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  1. Nick Gier, Wittgenstein and Deconstruction.
    forthcoming in Review of Contemporary Philosophy 6 (2007).
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  2. Nick Gier, Was Gandhi a Tantric?
    Annual Meeting of the Society for Asian and Comparative Philsoophy, Monterey, California, June, 2006. Also presented at the Department of Religious Studies, Rice University, November, 2006.
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  3. Nick Gier, A Response to Shyam Ranganatham.
    While on sabbatical in India in 1992, I attended a meeting of the Indian Association of Christian Philosophers held at Dharmaram College in Bangalore. The topic of the conference was ˜aªkara and Christian theology. As I sat and listened in quiet amazement to talks about how well these two suited one another, I was moved to make a comment. I stood and declared that..
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  4. Nick Gier, Bimal Krishna Matilal, Ethics and Epics: Philosophy, Culture, and Religion , Ed. Jonardon Ganeri (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2002).
    This book is the second volume of The Collected Essays of Bimal Krishna Matilal and both should be on the shelf of any serious student of Indian philosophy and religion. I was especially pleased to review this volume because, in my thirty years of teaching Indian philosophy, I focused far too much on metaphysics and epistemology and not enough on ethics. Working back from Gandhi’s ethics of nonviolence, I have been able to repair this deficiency somewhat, but Matilal has now (...)
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  5. Nick Gier, Gandhi, Ahimsa, and the Self.
    (Gandhi Marg 15:1 [April-June, 1993], pp. 24-36) Individuality is and is not even as each drop in the ocean is an individual and is not. It is not because apart from the ocean it has no existence. It is because the ocean has no existence if the drop has not, i.e., has no individuality. They are beautifully interdependent. And if this is true of the physical law, how much more so of the spiritual world!
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  6. Nick Gier, Gandhi and the Virtue of Nonviolence.
    The following essay is the main chapter of a book manuscript entitled “The Virtue of Non-Violence: from Gautama to Gandhi.” The book attempts to accomplish two principal goals: (1) to conceive of nonviolence from the standpoint of virtue ethics; and (2) to give Gandhi’s philosophy a Buddhist interpretation. My intent is not to foreclose on the possibility of a Hindu or Jain reading of Gandhi’s work; rather, I argue that there are some distinct advantages in thinking of Gandhi as a (...)
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  7. Nick Gier, Gandhi, Character Consequentialism, and the Virtue of Nonviolence.
    This paper has been extracted from a book manuscript that attempts to interpret Gandhi’s ethics of nonviolence ahimsa) in terms of virtue theory. The first section addresses the issue of virtue theory’s relationship to consequentialism and concludes that there is no way to avoid the fact that the virtues developed because of their consequences. Therefore, I will join Gandhi’s virtue ethics with P. J. Ivanhoe’s character consequentialism. Particularly significant in distinguishing utilitarianism from virtue theory is the relationship of means to (...)
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  8. Nick Gier, God, Freedom, and Evil.
    - Whitehead The novelist is still God, since he creates. . . . What has changed is that we are no longer the gods of the Victorian image, omniscient and decree­ing; but in the new theo­logical image, with freedom our first principle, not authority. . . . There is only one good definition of God: one freedom that allows other freedoms to exist.
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  9. Nick Gier, Is the New Physics Really Mystical?
    There is widespread misuse of the word "mystical." Even religious scholars do not use the word precisely. In common parlance its meaning is so loose that the word has lost its power to communicate anything intelligible. The popular books..
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  10. Nick Gier, -18th Centuries.
    The term "Mughal" comes from a mispronunciation of the word "Mongol," but the Mughals of India were mostly ethnic Turks not Mongolians. However, Barbur (1483-1530), the first Mughal emperor, could trace his blood line back to Chinggis Khan. The Muslims of Central Asia had good reason to hate the Mongols because they destroyed the Abbasid Caliphate when they sacked Baghdad in 1258. During the 300 years after the death of Chinggis, the Mongol Empire had split into four parts: the Golden (...)
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  11. Nick Gier, The Color of Sin / the Color of Skin: Ancient Color Blindness and the Philosophical Origins of Modern Racism.
    We tend to think that the two great scourges of humankind, sexism and racism, have been around since the beginning of time. With regard to sexism, this is true. Aristotle, for example, thought women are malformed men: they do not have rational souls; they do not have enough soul heat to think properly or to boil their menstrual blood into semen; and, the cruelest cut of all, they are inferior because they have one less tooth than men. Aristotle also believed, (...)
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  12. Nick Gier, The Virtues of Asian Humanism.
    Note: The Soka Gakkei (The Value Creating Society) is the largest lay Buddhist Organization in the world. They are one of 200 Buddhists sects in Japan that follow the medieval monk Nichiren’s exclusive focus on the Lotus Sutra . Daisaku Ikeda, scholar and..
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  13. Nick Gier (2003). Review of Bimal Krishna Matilal, Ethics and Epics: Philosophy, Culture, and Religion. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (6).
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  14. Nick Gier (1983). Dialectic: East and West. Indian Philosophical Quarterly: Journal of the Department of Philosophy University of Poona 10:207-218.
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