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  1. Nicholas Wolterstorff (forthcoming). Can Ontology Do Without Events? Grazer Philosophische Studien 7:177-201.
    In his book Persons and Objects, Professor Chisholm undertakes to show the satisfactoriness of an ontology which does not admit the existence of concrete events, such as sneezings, runnings, etc. He attempts to show that if we allow the existence of states of affairs, these being everlastingly existing entities, we need not acknowledge the existence of those perishing entities which are concrete events. I n this paper I discuss the tenability of this contention, considering especially whether the reductions that Chisholm (...)
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  2. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2013). All Justice is Social but It's Not All Social Justice. Philosophia 41 (2):383-395.
    I take social injustice to be injustice perpetrated on members of society by laws and public social practices. I take social justice to be the struggle to right social injustice. After explaining these ideas, I then address the question: why are so many people opposed to the very idea of social justice? I offer a number of explanations, among them, that to acknowledge that there is social injustice in one’s society often requires considerable change on one’s part.
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  3. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2013). C. S. Lewis on the Problem of Suffering. Res Philosophica 90 (1):33-48.
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  4. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2013). Is It Possible and Sometimes Desirable for States to Forgive? Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (3):417-434.
    After discussing at some length the nature of interpersonal forgiveness and its relation to punishment, the author addresses the main question of the essay: are states the sorts of entities that can forgive; and if they are, is it sometimes desirable that they forgive? The author argues that states can forgive and very often do; and that sometimes it is desirable that they do so. The essay closes by considering the complexities that arise when the state wants to forgive but (...)
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  5. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2013). Reply to Kevin Carnahan and Erik A. Anderson. Philosophia 41 (2):429-435.
    In my response to Kevin Carnahan, I explain the concept of religion that I have been working with in my writings on the place of religious reasons in public political discourse. While acknowledging that religion is often privatized, my concern has been with religion as a way of life. It is religion so understood that raises the most serious issues concerning the role of religion in public discourse. In my response to Erik A. Anderson, I go beyond what I have (...)
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  6. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2013). The Image in Mind: Theism, Naturalism, and the Imagination, by Charles Taliaferro and Jil Evans. Faith and Philosophy 30 (1):111-114.
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  7. Nicholas Wolterstorff, Richard J. Bernstein & Claudia Card (2013). Portraits of American Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  8. Mark Schroeder, Jonathan Way, Gregg Strauss, Tim Willenken, Matthew Talbert, Angela M. Smith, James A. Montmarquet, Nicole Hassoun, Virginia Held & Nicholas Wolterstorff (2012). 10. Robert S. Taylor, Reconstructing Rawls: The Kantian Foundations of Justice as Fairness Robert S. Taylor, Reconstructing Rawls: The Kantian Foundations of Justice as Fairness (Pp. 632-637). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (3).
     
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  9. Charles Taylor, Fred Dallmayr, William Schweiker, Nicholas Wolterstorff, J. Budziszewski, Jeanne Heffernan Schindler, Joshua Mitchell, Robin Lovin, Jonathan Chaplin, Michael L. Budde, Jean Porter, Eloise A. Buker, Christopher Beem, Peter Berkowitz & Jean Bethke Elshtain (2012). Theology and Public Philosophy: Four Conversations. Lexington Books.
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  10. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2012). Kateb , George . Human Dignity . Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011. Pp. 238+Xiii. $22.95 (Cloth). Ethics 122 (3):602-607.
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  11. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2012). Understanding Liberal Democracy. Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents influential work by Nicholas Wolterstorff at the intersection between political philosophy and religion, alongside nine new essays on the nature of liberal democracy, human rights, and political authority.
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  12. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2011). Crossing the Threshold of Divine Revelation. Faith and Philosophy 28 (1):102-108.
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  13. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2011). Response to Jean Porter's Ministers of the Law. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 8 (2):315-323.
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  14. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2011). Then, Now, and Al. Faith and Philosophy 28 (3):253-266.
    In this article I review some of the more important developments in philosophy of the past fifty years with the aim of pointing out the contribution that the work of Alvin Plantinga has made to these developments. Along the way I also highlight the most important enduring themes in Plantinga’s work.
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  15. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2010). Inquiring About God. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume collects Wolterstorff's essays on the philosophy of religion written over the last thirty-five years.
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  16. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2010). Justice: Rights and Wrongs. Princeton University Press.
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  17. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2010). Ontologia das obras de arte. Crítica.
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  18. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2010). Practices of Belief. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume brings together Nicholas Wolterstorff's essays on epistemology written between 1983 and 2008.
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  19. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2010). Religion in Public Life. Faith and Philosophy 27 (2):223-225.
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  20. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2009). How Philosophical Theology Became Possible Within the Analytic Tradition of Philosophy. In Oliver D. Crisp & Michael C. Rea (eds.), Analytic Theology: New Essays in the Philosophy of Theology. Oxford Up. 155--69.
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  21. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2009). Jesus and Forgiveness. In Paul K. Moser (ed.), Jesus and Philosophy: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
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  22. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2009). Justice as Inherent Rights: A Response to My Commentators. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (2):261-279.
    The critical comments by my fellow symposiasts on my book, Justice: Rights and Wrongs , have provided me with the opportunity to clarify parts of my argument and to correct some misunderstandings; they have also helped me see more clearly than I did before the import of some parts of my argument. In his comments, Paul Weithman points out features of the right order conception of justice that I had not noticed. They have also prodded me to clarify in what (...)
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  23. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2009). Reid on Justice. In Sabine Roeser (ed.), Reid on Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
  24. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2009). Why Can't We Just Get Along With Each Other? In Nigel Biggar & Linda Hogan (eds.), Religious Voices in Public Places. Oup Oxford.
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  25. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2007). A Life in Philosophy. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 81 (2):93 - 106.
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  26. Paul Bloom, Gareth B. Matthews, Scott MacDonald, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Paul Helm, Ishtiyaque Haji, Garry Wills & Richard Sorabji (2006). Augustine's Confessions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  27. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2006). What Sort of Epistemological Realist Was Thomas Reid? Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (2):111-124.
    Reid's theory of perception has long been cited as a paradigmatic example of direct realism; and the term “direct” undoubtedly carries the connotation that external objects are items in “the manifold of intuition.” There are important ways in which perception, on Reid's analysis, undoubtedly is immediate and direct. Nonetheless, this paper contends that, with the exception of his account of our perception of visible fi gure, Reid's theory is not an example of direct realism, if a condition of a theory (...)
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  28. William P. Alston, Laurence Bonjour, Carl Ginet, Alvin I. Goldman, John Greco, George I. Mavrodes, Philip L. Quinn, Alessandra Tanesini, Nicholas Wolterstorff & Linda Zagzebski (2005). Perspectives on the Philosophy of William P. Alston. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  29. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2005). Beardsley's Approach. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (2):191–195.
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  30. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2005). Does Forgiveness Undermine Justice? In Andrew Dole & Andrew Chignell (eds.), God and the Ethics of Belief: New Essays in Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  31. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2005). Jeffrey Stout on Democracy and its Contemporary Christian Critics. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):633-647.
    Jeffrey Stout addresses two of the main criticisms of liberal democracy by its contemporary neotraditionalist Christian critics: that liberal democracy is destructive of social tradition, and thereby of virtue in the citizenry, and that liberal democracy is inherently secular, committed to expunging religious voices from the public arena. I judge that Stout effectively answers these charges: liberal democracy has its own tradition, it cultivates the virtues relevant to that, and it is not inherently hostile to piety. What Stout does not (...)
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  32. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2004). Art and the Aesthetic : The Religious Dimension. In Peter Kivy (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aesthetics. Blackwell Pub.. 325--339.
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  33. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2004). God and Darkness in Reid. In Joseph Houston (ed.), Thomas Reid: Context, Influence, Significance. Dunedin Academic Press. 77--102.
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  34. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2004). 3 Reid on Common Sense. In Terence Cuneo Rene van Woudenberg (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge University Press. 77.
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  35. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2003). An Engagement with Rorty. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (1):129 - 139.
  36. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2003). Abrol Fairweather and Linda Zagzebski, Eds., Virtue Epistemology: Essays on Epistemic Virtue and Responsibility:Virtue Epistemology: Essays on Epistemic Virtue and Responsibility. Ethics 113 (4):876-879.
  37. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2003). Resurrecting the Author. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 27 (1):4–24.
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  38. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2003). The Silence of the God Who Speaks. Philosophia 30 (1-4):13-32.
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  39. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2003). Why Philosophy of Art Cannot Handle Kissing, Touching, and Crying. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (1):17–27.
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  40. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2002). Review: Thomas Reid: Ethics, Aesthetics and the Anatomy of the Self. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):103-107.
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  41. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2001). Do Christians Have Good Reason for Supporting Liberal Democracy? The Modern Schoolman 78 (2-3):229-248.
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  42. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2001). Living Within a Text. In Keith E. Yandell (ed.), Faith and Narrative. Oup Usa. 212.
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  43. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2001). Reformed Epistemology. In D. Z. Phillips & Timothy Tessin (eds.), Philosophy of Religion in the 21st Century. Palgrave. 39--63.
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  44. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2001). Response to Helm, Quinn, and Westphal. Religious Studies 37 (3):293-306.
    Before beginning my response, let me express the honour I feel in having these three friends and distinguished philosophical colleagues comment so thoughtfully on my ideas in Divine Discourse. I warmly thank them for their ‘labours’. I propose mirroring the general structure of the book itself in my response. First, I'll consider what Helm says about my delineation of the topic, second, what Quinn says about my discussion of God speaking; third, what Westphal says about my discussion of interpreting for (...)
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  45. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2001). Thomas Reid and the Story of Epistemology. Cambridge University Press.
    The two great philosophical figures at the culminating point of the Enlightenment are Thomas Reid in Scotland and Immanuel Kant in Germany. Reid was by far the most influential across Europe and the United States well into the nineteenth century. Since that time his fame and influence have been eclipsed by his German contemporary. This important book by one of today's leading philosophers of knowledge and religion will do much to reestablish the significance of Reid for philosophy today. Nicholas Wolterstorff (...)
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  46. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2000). God and Time. Philosophia Christi 2:5-10.
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  47. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2000). God is 'Everlasting', Not 'Eternal'. In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology. Oup Oxford.
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  48. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2000). Reid on Common Sense, with Wittgenstein's Assistance. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (3):491-517.
  49. Nicholas Wolterstorff (2000). Thomas Reid's Account of the Objectivated Character of Perception. Reid Studies 4 (1):3-16.
     
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  50. Nicholas Wolterstorff (1999). 44 Are We Entitled? In Eleonore Stump & Michael J. Murray (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: The Big Questions. Blackwell Publishers. 6--387.
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