philosophers have wrestled with the proper place of religion in liberal societies. Usually, the debates among these philosophers have started with the articulation of various conceptions of liberalism and then proceeded to locate religion in the context of these conceptions. In the process, however, too little attention has been paid to the way religion is conceived. Drawing on the work of Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff, two scholars who are often read as holding opposing (...)
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  29.  45
    Scott F. Aikin & Jason Aleksander (2013). Nicholas of Cusa's De Pace Fidei and the Meta-Exclusivism of Religious Pluralism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (2):219-235.
    In response to the fall of Constantinople in 1453, Nicholas of Cusa wrote De pace fidei defending a commitment to religious tolerance on the basis of the notion that all diverse rites are but manifestations of one true religion. Drawing on a discussion of why Nicholas of Cusa is unable to square the two objectives of arguing for pluralistic tolerance and explaining the contents of the one true faith, we outline why theological pluralism is compromised by its own (...)
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  30. Nicholas Rescher (2006). Nicholas Rescher’s Publications on Leibniz. In Studies in Leibniz's Cosmology. De Gruyter 207-210.
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  31.  16
    Stephen Puryear (2014). Rescher, Nicholas., Leibniz and Cryptography: An Account on the Occasion of the Initial Exhibition of the Reconstruction of Leibniz’s Cipher Machine. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 67 (4):882-884.
    In Part 1 of this short book, Rescher provides an overview of the nature and source of Leibniz’s interest in the theory and practice of cryptanalysis, including his unsuccessful bid to secure an apprentice for John Wallis (1616-1703) with a view to perpetuating the Englishman’s remarkable deciphering abilities. In Part 2, perhaps the most interesting part of the book, Rescher offers his account of the inner workings of Leibniz’s cipher machine. Part 3 provides a brief pictorial history of such machines (...)
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  32.  15
    J. S. Swindell (2009). La Americana. Documentary Film. Written and Directed by Nicholas Bruckman. Bolivia/USA: People's Television, 2008. Run Time: 65 Min. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):393-395.
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  33.  27
    John L. Longeway (1987). Nicholas of Cusa and Man's Knowledge of God. Philosophy Research Archives 13:289-313.
    I argue that Nicholas of Cusa agrees with Thomas Aquinas on the metaphysics of analogy in God, but differs on epistemology, taking a Platonic position against Aquinas’ Aristotelianism. As a result Cusa has to rethink Thomas’ solution to the problem of discourse about God. In De docta ignorantia he uses the mathematics of the infinite as a clue to the relations between a thing and its Measure and this allows him, he thinks, to adapt Aquinas’ approach to the problem (...)
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  34.  20
    J. Porter (2010). Comments on Nicholas Wolterstorff's Justice: Rights and Wrongs. Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (2):192-196.
    Wolterstorff ’s Justice: Rights and Wrongs is a bold and welcome theological defense of human rights, carrying radical implications for moral and legal philosophy. However, Wolterstorff’s concept of the scope of human rights is too comprehensive and thereby paradoxically weakens the force of the human rights claims he rightly champions. Rights claims are not coterminous with obligations generally but represent very distinctive claims, notably the power of individuals to demand specific kinds of forbearance or treatment from specifiable others; Tierney has (...)
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  35.  12
    J. S. Swindell Blumenthal-Barby (2009). La Americana . Documentary Film. Written and Directed by Nicholas Bruckman. Bolivia/Usa: People's Television, 2008. Run Time: 65 Min. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3).
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  36. Brian S. Donaghey (1987). Nicholas Trevet's Use of King Alfred's Translation of Boethius, and the Dating of His Commentary,'. In A. J. Minnis (ed.), The Medieval Boethius: Studies in the Vernacular Translations of de Consolatione Philosophiae. D.S. Brewer 1--31.
     
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  37. Lewis S. Ford (1974). Nicholas Rescher's "The Coherence Theory of Truth". [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (1):118.
     
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  38. Thomas A. Goudge (1979). Nicholas Rescher, "Peirce's Philosophy of Science: Critical Studies in His Theory of Induction and Scientific Method". [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 15 (2):176.
     
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  39. Jasper Hopkins, Nicholas & Johannes Wenck (eds.) (1981). Nicholas of Cusa's Debate with John Wenck: A Translation and an Appraisal of De Ignota Litteratura and Apologia Doctae Ignorantiae. A.J. Banning Press.
  40. Nicholas D. More & Dennis Vanden Auweele (2014). Nicholas D. More: Nietzsche’s Last Laugh. Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 67 (4):379-381.
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  41. Miriam Riley (2006). Europe's Antipodes: Cultural Traffic in the Work of Nicholas Thomas. Thesis Eleven 87 (1):122-133.
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  42.  5
    Roman Murawski (2016). Between Theology and Mathematics. Nicholas of Cusa’s Philosophy of Mathematics. Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 44 (1):97-110.
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  43.  5
    Michael J. Olson (forthcoming). Locke's Touchy Subjects: Materialism and Immortality, by Nicholas Jolley. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
  44.  1
    André Goddu (2016). Ludwik Antoni Birkenmajer and Curtis Wilson on the Origin of Nicholas Copernicus’s Heliocentrism. Isis 107 (2):225-253.
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  45.  11
    Marcy P. Lascano (2007). Studies in Leibniz's Cosmology (Nicholas Rescher Collected Papers Volume XIII). The Leibniz Review 17:183-191.
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  46.  10
    Paul E. Beichner (1952). Chaucer's Hende Nicholas. Mediaeval Studies 14 (1):151-153.
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  47.  16
    Mary Louise Lord (1992). Virgil's Eclogues, Nicholas Trevet, and the Harmony of the Spheres. Mediaeval Studies 54 (1):186-273.
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  48.  38
    Anthony F. D'Elia (2007). Stefano Porcari's Conspiracy Against Pope Nicholas V in 1453 and Republican Culture in Papal Rome. Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (2):207-231.
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  49.  14
    Frederick G. Whelan (1993). Nicholas Capaldi and Donald W. Livingston, Eds., Liberty in Hume's History of England, Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1990, Pp. Xii + 226. [REVIEW] Utilitas 5 (1):133.
  50.  13
    Craig A. Staudenbaur (1981). A Companion to Plato's Republic. By Nicholas P. White. Modern Schoolman 58 (4):278-280.
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