Search results for 'Nicolás Lynch' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  73
    Nicolas Lynch (1997). New Citizens and Old Politics in Peru. Constellations 4 (1):124-140.
    The article presents an analysis of the disjunction between civil and political society in Perú and its consequences in the collapse of the political parties and the rise of an authoritarian regime. It explains how citizenship developed as social rights in the realm of Peruvian civil society before the population gained access to full civil and political rights. This situation diminished the capacity of Peruvian citizens to have their own political representation and created a distance between Peru’s civil and political (...)
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  2.  15
    Nicolás Lynch (2007). What the "Left" Means in Latin American Now. Constellations 14 (3):373-383.
  3.  2
    Kevin G. Lynch, Tridib Banerjee & Michael Southworth (1990). City Sense and City Design Writings and Projects of Kevin Lynch. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  4. Alessandro Guida, Fernand Gobet & Serge Nicolas (2013). Functional Cerebral Reorganization: A Signature of Expertise? Reexamining Guida, Gobet, Tardieu, and Nicolas' Two-Stage Framework. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  5.  23
    Filippo Ferrari, Michael Lynch & Douglas Edwards (2015). Truth and Naturalism. In Kelly James Clark (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Naturalism. Wiley Blackwell
    Is truth itself natural? This is an important question for both those working on truth and those working on naturalism. For theorists of truth, answering the question of whether truth is natural will tell us more about the nature of truth (or lack of it), and the relations between truth and other properties of interest. For those working on naturalism, answering this question is of paramount importance to those who wish to have truth as part of the natural order. In (...)
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  6. Michael P. Lynch (2009). Truth as One and Many. Clarendon Press.
    What is truth? Michael Lynch defends a bold new answer to this question. Traditional theories of truth hold that truth has only a single uniform nature. All truths are true in the same way. More recent deflationary theories claim that truth has no nature at all; the concept of truth is of no real philosophical importance. In this concise and clearly written book, Lynch argues that we should reject both these extremes and hold that truth is a functional (...)
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  7. Michael P. Lynch (2011). Truth as One and Many. Oxford University Press Uk.
    What is truth? Michael Lynch defends a bold new answer to this question. Traditional theories of truth hold that truth has only a single uniform nature. All truths are true in the same way. More recent deflationary theories claim that truth has no nature at all; the concept of truth is of no real philosophical importance. In this concise and clearly written book, Lynch argues that we should reject both these extremes and hold that truth is a functional (...)
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  8.  7
    Michael P. Lynch (2001). Truth in Context: An Essay on Pluralism and Objectivity. A Bradford Book.
    A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 1999 Academic debates about pluralism and truth have become increasingly polarized in recent years. One side embraces extreme relativism, deeming any talk of objective truth as philosophically naïve. The opposition, frequently arguing that any sort of relativism leads to nihilism, insists on an objective notion of truth according to which there is only one true story of the world. Both sides agree that there is no middle path. In Truth in Context, Michael Lynch (...)
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  9.  1
    William T. Lynch (forthcoming). Social Epistemology Transformed: Steve Fuller’s Account of Knowledge as a Divine Spark for Human Domination. Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences.
    William T. Lynch ABSTRACT: In his new book, Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History, Steve Fuller returns to core themes of his program of social epistemology that he first outlined in his 1988 book, Social Epistemology. He develops a new, unorthodox theology and philosophy building upon his testimony in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District...
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  10.  30
    Cecelia Lynch (1994). Kant, the Republican Peace, and Moral Guidance in International Law. Ethics and International Affairs 8 (1):39–58.
    Lynch addresses the return to Immanuel Kant—a "prophet of progressive international reform"—and examines the relationship between the Kantian system of ethics and the development of international law in the post-Cold War era.
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  11.  26
    William T. Lynch (2005). The Ghost of Wittgenstein: Forms of Life, Scientific Method, and Cultural Critique. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (2):139-174.
    In developing an "internal" sociology of science, the sociology of scientific knowledge drew on Wittgenstein’s later philosophy to reinterpret traditional epistemological topics in sociological terms. By construing scientific reasoning as rule following within a collective, sociologists David Bloor and Harry Collins effectively blocked outside criticism of a scientific field, whether scientific, philosophical, or political. Ethnomethodologist Michael Lynch developed an alternative, Wittgensteinian reading that similarly blocked philosophical or political critique, while also disallowing analytical appeals to historical or institutional contexts. I (...)
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  12.  3
    Lisa Lynch (2002). The Epidemiology of “Regrettable Kinship”: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (3-4):203-219.
    In “The Epidemiology of ‘Regrettable Kinship’: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain,” the author analyzes two contemporary cultural texts about women and environmentally-linked illnesses to rethink commonplace understandings of the relationship between gender, disease, and community formation. By reading these narratives side by side, Lynch is able to address difficult issues about gendered subjectivity and the fragile construction of collective political identity. While the female protagonists in the texts Lynch examines relate differently (...)
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  13.  3
    Michael P. Lynch (2014). In Praise of Reason: Why Rationality Matters for Democracy. The MIT Press.
    Why does reason matter, if in the end everything comes down to blind faith or gut instinct? Why not just go with what you believe even if it contradicts the evidence? Why bother with rational explanation when name-calling, manipulation, and force are so much more effective in our current cultural and political landscape? Michael Lynch's In Praise of Reason offers a spirited defense of reason and rationality in an era of widespread skepticism--when, for example, people reject scientific evidence about (...)
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  14.  1
    Michael P. Lynch (1998). Truth in Context: An Essay on Pluralism and Objectivity. A Bradford Book.
    A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 1999 Academic debates about pluralism and truth have become increasingly polarized in recent years. One side embraces extreme relativism, deeming any talk of objective truth as philosophically naïve. The opposition, frequently arguing that any sort of relativism leads to nihilism, insists on an objective notion of truth according to which there is only one true story of the world. Both sides agree that there is no middle path. In Truth in Context, Michael Lynch (...)
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  15.  37
    Michael Lynch (1993). Scientific Practice and Ordinary Action: Ethnomethodology and Social Studies of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science have grown interested in the daily practices of scientists. Recent studies have drawn linkages between scientific innovations and more ordinary procedures, craft skills, and sources of sponsorship. These studies dispute the idea that science is the application of a unified method or the outgrowth of a progressive history of ideas. This book critically reviews arguments and empirical studies in two areas of sociology that have played a significant role in the 'sociological turn' in science (...)
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  16.  10
    Michael Lynch (2004). True to Life: Why Truth Matters. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
  17. Michael P. Lynch (2006). Rewrighting Pluralism. The Monist 89 (1):63-84.
  18.  37
    Michael P. Lynch (ed.) (2001). The Nature of Truth: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives. The MIT Press.
    These essays center around two questions: Does truth have an underlying nature? And if so, what sort of nature does it have?
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  19.  90
    Michael P. Lynch (2004). Truth and Multiple Realizability. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):384 – 408.
    Pluralism about truth is the view that there is more than one way for a proposition to be true. When taken to imply that there is more than one concept and property of truth, this position faces a number of troubling objections. I argue that we can overcome these objections, and yet retain pluralism's key insight, by taking truth to be a multiply realizable property of propositions.
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  20. Michael P. Lynch (2009). Truth, Value and Epistemic Expressivism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (1):76-97.
  21. Øystein Linnebo & David Nicolas (2008). Superplurals in English. Analysis 68 (299):186–197.
    where ‘aa’ is a plural term, and ‘F’ a plural predicate. Following George Boolos (1984) and others, many philosophers and logicians also think that plural expressions should be analysed as not introducing any new ontological commitments to some sort of ‘plural entities’, but rather as involving a new form of reference to objects to which we are already committed (for an overview and further details, see Linnebo 2004). For instance, the plural term ‘aa’ refers to Alice, Bob and Charlie simultaneously, (...)
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  22. Jack Lynch (2000). Betwixt Two Ages Cast: Milton, Johnson, and the English Renaissance. Journal of the History of Ideas 61 (3):397-413.
  23. David Capps, Michael P. Lynch & Daniel Massey (2009). A Coherent Moral Relativism. Synthese 166 (2):413 - 430.
    Moral relativism is an attractive position, but also one that it is difficult to formulate. In this paper, we propose an alternative way of formulating moral relativism that locates the relativity of morality in the property that makes moral claims true. Such an approach, we believe, has significant advantages over other possible ways of formulating moral relativism. We conclude by considering a few problems such a position might face.
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  24.  56
    Michael Lynch (1988). The Externalized Retina: Selection and Mathematization in the Visual Documentation of Objects in the Life Sciences. [REVIEW] Human Studies 11 (2-3):201 - 234.
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  25.  89
    Patrick Greenough & Michael P. Lynch (eds.) (2006). Truth and Realism. Oxford University Press.
    Is truth objective or relative? What exists independently of our minds? The essays in this book debate these two questions, which are among the oldest of philosophical issues and have vexed almost every major philosopher, from Plato, to Kant, to Wittgenstein. Fifteen eminent contributors bring fresh perspectives, renewed energy, and original answers to debates of great interest both within philosophy and in the culture at large.
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  26.  55
    E. Lynch (1995). The Line of the Horizon. Diogenes 43 (169):121-129.
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  27.  31
    M. P. Lynch (2005). Alethic Functionalism and Our Folk Theory of Truth. Synthese 145 (1):29 - 43.
    According to alethic functionalism, truth is a higher-order multiply realizable property of propositions. After briefly presenting the views main principles and motivations, I defend alethic functionalism from recent criticisms raised against it by Cory Wright. Wright argues that alethic functionalism will collapse either into deflationism or into a view that takes true as simply ambiguous. I reject both claims.
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  28. Michael Lynch (2009). Deception and the Nature of Truth. In Clancy W. Martin (ed.), The Philosophy of Deception. Oxford University Press 188.
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  29.  99
    Kevin Lynch (2012). A Multiple Realization Thesis for Natural Kinds. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):389-406.
    Two important thought-experiments are associated with the work of Hilary Putnam, one designed to establish multiple realizability for mental kinds, the other designed to establish essentialism for natural kinds. Comparing the thought-experiments with each other reveals that the scenarios in both are structurally analogous to each other, though his intuitions in both are greatly at variance, intuitions that have been simultaneously well received. The intuition in the former implies a thesis that prioritizes pre-scientific over scientific indicators for identifying mental kinds (...)
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  30.  89
    Kevin Lynch (2010). Self-Deception, Religious Belief, and the False Belief Condition. Heythrop Journal 51 (6):1073-1074.
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  31. Michael P. Lynch (2006). Zombies and the Case of the Phenomenal Pickpocket. Synthese 149 (1):37-58.
    A prevailing view in contemporary philosophy of mind is that zombies are logically possible. I argue, via a thought experiment, that if this prevailing view is correct, then I could be transformed into a zombie. If I could be transformed into a zombie, then surprisingly, I am not certain that I am conscious. Regrettably, this is not just an idiosyncratic fact about my psychology; I think you are in the same position. This means that we must revise or replace some (...)
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  32.  35
    Jack Lynch (2000). Betwixt Two Ages Cast: Milton, Johnson, and the English Renaissance. Journal of the History of Ideas 61 (3):397-413.
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  33.  22
    Evan G. DeRenzo, Nneka Mokwunye & John J. Lynch (2006). Rounding: How Everyday Ethics Can Invigorate a Hospital's Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 18 (4):319-331.
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  34.  35
    By Michael P. Lynch (2004). Minimalism and the Value of Truth. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (217):497–517.
    Minimalists generally see themselves as engaged in a descriptive project. They maintain that they can explain everything we want to say about truth without appealing to anything other than the T-schema, i.e., the idea that the proposition that p is true iff p. I argue that despite recent claims to the contrary, minimalists cannot explain one important belief many people have about truth, namely, that truth is good. If that is so, then minimalism, and possibly deflationism as a whole, must (...)
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  35.  48
    Michael Lynch (1999). Silence in Context: Ethnomethodology and Social Theory. [REVIEW] Human Studies 22 (2-4):211-233.
    Ethnomethodologists (or at least many of them) have been reticent about their theoretical sources and methodological principles. It frequently falls to others to make such matters explicit. In this paper I discuss this silence about theory, but rather than entering the breach by specifying a set of implicit assumptions and principles, I suggest that the reticence is consistent with ethnomethodology's distinctive research 'program'. The main part of the paper describes the pedagogical exercises and forms of apprenticeship through which Garfinkel and (...)
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  36. Michael Lynch (1991). Pictures of Nothing? Visual Construals in Social Theory. Sociological Theory 9 (1):1-21.
    This paper builds upon ethnomethodological and social constructivist studies of representation in the natural sciences to examine sociological theory, a field that is much closer to home. An analysis of diagrams and related illustrations in theory texts shows that labels, geometric boundaries, vectors, and symmetries often are used to convey a sense of orderly flows of causal influences in a homogeneous field. These graphic elements make up what I call a "rhetorical mathematics" that conveys an impression of rationality. Although theory (...)
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  37.  64
    Michael P. Lynch & Joshua Glasgow (2003). The Impossibility of Superdupervenience. Philosophical Studies 113 (3):201-221.
    Supervenience has provided a way for nonreductive materialists to explain how the mental can be physically irreducible but still physically respectable. In recent years, doubts about this research program have emerged from a number of quarters. Consequently, Terence Horgan has argued that nonreductive materialists must appeal to an upgraded "superdupervenience," if supervenience is to do any materialist work. We argue that nonreductive materialism cannot meet this challenge. Superdupervenience is impossible.
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  38.  12
    Evan G. Derenzo, Janicemarie Vinicky, Barbara Redman, John J. Lynch, Philip Panzarella & Salim Rizk (2006). Rounding: A Model for Consultation and Training Whose Time Has Come. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (2):207-215.
    Ethics rounds in clinical ethics have already taken hold in multiple venues. There are “sit-down rounds,” which usually consist of a bioethicist setting a specific, prescheduled time aside for residents and/or others to bring a case or two for discussion with the bioethicist. Another kind of rounds that occurs on an ad hoc or infrequent basis is to have either a staff or outside bioethicist give hospital-wide and/or departmental “grand rounds.” Grand rounds is a traditional educational format in medicine and (...)
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  39.  67
    Michael P. Lynch (2008). Alethic Pluralism, Logical Consequence and the Universality of Reason. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):122-140.
  40.  20
    David Nicolas & Patrick Caudal (2005). Types of Degrees and Types of Event Structures. In Event Arguments: Foundations and Applications. Mouton de Gruyter 277-300.
    In this paper, we investigate how certain types of predicates should be connected with certain types of degree scales, and how this can affect the events they describe. The distribution and interpretation of various degree adverbials will serve us as a guideline in this perspective. They suggest that two main types of degree scales should be distinguished: (i) quantity scales, which are characterized by the semantic equivalence of Yannig ate the cake partially and Yannig ate part of the cake; quantity (...)
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  41.  60
    Michael Lynch (1991). Science in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Moral and Epistemic Relations Between Diagrams and Photographs. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):205-226.
    Sociologists, philosophers and historians of science are gradually recognizing the importance of visual representation. This is part of a more general movement away from a theory-centric view of science and towards an interest in practical aspects of observation and experimentation. Rather than treating science as a matter of demonstrating the logical connection between theoretical and empirical statements, an increasing number of investigations are examining how scientists compose and use diagrams, graphs, photographs, micrographs, maps, charts, and related visual displays. This paper (...)
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  42.  74
    Michael P. Lynch (1999). Relativity of Fact and Content. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):579-595.
    A common strategy amongst realists grants relativism at the level of language or thought but denies it at the level of fact. Their point is that even if our concept of an object is relative to a conceptual scheme, it doesn't follow that objects themselves are relative to conceptual schemes. This is a sensible point. But in this paper I present a simple argument for the conclusion that it is false. According to what I call the T-argument, relativism about content (...)
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  43.  99
    Michael P. Lynch (1997). Three Models of Conceptual Schemes. Inquiry 40 (4):407 – 426.
    Despite widespread confusion over its meaning, the notion of a conceptual scheme is pervasive in Anglo-American philosophy, particularly amongst those who call themselves ' conceptual relativists'. In this paper, I identify three different ways to understand conceptual schemes. I argue that the two most common models, deriving from Kant and Quine, are flawed, and, in addition, useless for the relativist. Instead, I urge adoption of a 'neo-Kantian', broadly Wittgensteinian model, which, it is ' argued, is immune from Davidsonian objections to (...)
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  44.  41
    Tony Lynch & A. J. Walsh (2000). The Good Mercenary? Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (2):133–153.
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  45.  20
    Lawrence E. Lynch (1959). Presidential Address. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 33:1-8.
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  46.  2
    John Lynch & Monica Mitchell (2010). Community Engagement and the Ethics of Global, Translational Research: A Response to Sofaer and Eyal. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):37-38.
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  47. David Nicolas (2009). Mereological Essentialism, Composition, and Stuff: A Reply to Kristie Miller. Erkenntnis 71 (3):425 - 429.
    In ‘Essential stuff' (2008) and ‘Stuff' (2009), Kristie Miller argues that two generally accepted theses, often formulated as follows, are incompatible: - (Temporal) mereological essentialism for stuff (or matter), the thesis that any portion of stuff has the same parts at every time it exists. - Stuff composition, the thesis that for any two portions of stuff, there exists a portion of stuff that is their mereological sum (or fusion). She does this by considering competing hypotheses about stuff, trying to (...)
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  48.  19
    Lawrence E. Lynch (1951). A History of Philosophy. New Scholasticism 25 (4):488-492.
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  49.  29
    J. A. Lynch (1929). Time-Systems as Perspectives. Journal of Philosophy 26 (24):657-662.
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  50.  9
    Tony Lynch & Adrian Walsh (2003). The Mandevillean Conceit and the Profit-Motive. Philosophy 78 (1):43-63.
    Invisible Hand accounts of the operations of the competitive market are often thought to have two implications for morality as it confronts economic life. First, explanantions of agents economic activities eschew constitutive appeal to moral notions; and second, such moralism is pernicious insofar as it tends to undermine the operations of a socially valuable social process. This is the Mandevillean Conceit. The Conceit rests on an avarice-only reading of the profit-motive that is mistaken. The avarice-only reading is not the only (...)
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