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  1. Nicholas S. Thompson, Carolyn Olson & Brian Dessureau (forthcoming). Babies' Cries: Who's Listening? Who's Being Fooled? Social Research.
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  2. Eric P. Charles, Michael D. Bybee & Nicholas S. Thompson (2011). Abehaviorist Account of Emotions and Feelings: Making Sense of James D. Laird's Feelings: The Perception of Self. Behavior and Philosophy 39:1-16.
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  3. Gillian A. Barker, Patrick G. Derr & Nicholas S. Thompson (2004). The Perils of Confusing Nesting with Chaining in Psychological Explanations. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (2):293 - 303.
    Despite its diminished importance amongst philosophers, the deductive-nomological framework is still important to contemporary behavioral scientists. Behavioral theorists operating within this framework must be careful to distinguish between nesting and chaining. Explanations are chained when the explanandum sentence of one explanation is one of the antecedent conditions of another. They are nested when one of the antecedent conditions or the explanandum sentence of one explanation is one of the covering laws of another. Confusion between nesting and chaining leads to explanation (...)
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  4. Rosemarie Sokol & Nicholas S. Thompson (2004). Cached, Carried, or Crèched. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):523-523.
    We believe that “caching” a baby would have been too great a danger in human prehistory, and thus could not serve as the context for prelinguistic vocalization. Rather, infants were most likely carried at all times. Thus, the question arises of why the cry of an infant is such a loud vocalization.
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  5. Sarah L. Strout, Rosemarie I. Sokol, James D. Laird & Nicholas S. Thompson (2004). The Evolutionary Foundation of Perceiving One's Own Emotions. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (2):493 - 502.
    Much research in the field of emotions has shown that people differ in the cues that they use to perceive their own emotions. People who are more responsive to personal cues (personal cuers) make use of cues arising from their own bodies and behavior; people who are less responsive to personal cues (situational cuers) make use of cues arising from the world around them. An evolutionary explanation of this well-documented phenomenon is that it occurs because of the operation of a (...)
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  6. Nicholas S. Thompson, Rosemarie Sokol & Donald H. Owings (2004). Shouldn't Mother Know Best? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):473-474.
    We find the idea that infant crying arises from thermoregulation more consistent with a coregulatory account of its evolutionary history than it is with the informational account advocated in the target article.
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  7. Nicholas S. Thompson (2002). Adaptation for, Exaptation As. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):531-532.
    The expression exapted as is offered as a substitute for the target article's exaptation for and exaptation to on the grounds that exapted as is less likely to foster the pernicious intuition that natural selection designs for future consequences.
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  8. Nicholas S. Thompson (2001). Avoiding Vicious Circularity Requires More Than a Modicum of Care. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):557-558.
    Any general account of successful selection explanations must specify how they avoid being ad hoc or vacuous, hazards that arise from their recursive form.
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  9. Nicholas S. Thompson (2000). Evolutionary Psychology Can Ill Afford Adaptionist and Mentalist Credulity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1013-1014.
    The idea that dreams function as fright-simulations rests on the adaptionist notion that anything that has form has function, and psychological argument relies on the mentalist assumption that dream reports are accurate reports of experienced events. Neither assumption seems adequately supported by the evidence presented. [Revonsuo].
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  10. Nicholas S. Thompson (2000). Niche Construction and Group Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):161-162.
    The antipathy toward group selection expressed in the target article is puzzling because Laland et al.'s ideas dovetail neatly with modern group selection theory.
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  11. Felicity A. Huntingford, David H. Owings, Michael D. Beecher & Nicholas S. Thompson (1999). A Melting Pot of Ideas on CommunicationPerspectives in Ethology. Vol. 12: Communication. BioScience 49 (3):235.
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  12. Nicholas S. Thompson (1999). High Purpose, Low Execution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):910-911.
    In reasserting the primacy of the individual in biological analysis, Rose directs attention away from the crucial insights of the developmental/structuralist perspective that he advocates. In presenting his advocacy as a diatribe, he brings disrespect down upon that very tradition.
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  13. Nicholas S. Thompson (1998). Reintroducing “Reintroducing Group Selection to the Human Behavioral Sciences”to BBS Readers. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):304-305.
    Wilson and Sober's (1994t) revival of group selection theory may have failed with some readers because its simple arithmetic foundation was obscured under the complexities of its presentation. When that uncontrovertible principle is uncovered, it broadens dramatically the fundamental motives that social scientists may impute to human nature and still be consistent with Darwinian evolutionary theory.
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  14. R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.) (1997). Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. SUNY Press.
    This is the first book to evaluate the significance and usefulness of the practices of anthropomorphism and anecdotalism for understanding animals.
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  15. Robert W. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. Lyn Miles (1997). Taking Anthropomorphism and Anecdotes Seriously. In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. 3--11.
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  16. Nicholas S. Thompson (1995). Does Language Arise From a Calculus of Dominance? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):387.
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  17. Nicholas S. Thompson (1994). Vehicles All the Way Down? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):638-638.
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  18. Nicholas S. Thompson (1993). Are Some Mental States Public Events? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):662.
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  19. Nicholas S. Thompson (1993). Oh No! Not Social Darwinism Again! Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):309.
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  20. Nicholas S. Thompson (1993). Why Alison Gopnik Should Be a Behaviorist. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):83.
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  21. Nicholas S. Thompson & Patrick G. Derr (1993). The Intentionality of Some Ethological Terms. Behavior and Philosophy 2 (21):15-24.
    The apparent incompatibility of mental states with physical explanations has long been a concern of philosophers of psychology. This incompatibility is thought to arise from the intentionality of mental states. But, Brentano notwithstanding, intentionality is an ordinary feature of higher order behavior patterns in the classical literature of ethology.
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  22. Nicholas S. Thompson (1990). Why Would We Ever Doubt That Species Are Intelligent? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):94.
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  23. Nicholas S. Thompson (1988). Deception and Descriptive Mentalism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):266.
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